Gulliver's Travels Questions: Quiz!

45 Questions | Total Attempts: 3274

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Gulliver

Have you ever read Gulliver’s Travels? Gulliver’s Travels is a book divided into four parts. The author is Jonathan Swift, and it is a 1726 prose satire. It is Swift’s best known full-length work and classic American literature. According to this quiz, you must be aware of information such as what the people of Lilliput call Gulliver and how the Lilliputians punish Gulliver. This great quiz will tell you all about Gulliver’s Travels. Have fun!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The people of Lilliput call Gulliver _____.
    • A. 

      Man-Hill

    • B. 

      Man-Mountain

    • C. 

      Man-Giant

    • D. 

      Man-House

  • 2. 
    Instead of killing him outright, the Lilliputians decide on which of the following punishments for Gulliver?
    • A. 

      Exiling him

    • B. 

      Cutting off his hair

    • C. 

      Blinding him and slowly starving him to death

    • D. 

      Poisoning him

  • 3. 
    The people of Lilliput are very _____.
    • A. 

      Small

    • B. 

      Big

    • C. 

      Huge

    • D. 

      Thin

  • 4. 
    The country of Lilliput is _____ the country of Blefuscu.
    • A. 

      Under

    • B. 

      A long way from

    • C. 

      Friendly with

    • D. 

      At war with

  • 5. 
    When Gulliver wakes up in Lilliput, he cannot _______.
    • A. 

      See

    • B. 

      Move

    • C. 

      Hear

    • D. 

      Speak

  • 6. 
    The argument between the Big-Endians and the Small-Endians was about ...
    • A. 

      Ships

    • B. 

      Eggs

    • C. 

      Shoes

  • 7. 
    When Gulliver first arrives in Brobdingnag, he hides in a ____.
    • A. 

      House

    • B. 

      Field

    • C. 

      Cooking pot

    • D. 

      Wooden box

  • 8. 
    ____ is one of the most important officials who helps Gulliver at first.
    • A. 

      Yahoo

    • B. 

      Struldbrug

    • C. 

      Flimnap

    • D. 

      Reldresal

  • 9. 
    Who said, "For six years we've had two political groups, the High-Heels and the Low-Heels"?
    • A. 

      Gulliver

    • B. 

      Gulliver's wife

    • C. 

      Reldresal

    • D. 

      The King of Blefuscu

  • 10. 
    The King of Brobdingnag thinks that political life in England is ____.
    • A. 

      Perfect

    • B. 

      Polite

    • C. 

      Terrible

    • D. 

      Clever

  • 11. 
    What does the farmer make Gulliver do in order to earn money?
    • A. 

      Perform tricks for spectators

    • B. 

      Spy on neighboring farmers

    • C. 

      Work in the fields

    • D. 

      Kill rats

  • 12. 
    There are two groups of people in Lilliput who argue about ____.
    • A. 

      Which color shoes to wear

    • B. 

      Which end to break their eggs

    • C. 

      Which language to speak

    • D. 

      Which king and queen to choose

  • 13. 
    In Brobdingnag, a monkey takes Gulliver ____.
    • A. 

      Over the fence

    • B. 

      Down the garden

    • C. 

      Up a tree

    • D. 

      On to the roof

  • 14. 
    How does Gulliver end up stranded in Lilliput?
    • A. 

      He survives a shipwreck.

    • B. 

      His crew abandons him.

    • C. 

      He is dropped there by an enormous eagle.

    • D. 

      He stops there for provisions and is trapped while he sleeps.

  • 15. 
    What is the line of doctrine over which the Blefuscudians and Lilliputians differ?
    • A. 

      "All true believers shall break their eggs at the small end."

    • B. 

      "All true believers shall break their eggs at the big end."

    • C. 

      "All true believers shall break their eggs as they see fit."

    • D. 

      "All true believers shall break their eggs at the convenient end."

  • 16. 
    Who is Gulliver's main enemy in the royal court of Brobdingnag?
    • A. 

      The king

    • B. 

      The dwarf

    • C. 

      The queen

    • D. 

      Reldresal

  • 17. 
    Satire is
    • A. 

      A rehetorical device in which two seemingly contradictory words are used together for an effect

    • B. 

      A literary work that ridicules its subject through the use of specific techniques in order to make a comment about it

    • C. 

      A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things

  • 18. 
    An oxymoron is
    • A. 

      A contrast or discrepancy between expectation and reality

    • B. 

      A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things

    • C. 

      A rhetorical device in which two seemingly contradictory words are used together for effect

  • 19. 
    Incongruity is
    • A. 

      To present things that are out of place or are abdsurd in relation to the surroundings

    • B. 

      To enlarge or represent something beyond normal bounds so that it becomes ridiculous

    • C. 

      To imitate the techniques and/or style of some person in order to ridicule the original

  • 20. 
    Parody is
    • A. 

      To imitate the techniques and/or style of some person in order to ridicule the original

    • B. 

      To present the opposite of the normal order

    • C. 

      To present things that are out of place or are absurd in relation to the surroundings

  • 21. 
    Metaphor is
    • A. 

      A contrast between expectation and reality

    • B. 

      A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things

    • C. 

      A rehetorical device in which two seemingly contradictory words are used together for an effect

  • 22. 
    An example of a metaphor is
    • A. 

      The wet flame flickered in darkness.

    • B. 

      There are millions of things to do.

    • C. 

      "Life is a journey, travel it well."

  • 23. 
    Situational irony ...
    • A. 

      Occurs when the intended meaning of a statement differs from the meaning that the words appear to express

    • B. 

      Involves an incongruity between what is expected or intended and what actually occurs

    • C. 

      Occurs in a narrative when the audience knows more about the circumstances than a character

  • 24. 
    Hyperbole is a(n)
    • A. 

      Extreme exaggeration

    • B. 

      Understatement

    • C. 

      Comparison between two unlike things

  • 25. 
    Caricature means
    • A. 

      To imitate the techniques of some person in order to ridicule the original

    • B. 

      To enlarge something beyond normal bounds so that it becomes ridiculous

    • C. 

      To present things that are out of place in relation to the surroundings