Electron Shell Structure Quiz

Reviewed by Zohra Sattar Waxali
Zohra Sattar Waxali, PhD (Chemistry) |
Chemistry
Review Board Member
Dr. Zohra Sattar Waxali earned her doctorate in chemistry and biochemistry from Northwestern University, specializing in the metallomes of cardiac cells and stem cells, and their impact on biological function. Her research encompasses the development of arsenoplatin chemotherapeutics, stapled peptide estrogen receptor inhibitors, and antimicrobial natural products. With her expertise, Dr. Waxali ensures the accuracy and relevance of our chemistry quizzes, contributing to a comprehensive understanding of chemical principles and advancements in the field.
, PhD (Chemistry)
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Quizzes Created: 6 | Total Attempts: 28,777
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Electron Shell Structure Quiz - Quiz

Welcome to the Electron Shell Structure Quiz! Dive into the fascinating world of atomic theory and test your knowledge of electron configurations, energy levels, and orbitals. This quiz is designed to challenge your understanding of key concepts like the distribution of electrons in different shells, subshells, and orbitals according to the Aufbau principle, Hund's rule, and the Pauli exclusion principle.
Whether you're a student studying for an exam, a teacher seeking engaging classroom content, or an enthusiast eager to reinforce your understanding, this quiz covers all aspects of the electron shell structure. You'll explore how electrons fill energy levels Read morein atoms, the distinction between s, p, d, and f orbitals, and how these arrangements dictate the chemical properties of elements.
Each question provides instant feedback with detailed explanations, helping you learn from your mistakes and strengthen your grasp of the subject. Take the Electron Shell Structure Quiz today and discover how well you understand the building blocks of the periodic table. Learn, challenge, and improve your knowledge!


Electron Shell Structure Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    Aluminum has a proton number of 13. Its electron configuration will be 2, 8, and 3.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The electron configuration of an element represents the arrangement of electrons in its atomic orbitals. The proton number of an element determines the number of electrons in its neutral state. Since aluminum has a proton number of 13, it will have 13 electrons. According to the Aufbau principle, electrons fill the atomic orbitals in order of increasing energy. Therefore, the electron configuration of aluminum will be 2, 8, and 3, indicating that it has 2 electrons in the first energy level, 8 electrons in the second energy level, and 3 electrons in the third energy level. Hence, the statement is true.

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  • 2. 

    All the elements can bond with other elements.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    This statement is false because not all elements can bond with other elements. Some elements, such as the noble gasses, have full valence electron shells and are therefore stable and unreactive. They do not readily form bonds with other elements.

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  • 3. 

    Electron shells are areas where electrons can be found around the nucleus.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Electron shells are regions surrounding the nucleus of an atom where electrons are likely to be found. These shells are organized into different energy levels, and each level can hold a specific number of electrons. The statement "Electron shells are areas where electrons can be found around the nucleus" is true because it accurately describes the concept of electron shells in atomic structure.

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  • 4. 

    Potassium's proton number is 19. it will have 4 shells.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Potassium's proton number is 19, indicating that it has 19 protons in its nucleus. The number of protons determines the atomic number of an element, which in turn determines its position on the periodic table. The electron configuration of an atom is determined by the number of protons, and it is this electron configuration that determines the number of shells an atom will have. Since potassium has 19 protons, it will have 4 shells, as the electron configuration of potassium is 2-8-8-1. Therefore, the statement is true.

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  • 5. 

    Neon's proton number is 9. It will have 5 electron shells.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Neon's proton number is 10, not 9. This means that it has 10 protons in its nucleus. The number of electron shells in an atom is determined by its proton number. Each shell can hold a certain number of electrons, with the first shell holding a maximum of 2 electrons, the second shell holding a maximum of 8 electrons, and so on. Since Neon has 10 protons, it will have a total of 10 electrons distributed among its electron shells. Therefore, it will have a maximum of 4 electron shells, not 5.

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  • 6. 

    Potassium's proton number is 19. 2, 8, 8, 1 will be its electron configuration.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The electron configuration of an atom refers to the arrangement of electrons in its energy levels or shells. The electron configuration of potassium (atomic number 19) can be determined by filling the energy levels in order of increasing energy. The first energy level can hold a maximum of 2 electrons, the second energy level can hold a maximum of 8 electrons, and the third energy level can also hold a maximum of 8 electrons. Therefore, the electron configuration of potassium will be 2, 8, 8, 1, indicating that it has 2 electrons in the first energy level, 8 electrons in the second energy level, 8 electrons in the third energy level, and 1 electron in the fourth energy level. Hence, the given statement is true.

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  • 7. 

    Most elements do not have full electron shells, so they can bond with other elements.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    This statement is false because most elements do not bond with other elements solely because they do not have full electron shells. The bonding behavior of elements is determined by various factors such as their electronegativity, valence electrons, and the need to achieve a stable electron configuration. While the desire to achieve a full electron shell can be a contributing factor, it is not the sole reason for element bonding.

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  • 8. 

    Neon's proton number is 8. It will have 1 electron shell.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Neon's proton number is 10, not 8. It belongs to the noble gas group, and in its neutral state, it has 10 protons and 10 electrons. Since the number of electrons determines the number of electron shells, Neon will have 2 electron shells, not 1.

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  • 9. 

    Neon's proton number is 10. It will have 2 electron shells.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Neon's proton number is indeed 10, which means it has 10 protons in its nucleus. According to the electron configuration of atoms, the number of electrons in an atom is equal to the number of protons. Since Neon has 10 protons, it will also have 10 electrons. The distribution of these electrons in different energy levels or shells follows a specific pattern. In the case of Neon, it will have 2 electron shells, with 2 electrons in the innermost shell and 8 electrons in the outermost shell. Therefore, the statement is true.

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  • 10. 

    Every element on the periodic table has 4 electron shells which follow the 2, 8, 8, 2 structure.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The explanation for the answer being false is that not every element on the periodic table has 4 electron shells with a 2, 8, 8, 2 structure. The number of electron shells and their arrangement varies depending on the element. Some elements may have fewer or more electron shells, and the number of electrons in each shell can also differ. Therefore, it is incorrect to say that every element follows the 2, 8, 8, 2 structure.

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Zohra Sattar Waxali |PhD (Chemistry) |
Chemistry
Dr. Zohra Sattar Waxali earned her doctorate in chemistry and biochemistry from Northwestern University, specializing in the metallomes of cardiac cells and stem cells, and their impact on biological function. Her research encompasses the development of arsenoplatin chemotherapeutics, stapled peptide estrogen receptor inhibitors, and antimicrobial natural products. With her expertise, Dr. Waxali ensures the accuracy and relevance of our chemistry quizzes, contributing to a comprehensive understanding of chemical principles and advancements in the field.

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  • Current Version
  • May 14, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team

    Expert Reviewed by
    Zohra Sattar Waxali
  • Nov 06, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Superoxideion01
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