EEG MCQ Quiz Questions

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EEG MCQ Quiz Questions - Quiz

Can you pass this test with these EEG MCQ quiz questions? The human brain is considered the most interesting part of the body to study. An electroencephalogram is a perfect test for diagnosing some problems that may have a connection with the brain. The quiz below is designed to test out if you understand how to carry out and denounce meaning from an EEG before your board exams. Give it a try!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    High amplitude slowing can be elicited by ___________ & _____________.

    • A.

      Hyperventilation, Closing of Eyes

    • B.

      Arousal, Drowsiness

    • C.

      Stage 2 Sleep, REM Sleep

    • D.

      Hyperventilation, Drowsiness

    • E.

      Drowsiness, Photic Stimulation

    Correct Answer
    D. Hyperventilation, Drowsiness
    Explanation
    High amplitude slowing refers to a pattern seen on an electroencephalogram (EEG) where there is a decrease in the frequency and increase in the amplitude of brain waves. Hyperventilation is a technique that involves rapid and deep breathing, which can cause changes in the blood chemistry and lead to high amplitude slowing on the EEG. Drowsiness, on the other hand, is a state of reduced alertness and can also be associated with high amplitude slowing on the EEG. Therefore, both hyperventilation and drowsiness can elicit high amplitude slowing.

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  • 2. 

    Wave with a single deflection either up or down from the baseline.

    • A.

      Transient

    • B.

      Polyphasic

    • C.

      Paroxysmal

    • D.

      Monophasic

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    D. Monophasic
    Explanation
    A wave with a single deflection either up or down from the baseline is referred to as monophasic. This means that the wave only has one phase or direction of movement. It does not have multiple phases or deflections like in polyphasic waves. Transient refers to something that is temporary or short-lived, paroxysmal refers to sudden and intense episodes, and epileptiform refers to waveforms resembling those seen in epilepsy.

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  • 3. 

    What pattern is affected by eye-opening and closing?

    • A.

      Alpha Rhythm

    • B.

      Posterior Dominant Rhythm

    • C.

      Beta Rhythm

    • D.

      Mu Rhythm

    • E.

      Triphasic Waveforms

    Correct Answer
    B. Posterior Dominant Rhythm
    Explanation
    Eye-opening and closing affects the Posterior Dominant Rhythm. The Posterior Dominant Rhythm is an electrical brain activity pattern that is most prominent in the posterior regions of the brain. It is typically observed when a person is awake with their eyes closed, and it becomes less prominent when the eyes are opened. Therefore, the pattern is affected by eye-opening and closing.

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  • 4. 

    A wave that has 2 or more components of a different direction.

    • A.

      Diphasic

    • B.

      Ictal

    • C.

      Monophasic

    • D.

      Polyphasic

    • E.

      Interictal

    Correct Answer
    D. Polyphasic
    Explanation
    Polyphasic refers to a wave that has 2 or more components of a different direction. This means that the wave consists of multiple phases or components that are moving in different directions. It could be a combination of positive and negative phases or waves that are moving in opposite directions. This term is commonly used in the context of brain waves or electrical activity in the brain, where polyphasic waves may indicate abnormal or pathological activity.

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  • 5. 

    Sharply contoured waveforms that are judged to be abnormal.

    • A.

      Ictal

    • B.

      Transient

    • C.

      Interictal

    • D.

      Sharp transient

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    D. Sharp transient
    Explanation
    Sharp transient waveforms are characterized by sudden and brief changes in electrical activity in the brain. These waveforms are often seen in individuals with epilepsy during seizures or ictal periods. They can be distinguished from other types of waveforms, such as transient or interictal, by their sharp and distinct contours. These abnormal waveforms, also known as epileptiform activity, indicate abnormal brain function and can help in diagnosing and monitoring epilepsy.

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  • 6. 

    Regular waves that are similar to sine waves.

    • A.

      Transient

    • B.

      Polyphasic

    • C.

      Ictal

    • D.

      Diphasic

    • E.

      Sinusoidal

    Correct Answer
    E. Sinusoidal
    Explanation
    Sinusoidal waves are regular waves that closely resemble sine waves. They have a smooth, repetitive pattern with a consistent frequency and amplitude. Sinusoidal waves are commonly found in various natural phenomena, such as sound waves, electromagnetic waves, and water waves. In the context of the given options, sinusoidal is the most appropriate term to describe regular waves that resemble sine waves.

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  • 7. 

    Electrographic Seizure Pattern.

    • A.

      Ictal

    • B.

      Interictal

    • C.

      Sharp transient

    • D.

      Irregular Activity

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    A. Ictal
    Explanation
    The term "Ictal" refers to the period during a seizure when the abnormal electrical activity in the brain causes the characteristic symptoms of a seizure. This includes the actual seizure activity itself, which can be observed on an electroencephalogram (EEG) as an electrographic seizure pattern. The other options, such as "Interictal" (between seizures), "Sharp transient" (a type of EEG waveform), "Irregular Activity" (a general description of abnormal brain activity), and "Epileptiform" (abnormal EEG patterns associated with epilepsy) are not specific to the ictal period.

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  • 8. 

    Waveforms associated with and without clinical seizure manifestations.

    • A.

      Ictal

    • B.

      Interictal

    • C.

      Paroxysmal

    • D.

      Irregular Activity

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    E. Epileptiform
    Explanation
    The term "epileptiform" refers to waveforms that are characteristic of epilepsy or seizure activity. These waveforms can be observed during an electroencephalogram (EEG), which is a test used to diagnose and monitor seizures. Epileptiform waveforms are abnormal electrical discharges in the brain that are often associated with clinical seizure manifestations, such as convulsions or loss of consciousness. Therefore, the term "epileptiform" is the most appropriate choice to describe waveforms associated with clinical seizure manifestations.

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  • 9. 

    An event that stands out against the background.

    • A.

      Transient

    • B.

      Ictal

    • C.

      Diphasic

    • D.

      Interictal

    • E.

      Triphasic

    Correct Answer
    A. Transient
    Explanation
    Transient refers to something that is temporary or short-lived. In the context of the given question, an event that stands out against the background is likely to be something that occurs briefly or momentarily, making the term "transient" the most suitable answer.

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  • 10. 

    Two components that are on opposite sides of the baseline.

    • A.

      Sinusoidal

    • B.

      Triphasic

    • C.

      Epileptiform

    • D.

      Diphasic

    • E.

      Sharp Transient

    Correct Answer
    D. Diphasic
    Explanation
    Diphasic refers to a waveform or signal that has two distinct phases or components. In this context, the two components mentioned in the question are on opposite sides of the baseline. Therefore, diphasic is the correct answer as it accurately describes the waveform with two phases.

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  • 11. 

    Wave with a single deflection either up or down from the baseline.

    • A.

      Transient

    • B.

      Polyphasic

    • C.

      Paroxysmal

    • D.

      Monophasic

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    D. Monophasic
    Explanation
    A wave with a single deflection either up or down from the baseline is described as monophasic. This means that the wave has only one phase or direction of deflection. It does not have multiple phases or deflections like the other options (transient, polyphasic, paroxysmal, epileptiform).

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  • 12. 

    A wave that has 2 or more components of a different direction.

    • A.

      Diphasic

    • B.

      Ictal

    • C.

      Monophasic

    • D.

      Polyphasic

    • E.

      Interictal

    Correct Answer
    D. Polyphasic
    Explanation
    Polyphasic refers to a wave that has 2 or more components of a different direction. This means that the wave consists of multiple phases or components that are moving in different directions. It is the only option that accurately describes a wave with multiple components of different directions, making it the correct answer.

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  • 13. 

    Electrographic Seizure Pattern.

    • A.

      Ictal

    • B.

      Interictal

    • C.

      Sharp transient

    • D.

      Irregular Activity

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    A. Ictal
    Explanation
    The term "ictal" refers to the period of time during a seizure, when abnormal electrical activity occurs in the brain. It is characterized by various patterns, including sharp transient and irregular activity. The other options, interictal and epileptiform, describe different types of electrical activity that can occur outside of a seizure. Therefore, the correct answer is "Ictal" because it specifically refers to the seizure period.

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  • 14. 

    Waveforms associated with and without clinical seizure manifestations.

    • A.

      Ictal

    • B.

      Interictal

    • C.

      Paroxysmal

    • D.

      Irregular Activity

    • E.

      Epileptiform

    Correct Answer
    E. Epileptiform
    Explanation
    The term "epileptiform" refers to waveforms that are characteristic of epilepsy or seizure activity. These waveforms can be observed on an electroencephalogram (EEG) and are typically abnormal in nature. They are often associated with clinical seizure manifestations, such as convulsions or loss of consciousness. In contrast, waveforms without clinical seizure manifestations are considered normal or non-epileptiform. Therefore, the term "epileptiform" is the most appropriate choice to describe waveforms associated with clinical seizure manifestations.

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  • 15. 

    Two components that are on opposite sides of the baseline.

    • A.

      Sinusoidal

    • B.

      Triphasic

    • C.

      Epileptiform

    • D.

      Diphasic

    • E.

      Sharp Transient

    Correct Answer
    D. Diphasic
    Explanation
    Diphasic refers to a waveform or signal that has two distinct phases or components. In this context, it suggests that there are two components present in the waveform that are on opposite sides of the baseline. This means that the waveform has both positive and negative components, indicating a change in direction or polarity. The other options, such as sinusoidal, triphasic, epileptiform, and sharp transient, do not necessarily imply the presence of two opposite components, making them incorrect answers.

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  • 16. 

    One or more waves that begin abruptly stand out from the ongoing EEG activity, reach maximum amplitude rapidly and disappear suddenly.

    • A.

      Paroxysmal

    • B.

      Transient

    • C.

      Polyphasic

    • D.

      Epileptiform

    • E.

      Ictal

    Correct Answer
    A. Paroxysmal
    Explanation
    Paroxysmal refers to a sudden and intense occurrence or event. In the context of the given statement, it suggests that the waves described exhibit a sudden onset, peak rapidly, and then abruptly disappear. The term "paroxysmal" accurately describes this characteristic of the waves, making it the correct answer.

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  • 17. 

    A wave with three components alternating about the baseline.

    • A.

      Monophasic

    • B.

      Triphasic

    • C.

      Polyphasic

    • D.

      Transient

    • E.

      Sinusoidal

    Correct Answer
    B. Triphasic
    Explanation
    Triphasic refers to a wave with three components alternating about the baseline. In this context, it means that the wave has three distinct phases or segments that alternate in a cyclical pattern. This term is commonly used in medical and physiological contexts to describe certain types of electrical or physiological waveforms, such as in muscle activity or nerve conduction.

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  • 18. 

    What unit is used to describe amplitude?

    • A.

      Kilowatts

    • B.

      Univolts

    • C.

      Hertz

    • D.

      Microvolts

    • E.

      Gigawatts

    Correct Answer
    D. Microvolts
    Explanation
    The unit used to describe amplitude is microvolts. Amplitude refers to the maximum value of a waveform, and it is typically measured in volts. The prefix "micro-" indicates one millionth, so microvolts represent a very small unit of voltage. Kilowatts, univolts, hertz, and gigawatts are not units used to describe amplitude.

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  • 19. 

    Which wave pattern is a disorder with multifocal epileptiform discharges observed using the EEG?

    • A.

      Medication Effect

    • B.

      Infantile Spasms

    • C.

      Paroxysmal Spike and Wave Complex

    • D.

      Hyperventilation

    • E.

      Photic Response

    Correct Answer
    B. Infantile Spasms
    Explanation
    Infantile spasms is the correct answer because it is a disorder characterized by multifocal epileptiform discharges observed using the EEG. This condition typically presents in infancy and is characterized by brief, symmetric muscle contractions that occur in clusters. The EEG findings in infantile spasms often show a hypsarrhythmia pattern, which is characterized by high-amplitude, disorganized, and chaotic brain wave activity. This pattern is indicative of abnormal brain function and is commonly associated with the diagnosis of infantile spasms.

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  • 20. 

    The frequency of Delta waves is

    • A.

      Less than 4 Hertz

    • B.

      Greater than 13 Hertz

    • C.

      4-7 Hertz

    • D.

      8-13 Hertz

    • E.

      6-10 Hertz

    Correct Answer
    A. Less than 4 Hertz
    Explanation
    Delta waves are a type of brainwave that are associated with deep sleep and unconsciousness. They have a frequency range of less than 4 Hertz, which means they occur less than 4 times per second. This frequency range is characteristic of the slowest and highest amplitude brainwaves. It is important to note that delta waves are typically only present in adults during deep sleep or certain brain disorders, and they are more commonly observed in infants and young children.

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  • 21. 

    The frequency of Beta Waves is

    • A.

      Less than 4 Hertz

    • B.

      Greater than 13 Hertz

    • C.

      6-10 Hertz

    • D.

      8-13 Hertz

    • E.

      Greater than 13 hertz

    Correct Answer
    E. Greater than 13 hertz
    Explanation
    Beta waves are a type of brainwave that are associated with alertness, concentration, and active thinking. They have a frequency range of 13 to 30 Hertz. Therefore, the correct answer is "Greater than 13 hertz".

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  • 22. 

    The frequency of theta waves is

    • A.

      Less than 4 hertz

    • B.

      Greater than 13 hertz

    • C.

      4-7 Hertz

    • D.

      8-13 Hertz

    • E.

      Greater than 13 Hertz

    Correct Answer
    C. 4-7 Hertz
    Explanation
    Theta waves are a type of brainwave that occurs during light sleep or deep relaxation. They have a frequency range of 4-7 Hertz, which means they oscillate at a rate of 4 to 7 cycles per second. This frequency range is associated with increased creativity, deep meditation, and enhanced memory. Frequencies below 4 Hertz are typically associated with delta waves, which occur during deep sleep, while frequencies above 7 Hertz are associated with alpha waves, which occur during wakefulness and relaxation. Therefore, the correct answer is 4-7 Hertz.

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  • 23. 

    The average human brain weighs ____ pounds?

    • A.

      4

    • B.

      8

    • C.

      3

    • D.

      5

    • E.

      6

    Correct Answer
    C. 3
    Explanation
    The average human brain weighs 3 pounds.

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  • 24. 

    Name one of the three main parts of the brain.

    • A.

      Medulla

    • B.

      Cerebrum

    • C.

      Cerebellum

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Medulla
    B. Cerebrum
    C. Cerebellum
    Explanation
    The three main parts of the brain are the medulla, cerebrum, and cerebellum. The medulla is responsible for controlling vital functions such as breathing and heart rate. The cerebrum is the largest part of the brain and is responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, memory, and perception. The cerebellum is involved in coordinating movement and maintaining balance.

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  • 25. 

    What is the name of the three protective membranes that cover and protect the brain?

    • A.

      Cerebral Spinal Fluid

    • B.

      Meninges

    • C.

      Cortex

    • D.

      Viscera

    • E.

      Forebrain

    Correct Answer
    B. Meninges
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Meninges". The meninges are the three protective membranes that cover and protect the brain. They consist of the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. These membranes help to cushion and protect the brain from injury, as well as provide support and nutrition to the brain.

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