EDF 1005 Quiz 9

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 176

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EDF 1005 Quiz 9

Quiz on Chapter 8 in the Textbook and readings from week 7 and 8.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    This Greek philosopher  was of a noble family and was related through his father to Codrus and on his mother's side to Solon. His real name was Aristocles. Physically perfect, he had an artistic and dialectical temperament which remained with him through his whole life and made of him the philosopher-poet
    • A. 

      Isocrates

    • B. 

      Socrates

    • C. 

      Plato

    • D. 

      Aristotle

  • 2. 
    This philosopher is one of the most accomplished geniuses humanity has ever known. In him are united the speculative and scientific spirit and the sense of artistic beauty, the influence of which have been felt in all times. All his known works remain extant, that is, thirty-six dialogues, thirteen letters and a collection of definitions. 
    • A. 

      Socrates

    • B. 

      Heraclitus

    • C. 

      Anaxagoras

    • D. 

      Plato

  • 3. 
    This Greek philosopher believed that philosophy is conceived of in its practical order. Man must seek the truth; and once the truth is discovered in the purely speculative field, it must serve to find the solution of practical problems: Philosophy must render man morally better
    • A. 

      Aristotle

    • B. 

      Parmenides

    • C. 

      Socrates

    • D. 

      Plato

  • 4. 
    The basis of this philosopher's school, the Academy, in which he further developed idealism. The search for truth in all things through Socratic dialogue was the basis for the school.
    • A. 

      Aristotle

    • B. 

      Socratic

    • C. 

      Plato

    • D. 

      Pythagoras

  • 5. 
    Which of the following are not one of the basic truths of Plato
    • A. 

      Truth is in all things

    • B. 

      People should search for truth because it is eternal and perfect.

    • C. 

      Since there are universal truths in mathematics (the concept of 2+2=4 was true before being discovered), then there must be the same in other fields such as politics, religion and education.

    • D. 

      Reality is based in matter

  • 6. 
    Which of the following are not one of the basic truths of Plato
    • A. 

      The idea of the Good was the source of all true knowledge.

    • B. 

      The world of matter was characterized as unstable, constantly changing sensory data that was untrustworthy.

    • C. 

      The real and the true can be known through the senses

    • D. 

      He taught that people should embrace ideas and reject matter to progress toward the Good. This can be achieved through use of the elenchus

  • 7. 
    Plato thought the elenchus or dialectic could be used to help people embrace ideas and become less materialistic.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Plato believed that people are born ignorant, living in a cave of shadows and illusions, chained by apathy.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    Plato believed which of the following :
    • A. 

      the human soul is born with true knowledge; however, it is lost when placed in a material body, which corrupts such knowledge

    • B. 

      The human soul is a blank slate; knowledge is impressed upon the soul after being taken in by the senses.

  • 10. 
    Plato saw a society where equal opportunity existed on all levels. Girls and boys could develop themselves to the fullest, but those who showed difficulty in abstract thinking should pursue careers that contribute to the practical realities of life, such as industry, business and military affairs. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    Socrates believed that knowing what is right automatically results in the desire to do it, even though this feature of our moral experience could be doubted
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    According to Plato,  because we perceive only their imperfect instances, we can never have genuine knowledge of truth, goodness, and beauty . 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    Plato believed that the interests of the state are best preserved if children are raised and educated by the society as a whole, rather than by their biological parents.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Plato denied that there is any systematic difference between men and women with respect to the abilities relevant to being a guardian—the capacity to understand reality and make reasonable judgments about it.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    Plato held that the perfect society will occur only when kings become philosophers or philosophers are made kings. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    The Ideas of Plato are endowed with real existence in a world superior to the world which we see. Ideas as they appear in our own mind are but the images or representations of things in this world apart. These ideas are called
    • A. 

      Cognitions

    • B. 

      Images

    • C. 

      Forms

    • D. 

      None of these

  • 17. 
    _______was born in 384 BCE at Stagirus, a Greek colony and seaport on the coast of Thrace. His father Nichomachus was court physician to King Amyntas of Macedonia, and from this began his long association with the Macedonian Court, which considerably influenced his life. 
    • A. 

      Socrates

    • B. 

      Plato

    • C. 

      Pythagoras

    • D. 

      Aristotle

  • 18. 
    At the invitation of Philip of Macedonia this philosopher became the tutor of his 13 year old son Alexander ; he did this for the five years.
    • A. 

      Socrates

    • B. 

      Plato

    • C. 

      Aristotle

    • D. 

      Isocrates

  • 19. 
    This Greek philosopher set up his own school at a place called the Lyceum. When teaching at the Lyceum, he had a habit of walking about as he discoursed. It was in connection with this that his followers became known in later years as the peripatetics, meaning “to walk about.”
    • A. 

      Socrates

    • B. 

      Plato

    • C. 

      Aristotle

    • D. 

      Isocrates

  • 20. 
    Forms are powerless to explain changes of things and a thing’s ultimate extinction. Forms are not causes of movement and alteration in the physical objects of sensation.
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

  • 21. 
    To have knowledge of a particular object, it must be knowledge of the substance which is in that things.
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

  • 22. 
    To have knowledge of a particular object, one must know the form of the thing, not through the senses, but through the elenchus.
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

  • 23. 
    For ____________, the form is not something outside the object, but rather in the varied phenomena of sense. Real substance, or true being,
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

  • 24. 
    ___________mentions supra-sensible entities he calls “Forms” (or “Ideas”). So, for example, in the Phaedo, we are told that particular sensible equal things are equal because of their “participation” or “sharing” in the character of the Form of Equality, which is absolutely, changelessly, perfectly, and essentially equal. 
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

  • 25. 
    Knowledge involves the recognition of the Forms 
    • A. 

      Plato

    • B. 

      Aristotle

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