Dogs And Kids: Do You Make The Smart Choices?

28 Questions | Total Attempts: 41

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Dogs And Kids: Do You Make The Smart Choices?

A quiz to test your knowledge of dog-kind interactions, and of hidden red flags. If you live in The Hague (Netherlands) or closeby, why not follow OhMyDog' kid-dog course? www. Ohmydogschool. Com/nl/cursussen/kind-hond-cursus/


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Dogs must obey commands from kids of 12 years old and above. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    Playing tag and other wild, chase games: what do you think? 
    • A. 

      It's fun for them both to have a bit of innocent rough-and-tumble. 

    • B. 

      This could get the dog so excited that he/she start plays too rough and hurt your kid. The dog could also make a habit of chasing running kids   Sensible dog-child interactions are calm. 

  • 3. 
    Some breeds of dogs, like Goldren Retrievers, are kid-friendly. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    This is my dog. He is in my arms. Is it OK for my kid to approach him? 
    • A. 

      It's more than OK: it's really sweet: The more the merrier. bring on the family cuddle. 

    • B. 

      The dog is effectively cornered, so it's best to give him a choice to come to your kid when he has more freedom of movement.   A cornered dog can't choose to leave if he is uncomfortable. That only increases the chance of aggression. 

  • 5. 
    My kid can do anything to my dog. My dog would never bite them. 
    • A. 

      Absolutely. He is a really good dog. 

    • B. 

      Every dog has his/her breaking point and I won't test my dog's.   I prefer that he / she enjoys my kids' company, rather than tolerate it. 

  • 6. 
    Dangling a toy in front of the dog to encourage chase. 
    • A. 

      Good idea: It gets them both to burn some energy and is excellent for their bond. 

    • B. 

      Bad idea:   Taunting the dog only encourages him/her to snatch things out of your child's hand,   Sensible games between dog and child are calm. An over-excited dog could also accidentally hurt or scare your child. 

  • 7. 
    A dog who bites a child is vicious. It is not normal. 
    • A. 

      True: a child is sacred, and dogs know that. 

    • B. 

      False: every dog can bite a child, if pushed hard enough

  • 8. 
    You see your child ride your dog like a horse. What do you do? 
    • A. 

      Quickly get a picture and put it on the social media. Precious memory and super cute!

    • B. 

      You intervene and break off this interaction.   Rare are the dogs who would enjoy this type of interaction, it could actually cause a back injury to the dog, and the dog is effectively forced to stay. 

  • 9. 
    My dog should bow to my child's will
    • A. 

      Absolutely. The dog should be under my child's control. It's a question of respect and safety. 

    • B. 

      No. Sound child-dog interactions are based on collaboration, not authority. Until a certain age, the children are not the authority figure, the parents are. 

  • 10. 
    To teach a dog to get used to kids taking away their bone: have the kid do it often. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    The dog has stolen your child's toy. He is refusing to let go. What should the child do?
    • A. 

      Call you

    • B. 

      Look the dog in the eyes then firmly take the toy away

  • 12. 
    Your dog is laying on the couch. Your kid wants to join him. How can you make this safe? 
    • A. 

      It's perfectly safe for my kid to join him, because the dog is very friendly, and he is relaxed. 

    • B. 

      I would first call the dog off the couch (nicely!), then have my kid climb on the couch and call the dog back on. That way, the dog has a choice. 

  • 13. 
    Your child is being seriously attacked by dogs (this is EXTREMELY rare). What should he/she do? 
    • A. 

      Curl up into a ball, burying his / her face between his arms, using his folded arms to protect his ears

    • B. 

      Gesticulate and shout to scare the dogs away.

  • 14. 
    This dog is really enjoying being dressed up!    Illustration source  https://www.flickr.com/photos/mccun934/2989867199 Photographer: Mike McCune https://www.flickr.com/photos/mccun934/ License: CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ No modifications made
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    Your dog is jumping up on your child (in a friendly way). What should the child do? 
    • A. 

      Fold up his/her arms against his chest and look up and away until the dog calms down. The child looking up avoids the dog jumping up against his/her chin.

    • B. 

      Say "no" loud and firmly enough that the dog knows your child is confident, and that the dog needs to obey.

  • 16. 
    The dog is relaxing or sleeping. Is this a safe moment for your child to approach the dog.    Illustration source:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/kerim/2153560882 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ Author: Kerim No modifications made
    • A. 

      Yes: That is when dogs are feeling the most relaxed. My dog always welcomes cuddle time from the little ones. 

    • B. 

      No: The dog could be startled awake. And he might be wanting some peace. Let sleeping dogs lie! 

  • 17. 
    What do you see in this picture? 
    • A. 

      I see a lot of love. Look at all that licking! Licking means kissing for dogs. 

    • B. 

      I see a puppy being restrained close to a child's face. Licking can be an appeasement signal, so the dog might not be that comfortable. 

  • 18. 
    By providing supervision (never letting a child-dog together unattended), you can prevent 99% of incidents. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    A good time to intervene in a dog-child interaction is: 
    • A. 

      Not: the dog needs to learn to get used to my child's occasional clumsiness

    • B. 

      When the dog or child is showing even subtle signs of discomfort

    • C. 

      When the dog is growling. 

  • 20. 
    What do you see in this picture? 
    • A. 

      How cute: the dog is smiling!

    • B. 

      This is a stress grin, indicating the dog is very tense. 

  • 21. 
    Your kid hugging your dog, good idea or bad idea? 
    • A. 

      Great idea! That's why I got the dog: as a companion for my kids. 

    • B. 

      Most dogs dislike being hugged because they can't walk away, and close face-to-face contact can be intimidating to them. Some like it though. 

    • C. 

      Terrible idea! Dogs should never be hugged. They all hate it. 

  • 22. 
    Your kid is teaching your dog a trick. This is how the dog looks. What do you do?
    • A. 

      They're having a great time and it's super cute. I am going to quickly take a snapshot and share it on the social media. 

    • B. 

      The dog is showing a stress signal (lip-licking), so it might be that he is feeling under pressure. I intervene and coach my kid to train more collaboratively.

  • 23. 
    My dog is reliable and wouldn't bite my kid. Ever. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 24. 
    Your dog growled at your child. What do you do? 
    • A. 

      Calmly separate them, check if your kid was bitten, work out what happened and take preventive measures for next time. Talk to a qualified canine behaviourist for that. 

    • B. 

      Shout at the dog and punish him/her.

  • 25. 
    My kids love to kiss my dog in the face. Good idea or bad idea? 
    • A. 

      So cute! That is why I got the dog: as a companion for my kids. If they can't kiss the dog, what is the use?

    • B. 

      Many dogs find close face-to-face contact intimidating. There are plenty of other ways to show a dog affection that the dog does love. 

  • 26. 
    My kids are forever picking up the dog. 
    • A. 

      It's fine. The dog is used to it. 

    • B. 

      A dog is not a toy and should have a choice about where he goes. It can also lead to dogs who tense up when approached. 

  • 27. 
    Is this appropriate child-dog interaction? 
    • A. 

      Most dogs find sustained eye contact (staring) intimidating. Best to switch to something less intense. 

    • B. 

      It is totally OK. They are looking at each other lovingly. 

  • 28. 
    What do you see here? 
    • A. 

      How cute! The dog is so relaxed he is yawning! 

    • B. 

      Yawning can be a stress signal in dogs. He might not be very comfortable with this interaction.