CST English Language Arts - Grade 8

8 Questions | Total Attempts: 150

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CST Quizzes & Trivia

End-of-course subject tests taken by students in 8th grade level.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Murphy from “Dogs That Have Known Me” How I Got to Be Perfect by Jean Kerr 1        The dog that gave us the most trouble was a beagle named Murphy. As faras I’m concerned, the first thing he did wrong was to turn into a beagle. I hadseen him bounding around on the other side of a pet-shop window, and I wentin and asked the man, “How much is that adorable fox terrier in the window?”Did he say, “That adorable fox terrier is a beagle”? No, he said, “Ten dollars,lady.” Now, I don’t mean to say one word against beagles. They have rightsjust like other people. But it is a bit of a shock when you bring home a small ball of fluff in a shoebox, and three weeks later it’s as long as the sofa. 2        Murphy was the first dog I ever trained personally, and I was delighted at the enthusiasm with which he took to the newspaper. It was sometime later that we discovered, to our horror, that—like so many dogs—hehad grasped the letter but not the spirit of the thing. Until the very end of his days he felt a real sense of obligation whenever he saw a newspaper—any newspaper—and it didn’t matter where it was. I can’t bring myself to go into the details, except to mention that we were finally compelled to keep all the papers in thebottom of the icebox. 3        He had another habit that used to leave us open to a certain amount of criticism from our friends who werenot dogophiles. He never climbed up on beds or chairs or sofas. But he always sat on top of the piano. In thebeginning we used to try to pull him off of there. But after a few noisy scuffles in which he knocked a pictureoff the wall, scratched the piano, and smashed a lamp, we just gave in—only to discover that, left to his owndevices, he hopped up and down as delicately as a ballet dancer. 4        It’s not just our own dogs that bother me. The dogs I meet at parties are even worse. I don’t know whatI’ve got that attracts them; it just doesn’t bear thought. My husband swears I rub chopped meat on my ankles.But at every party it’s the same thing. I am sitting with a group in front of the fire when all of a sudden thelarge mutt of the host appears in the archway. Then, without a single bark of warning, he hurls himself uponme. He settles down peacefully on my lap. I blow out such quantities of hair as I haven’t swallowed andglance at my host, expecting to be rescued. He murmurs, “Isn’t that wonderful? You know, Brucie is usuallyso distant with strangers.” 5        At a dinner party last week, after I had been mugged by a large sheepdog, I announced quite piteously,“Oh dear, he seems to have swallowed one of my earrings.” The hostess looked really distressed for amoment, until she examined the remaining earring. Then she said, “Oh, I think it will be all right. It’s smalland round.” 6        Nowadays if I go anywhere I just ask if they have a dog. If they do, I say, “Maybe I’d better keep awayfrom him—I have this bad allergy.” This does not really charm the lady of the house. In fact, she behavesrather as though she’d just discovered that I was back in analysis for my kleptomania. But it is safer. It really is.In paragraph 6, why does the author avoidcontact with dogs?
    • A. 

      Exposure to dogs causes her to sneeze.

    • B. 

      Dogs cause mishaps to occur.

    • C. 

      Hosts insist on saving her from their dogs.

    • D. 

      She dislikes most types of dogs.

  • 2. 
    The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe It was six men of Indostan        To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),   5     That each by observation        Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant,        And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, 10             At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant        Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk,        Cried “Ho! what have we here 15      So very round and smooth and sharp?        To me ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an Elephant        Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, 20             And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,       Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant       Is Overy like a snake!” 25      The Fourth reached out an eager hand,        And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like        Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “’Tis clear enough the Elephant 30             Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,        Said: “E’en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;        Deny the fact who can 35      This marvel of an Elephant        Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun        About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail 40             That fell within his scope, “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant        Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan        Disputed loud and long, 45      Each in his own opinion        Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right,        And all were in the wrong! [Public Domain] My Fingers by Mary O’Neill My fingers are antennae. Whatever they touch: Bud, rose, apple, Cellophane, crutch—   5     They race the feel Into my brain, Plant it there and Begin again. This is how I knew 10      Hot from cold Before I was even Two years old. This is how I can tell, Though years away 15      That elephant hide Feels leathery grey. My brain never loses A touch I bring: Frail of an eggshell, 20      Pull of a string, Beat of a pulse That tells me life Thumps in a person But not in a knife. 25      Signs that say: “Please do not touch,” Disappoint me Very much. The first stanza in “The Blind Men and theElephant” has which rhyming pattern?
    • A. 

      Abcabc

    • B. 

      Abbacc

    • C. 

      Abcbdb

    • D. 

      Aabbcc

  • 3. 
    The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe It was six men of Indostan        To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),   5     That each by observation        Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant,        And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, 10             At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant        Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk,        Cried “Ho! what have we here 15      So very round and smooth and sharp?        To me ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an Elephant        Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, 20             And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,       Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant       Is Overy like a snake!” 25      The Fourth reached out an eager hand,        And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like        Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “’Tis clear enough the Elephant 30             Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,        Said: “E’en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;        Deny the fact who can 35      This marvel of an Elephant        Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun        About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail 40             That fell within his scope, “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant        Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan        Disputed loud and long, 45      Each in his own opinion        Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right,        And all were in the wrong! [Public Domain] My Fingers by Mary O’Neill My fingers are antennae. Whatever they touch: Bud, rose, apple, Cellophane, crutch—   5     They race the feel Into my brain, Plant it there and Begin again. This is how I knew 10      Hot from cold Before I was even Two years old. This is how I can tell, Though years away 15      That elephant hide Feels leathery grey. My brain never loses A touch I bring: Frail of an eggshell, 20      Pull of a string, Beat of a pulse That tells me life Thumps in a person But not in a knife. 25      Signs that say: “Please do not touch,” Disappoint me Very much.The speaker in “My Fingers” and the men in “The Blind Men and the Elephant” both touch things
    • A. 

      Because they don’t know what an elephant is.

    • B. 

      Because it is the only way they can discover anything.

    • C. 

      In order to remember what things feel like.

    • D. 

      In order to learn things about their world.

  • 4. 
    Murphy from “Dogs That Have Known Me” How I Got to Be Perfect by Jean Kerr 1        The dog that gave us the most trouble was a beagle named Murphy. As faras I’m concerned, the first thing he did wrong was to turn into a beagle. I hadseen him bounding around on the other side of a pet-shop window, and I wentin and asked the man, “How much is that adorable fox terrier in the window?”Did he say, “That adorable fox terrier is a beagle”? No, he said, “Ten dollars,lady.” Now, I don’t mean to say one word against beagles. They have rightsjust like other people. But it is a bit of a shock when you bring home a small ball of fluff in a shoebox, and three weeks later it’s as long as the sofa. 2        Murphy was the first dog I ever trained personally, and I was delighted at the enthusiasm with which he took to the newspaper. It was sometime later that we discovered, to our horror, that—like so many dogs—hehad grasped the letter but not the spirit of the thing. Until the very end of his days he felt a real sense of obligation whenever he saw a newspaper—any newspaper—and it didn’t matter where it was. I can’t bring myself to go into the details, except to mention that we were finally compelled to keep all the papers in thebottom of the icebox. 3        He had another habit that used to leave us open to a certain amount of criticism from our friends who werenot dogophiles. He never climbed up on beds or chairs or sofas. But he always sat on top of the piano. In thebeginning we used to try to pull him off of there. But after a few noisy scuffles in which he knocked a pictureoff the wall, scratched the piano, and smashed a lamp, we just gave in—only to discover that, left to his owndevices, he hopped up and down as delicately as a ballet dancer. 4        It’s not just our own dogs that bother me. The dogs I meet at parties are even worse. I don’t know whatI’ve got that attracts them; it just doesn’t bear thought. My husband swears I rub chopped meat on my ankles.But at every party it’s the same thing. I am sitting with a group in front of the fire when all of a sudden thelarge mutt of the host appears in the archway. Then, without a single bark of warning, he hurls himself uponme. He settles down peacefully on my lap. I blow out such quantities of hair as I haven’t swallowed andglance at my host, expecting to be rescued. He murmurs, “Isn’t that wonderful? You know, Brucie is usuallyso distant with strangers.” 5        At a dinner party last week, after I had been mugged by a large sheepdog, I announced quite piteously,“Oh dear, he seems to have swallowed one of my earrings.” The hostess looked really distressed for amoment, until she examined the remaining earring. Then she said, “Oh, I think it will be all right. It’s smalland round.” 6        Nowadays if I go anywhere I just ask if they have a dog. If they do, I say, “Maybe I’d better keep awayfrom him—I have this bad allergy.” This does not really charm the lady of the house. In fact, she behavesrather as though she’d just discovered that I was back in analysis for my kleptomania. But it is safer. It really is.In paragraph 3 of the essay, the setting is important because it helps the reader understand
    • A. 

      The author’s attitude.

    • B. 

      How people react to Murphy.

    • C. 

      Murphy’s character.

    • D. 

      Why Murphy’s owners love him.

  • 5. 
    Reminiscing by Ralph Cortez 1    Watermelons were so much sweeter then, 2    When boys were the stuff of super men, 3    And summers seemed so much longer too, 4    With nothing pending and nothing due. 5    We were swordsmen—swashbuckling heroes, 6    Eternal victors—never zeroes; 7    Second basemen and clean-up hitters; 8    Forever winners, never quitters. 9    Play was a ritual in those days, 10  To go on magical mind forays, 11  To play the game with aplomb and ease, 12  To venture forth when and where we’d please. 13  We would feign death, and then rise up again. 14  Watermelons were so much sweeter then.Piano by D. H. Lawrence 1    Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me: 2    Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see 3    A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings 4    And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings. 5    In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song 6    Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong 7    To the old Sunday evenings at home, winter outside 8    And hymns in the cozy parlor, the tinkling piano our guide. 9    So now it is vain for the singer to burst into clamor 10  With the great black piano appassionato. The glamour 11  Of childish days is upon me, my manhood is cast 12  Down in the flood of remembrance, I weep like a child for the past. In lines 11 and 12 of “Piano,” the words “my manhood is cast down in the flood of remembrance” mean that the speaker feels
    • A. 

      Proud of what he has accomplished.

    • B. 

      Strongly connected to his father.

    • C. 

      That his mother relied on him when he was a child.

    • D. 

      As if he were a child.

  • 6. 
    The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe It was six men of Indostan        To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),   5     That each by observation        Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant,        And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, 10             At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant        Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk,        Cried “Ho! what have we here 15      So very round and smooth and sharp?        To me ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an Elephant        Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, 20             And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,       Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant       Is Overy like a snake!” 25      The Fourth reached out an eager hand,        And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like        Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “’Tis clear enough the Elephant 30             Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,        Said: “E’en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;        Deny the fact who can 35      This marvel of an Elephant        Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun        About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail 40             That fell within his scope, “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant        Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan        Disputed loud and long, 45      Each in his own opinion        Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right,        And all were in the wrong! [Public Domain] My Fingers by Mary O’Neill My fingers are antennae. Whatever they touch: Bud, rose, apple, Cellophane, crutch—   5     They race the feel Into my brain, Plant it there and Begin again. This is how I knew 10      Hot from cold Before I was even Two years old. This is how I can tell, Though years away 15      That elephant hide Feels leathery grey. My brain never loses A touch I bring: Frail of an eggshell, 20      Pull of a string, Beat of a pulse That tells me life Thumps in a person But not in a knife. 25      Signs that say: “Please do not touch,” Disappoint me Very much. At the end of “The Blind Men and the Elephant,” the reader is left with the impression that
    • A. 

      The men will never resolve their argument.

    • B. 

      The men will decide to examine the elephant again.

    • C. 

      Each man does not really mind that the others disagree with him.

    • D. 

      Each man is willing to listen to the opinions of the others.

  • 7. 
    The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe It was six men of Indostan        To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),   5     That each by observation        Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant,        And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, 10             At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant        Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk,        Cried “Ho! what have we here 15      So very round and smooth and sharp?        To me ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an Elephant        Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, 20             And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,       Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant       Is Overy like a snake!” 25      The Fourth reached out an eager hand,        And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like        Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “’Tis clear enough the Elephant 30             Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,        Said: “E’en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;        Deny the fact who can 35      This marvel of an Elephant        Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun        About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail 40             That fell within his scope, “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant        Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan        Disputed loud and long, 45      Each in his own opinion        Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right,        And all were in the wrong! [Public Domain] My Fingers by Mary O’Neill My fingers are antennae. Whatever they touch: Bud, rose, apple, Cellophane, crutch—   5     They race the feel Into my brain, Plant it there and Begin again. This is how I knew 10      Hot from cold Before I was even Two years old. This is how I can tell, Though years away 15      That elephant hide Feels leathery grey. My brain never loses A touch I bring: Frail of an eggshell, 20      Pull of a string, Beat of a pulse That tells me life Thumps in a person But not in a knife. 25      Signs that say: “Please do not touch,” Disappoint me Very much.Read these lines from “My Fingers.” Frail of an eggshell,Pull of a string, These lines suggest that the speaker
    • A. 

      Is a very small child.

    • B. 

      Cannot see very well.

    • C. 

      Appreciates life’s little details.

    • D. 

      Is a painter or photographer.

  • 8. 
    The Blind Men and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe It was six men of Indostan        To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),   5     That each by observation        Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant,        And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, 10             At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant        Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk,        Cried “Ho! what have we here 15      So very round and smooth and sharp?        To me ’tis mighty clear This wonder of an Elephant        Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, 20             And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,       Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant       Is Overy like a snake!” 25      The Fourth reached out an eager hand,        And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like        Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “’Tis clear enough the Elephant 30             Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,        Said: “E’en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;        Deny the fact who can 35      This marvel of an Elephant        Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun        About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail 40             That fell within his scope, “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant        Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan        Disputed loud and long, 45      Each in his own opinion        Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right,        And all were in the wrong! [Public Domain] My Fingers by Mary O’Neill My fingers are antennae. Whatever they touch: Bud, rose, apple, Cellophane, crutch—   5     They race the feel Into my brain, Plant it there and Begin again. This is how I knew 10      Hot from cold Before I was even Two years old. This is how I can tell, Though years away 15      That elephant hide Feels leathery grey. My brain never loses A touch I bring: Frail of an eggshell, 20      Pull of a string, Beat of a pulse That tells me life Thumps in a person But not in a knife. 25      Signs that say: “Please do not touch,” Disappoint me Very much. How does the speaker in “My Fingers” resemble the first man in “The Blind Men and the Elephant”?
    • A. 

      They both misunderstand what an elephant is like.

    • B. 

      They have both felt the skin of an elephant.

    • C. 

      They both know what an elephant looks like.

    • D. 

      They both have strong opinions about the nature of an elephant.