CSET English Subtest 1 Practice

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 1856

SettingsSettingsSettings
CSET English Subtest 1 Practice

CSET English subtest 1 practice test


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Read the poem below, "song at the african middle class" by Molara Ogundipe-Leslie; thenanswer the question that follows.we charge through the skies of disillusion,seeking the widening of eyes, we gaze at chaos,speak to deadened hearts and ears stopped withcommerce. We drift around our region of clowns,walking on air as dreams fly behind our eyes.we forage among broken bodies, fractured mindsto find just ways retraced and new like beaten cloth.and if they come againwill they come again?and if they come againwill they dance this time?will the new egungun1 dance once moreresplendent in rich-glassed cloth?will they be of their people's needs,rise to those needs, settle whirling riftssalve, O, festering hearts?will they say when they comeO my people, O my people, how to love you delicately?1egungun: a masqueraded dancer who dances in a religious ritual with the intention of making contact with the supernaturalThis poem best addresses which of the following concerns of contemporary African writers?
    • A. 

      The need to retain regional cultural and language differences in the face of African unification

    • B. 

      The importance of spiritual leadership and political solidarity in opposition to tyrannical dictators

    • C. 

      The matriarchal role of women in nurturing and healing future generations of Africans

    • D. 

      The spiritual and emotional bankruptcy arising from the loss of traditional values and aspirations of wealth

  • 2. 
    Literary works by postmodern Britishwriters such as Angela Carter, SalmanRushdie, and Jeanette Wintersongenerally tend to share which of thefollowing characteristics?
    • A. 

      The use of fragmented narrative structures with multiple shifts in consciousness, chronology, and location

    • B. 

      An emphasis on the rich universality of life in cultures and countries all over the world

    • C. 

      A sense of sentimental nostalgia for nineteenth- and early-twentiethcentury life, typically expressed in rueful, melancholic tones

    • D. 

      The use of brief, economic literary forms and a spare, astringent literary style

  • 3. 
    Read the passage below from Troilus and Cressida, a play by William Shakespeare; then answer the two questions that follow.In the following passage, the speaker is Ulysses, one of the Greek commanders in the war against the Trojans.When that the general is not like the hiveTo whom the foragers1 shall all repair,What honey is expected? . . .The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre2Observe degree, priority, and place, . . .And therefore is the glorious planet Sol3In noble eminence enthron'd and spher'dAmidst the other; whose med'cinable4 eyeCorrects the [ill aspects] of [planets evil],And posts5 like the commandment of a king,Sans6 check, to good and bad. But when the planetsIn evil mixture to disorder wander,What plagues and what portents, what mutiny!1foragers: workers (drones)2this centre: the earth3Sol: the sun (king of planets)4med'cinable: healing, restorative5posts: speeds6sans: without3. This passage most clearly reflects theElizabethan world view in its assertionthat:
    • A. 

      Reason is the source of all true wisdom and is godlike in its power to lead and inspire.

    • B. 

      The world's civilizations are an insignificant presence in a cosmos ruled by forces beyond human control.

    • C. 

      Mankind is fundamentally evil and civilization can be maintained only by force.

    • D. 

      Human society is part of a cosmic hierarchy in which every element has its proper role.

  • 4. 
    The ideas suggested in this passage mostclearly reflect the political context ofShakespeare's time by:
    • A. 

      Portraying a world that has been torn apart by warring factions that struggle to gain control.

    • B. 

      Showing how real power depends on the loyalty, sacrifice, and dedication of the common man.

    • C. 

      Demonstrating how laws of supply and demand regulate the nature and structure of power.

    • D. 

      Affirming the power of central authority as a unifying force to prevent political fragmentation.

  • 5. 
    Read the passage below from "An Ox Looks at Man," a poem by Carlos Drummond de Andrade; then answer the question that follows.The narrator of the poem is an ox; in the passage below, the ox considers the place of humans in the world.All their1 expression lives in their eyes—and loses itselfto a simple lowering of lids, to a shadow.And since there is little of the mountain about them—nothing in the hair or in the terribly fragile limbsbut coldness and secrecy—it is impossible for themto settle themselves into forms that are calm, lasting,and necessary. . . .1their: throughout the passage, the third-person pronouns (their, them) refer to human beingsThis passage most clearly illustrateswhich of the following poetic devices?
    • A. 

      Use of metaphor to stress the similarities between human experience and the life of animals

    • B. 

      Use of personification to critique humanity's disconnection from the natural world

    • C. 

      Use of conventions associated with the genre of the animal fable to satirize the comic foibles of human beings

    • D. 

      Use of irony to highlight the thoughtless brutality of human beings toward animals

  • 6. 
    In ancient Greek drama, the techniqueof deus ex machina may best bedescribed as:
    • A. 

      A method for solving the problems of the characters through divine intervention.

    • B. 

      An efficient technique for transporting and assembling stage scenery.

    • C. 

      A means to introduce new characters into the plot of a play without interrupting the action.

    • D. 

      A way to effect the spiritual transformation of a character in a play.

  • 7. 
    Read the passage below from Deephaven, a novel by Sarah Orne Jewett; then answer the question that follows.In the novel, the narrator and her friend Kate, who live in Boston, spend the summer in a ruralcommunity where Kate spent time as a child. In the excerpt below, the friends travel to a small town nearby to see a small circus.The circus was like all other circuses, except that it was shabbier than most, and the performers seemed to have less heart in it than usual. They did their best, and went through with their parts conscientiously, but they looked as if they never had had a good time in their lives. The audience was hilarious, and cheered and laughed at the tired clown until he looked as if he thought his speeches might possibly be funny, after all. We were so glad we had pleased the poor thing; and when he sang a song our satisfaction was still greater, and so he sang it all over again. Perhaps he had been associating with people who were used to circuses.Which of the following best describes theuse of a literary device in this passage?
    • A. 

      Figurative language helps convey the subtle levels of emotional interaction between the circus performers and the audience.

    • B. 

      Descriptive details emphasize the cynical apathy of the circus performers and their indifference to the audience.

    • C. 

      Use of the first-person point of view stresses the urban observer's sense of detachment from the circus performers and rural audience.

    • D. 

      Comic irony highlights the delight the narrator and her companion take in observing the circus performers and audience.

  • 8. 
    Read the poem below, "I Am Through" by Nguyen Trai; then answer the question that follows.I am through living with others and their tricks.I stay in the country, care only to be left alone.Bamboo and plum trees do not betray you,Monkeys and cranes are tolerant of independent souls.I pick chrysanthemums, tend orchids:Their fragrance stays in my coat.I step on the moon in search of my plum trees,The snow wets my kerchief.My ears are attuned to the harp music of the brook.As for friends, a green mountain is enough for me.Which of the following best describes themood of the poem?
    • A. 

      The speaker's vehement rejection of urban life leaves him living a life of rural deprivation.

    • B. 

      The speaker's bitter anger persists despite the temporary distractions of seasonal change.

    • C. 

      The speaker's initial loneliness and sorrow are healed through an ecstatic vision of cosmic unity.

    • D. 

      The speaker's enhanced awareness of nature's beauty eases his anger and disappointment.

  • 9. 
    Which of the following best describesa primary aim of postcolonial literarycriticism?
    • A. 

      To investigate questions relating to the cultural differences among texts

    • B. 

      To analyze ways in which themes of non-Western texts parallel themes in the Western literary tradition

    • C. 

      To consider how various texts address universal aspects of human experience

    • D. 

      To examine factors relating to the social and political background of the authors of various texts

  • 10. 
    A critic analyzing a text from a formalistperspective is likely to be concernedprimarily with the ways in which:
    • A. 

      The text's individual literary elements contribute to a coherent whole.

    • B. 

      The language of the text reflects the cultural values of the society in which the text originates.

    • C. 

      The text subverts modernist conceptions of history, reality, and truth.

    • D. 

      The language of the text is composed of arbitrary signs and symbols.

  • 11. 
    A researcher often refers to documentsthat are available both in printed formand on the Internet. In which of thefollowing situations would it be mosthelpful for the researcher to access theelectronic version of a document?
    • A. 

      The text has an extensive annotated bibliography.

    • B. 

      The researcher wants to locate specific words or phrases in the text

    • C. 

      The text contains unfamiliar technical jargon.

    • D. 

      The researcher wants to focus on the text's main ideas.

  • 12. 
    Read the excerpt below from Patrick Henry's speech of March 23, 1775, to a meeting of his fellow Virginians; then answer the two questions that follow. I know of no way of judging the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves and the House?Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation—the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motives for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been for so long forging.12. Which of the following is the main claimbeing advanced in the excerpt?
    • A. 

      Traitors are undermining the colonists' cause.

    • B. 

      The conduct of the British reflects their hostile intent

    • C. 

      Memory is short and has a tendency to deceive.

    • D. 

      The British military is overwhelming in its strength.

  • 13. 
    In this passage Patrick Henry developsthe question-and-answer organizationof the speech by using rhetoricalquestions to:
    • A. 

      Highlight the discrepancy between the conciliatory manner of the British and their warlike actions.

    • B. 

      Compare and contrast the past actions of the British with their current policies.

    • C. 

      Explore a variety of possible interpretations of the current actions of the British government.

    • D. 

      Emphasize the power of American colonists to triumph in an armed conflict with the British.

  • 14. 
    Which of the following best describes therole of revision in the writing process?
    • A. 

      Revision is a discrete phase of the writing process that should occur after the initial drafting phase.

    • B. 

      Substantive revisions should be finalized during the second-draft phase of the writing process.

    • C. 

      Revision is a recursive activity that may occur at any phase of the writing process.

    • D. 

      Substantive revision should occur primarily during the editing phase of the writing process.

  • 15. 
    A draft research paper includes a passagethat is a direct quotation from a primarysource. When reviewing the draft, theresearcher decides to interject a phrase inthe quoted material to explain a term thatmay not be familiar to modern readers.Which of the following proceduresshould the researcher use to differentiatethe inserted phrase from the quotedmaterial?
    • A. 

      Identify the inserted phrase in the footnote for the quoted material.

    • B. 

      Use ellipses to set off the inserted phrase from the quoted material.

    • C. 

      Add a footnote immediately after the inserted phrase.

    • D. 

      Enclose the inserted phrase in brackets.