Cpsc - Relational Database Design Student Assessment

12 Questions | Total Attempts: 656

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Assessment Quizzes & Trivia

This assessment is a gauge to estimate your knowledge of MS Access Relational Database Design. The results will help you and the instructor determine how you may need to spend more time learning about MS Access capabilities as they relate to Relational Database Design (building lists). After reviewing the Relational Database Design handout, take a few moments to answer the questions below. Do NOT review the material untial after you have answered the questions. Be sure that you have a thorough understanding of the questions and correct answers before attending the Access Essentials training session.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The key to understanding the database desing process lies in understanding the way a relational database management system, such as Microsoft Access
    • A. 

      Stores data

    • B. 

      Sorts data

    • C. 

      Filters data

    • D. 

      Analyzes data

  • 2. 
    You should be careful not to make mistakes during the design process because it is hard to change the design of an Access Database as you are creating it:
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    The following are signs that you should reevaluate your database design:
    • A. 

      You have one table with a large number of fields that don't all relate to the same subject.

    • B. 

      You have fields that are intentionally left blank in many records because they aren't appliable to those records.

    • C. 

      You have a large number of tables, many of which contain the same fields.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 4. 
    Some ideas for determining how a database will be used include:
    • A. 

      Talking to the people who will use the database.

    • B. 

      Brainstorming about the questions you'd like the database to answer.

    • C. 

      Sketching out the reports you'd like it to produce.

    • D. 

      Gathering the forms you currently use to record your data.

    • E. 

      All of the above.

  • 5. 
    The trickiest step in designing the database is:
    • A. 

      Identifying the end users

    • B. 

      Building forms and reports

    • C. 

      Determing the tables you'll need

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    Think of fields as:
    • A. 

      Related to addressed.

    • B. 

      Characteristics of the table.

    • C. 

      A place to store extra information that you may need later.

    • D. 

      Derived or calculated data.

  • 7. 
    Tips for determining the fields to be included in your database include:
    • A. 

      Relate each field directly to the subject of the table.

    • B. 

      Avoid derived or calculated data.

    • C. 

      Include all the information you need.

    • D. 

      Store information in its smallest logical parts.

    • E. 

      All of the above.

  • 8. 
    In database terminology, a field or set of fields that uniquely identifies each individual record stored in the table is called:
    • A. 

      The primary key of the table

    • B. 

      An identifier field

    • C. 

      The unique record

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 9. 
    A relational database management system means:
    • A. 

      That you store related data in separate tables and then define relationships between the tables.

    • B. 

      That information about relatives is stored in tables.

    • C. 

      That relationships are used to find associated information stored in the database.

    • D. 

      A and C above.

  • 10. 
    There are 3 types of relationships between tables:
    • A. 

      Parent-to-child, sister-to-brother and cousin-to-cousin relationships.

    • B. 

      Hierarchical, flat and layered relationships.

    • C. 

      One-to-many, many-to-many and one-to-one relationship.

    • D. 

      Simple, complex and multiple relationships.

  • 11. 
    Some items to check for when reviewing the initial design of your database:
    • A. 

      Did you forget any fields? Is there information that you need that isn't included? If it's information about something else, you may need to create another table.

    • B. 

      Did you choose a good primary key for each table? If you use it to search for specific records, is it easy to remember and type? Make sure that you won't need to enter a value in a primary key field that duplicates another value in the field.

    • C. 

      Are you repeatedly entering duplicate information in one of your tables? If so, you probably need to divide the table into two with a one-to-many relationship.

    • D. 

      Do you have tables with many fields, a limited number of records, and many empty fields in individual records? If so, think about redesigning the table so it has fewer fields and more records.

    • E. 

      All of the above.

  • 12. 
    Name the steps in the database design process:
    • A. 

      Purpose - determine your purpose and choose which facts to store. Tables - separate subjects such as "Manufacturer" and "Address". Fields - Decide what information to keep within each table. Relationships - Review each table and decide how the data in one table is related to the data in other tables. Analyze - your design for errors and refine if necessary.

    • B. 

      Categorize each field after deciding on your purpose and use the SAVE AS feature to insure your work is not lost. Then, sort the tables so as to eliminate any errors before printing.

    • C. 

      Purpose, tables, fields and categories are the primary steps involved ending with a careful analysis and check for errors.