Semester (Science, English, Maths) 7-8 2018

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Marina_prolygina
M
Marina_prolygina
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 7 | Total Attempts: 3,822
Questions: 60 | Attempts: 274

SettingsSettingsSettings
Semester (Science, English, Maths) 7-8 2018 - Quiz

.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Listen to the information about Oxford. Choose the correct answer.                    

  • 2. 

    Geography and History of Europe. Questions 1-20.

  • 3. 

    Questions 51-60.

  • 4. 

    He was the first superstar. Even more than that — he aroused awe and terror wherever he played. His incredible technique — he could do miracles with his violin — and his unusu­al appearance tempted many of his admirers to whisper that he was the son of the devil. 1. Although Niccolo Paganini was always the sub­ject of rumour, the secret of his power was that he worked hard since early childhood. Paganini was born in Genoa, Italy, on October 27, 1782, the third of six children born to Teresa and Antonio Paganini. The elder Paganini was in the shipping business, but he also played the mandolin and began teaching his son the violin at an early age. He raised his son with a hand of iron. He hoped that his son’s talent would bring the family fame and wealth, so he forced Niccolo to practise from morning to night. He drilled the boy constantly, even leaving him without food, if he didn’t play well enough. In 1797, Paganini started his concert tours. He earned enough money to support himself and he decided to free himself once and for all from his father’s tyranny. At 16 he left home. 2. The newly won freedom turned his head. He began to gamble. He would frequently lose more at one sitting than he earned in several weeks. More than once he had to pawn his violin to pay off a debt of honour. Once a friend lent him his own valuable Guamerius, because Niccolo’s violin was in pawn, and after that concert he asked the vio­linist to keep the instrument as a gift. Shortly after this, Paganini almost lost this famous violin in gambling. When, the following morning, he realised that he had almost gambled away his most precious possession, he swore he would never approach a gaming table again. And he kept his promise. Later he gave the violin to the people of Genoa and it is still carefully preserved in the city. 3. In spite of gambling and love affairs, Paganini continued his career. He composed, he taught, he gave concerts startling the audiences with his phe­nomenal technique. His violin could sound so soft and sweet that his audiences often burst into tears, and yet, he could perform with such force and velocity that people just couldn’t believe that a man could play like that. People said that the vio­linist must have sold his soul to the Devil and that the Devil was helping him. 4. Paganini’s appearance seemed to support this opinion. He was tall and thin, and his long pale face with its hollow cheeks and a protruding nose, his thin lips that seemed to curl into a sardonic smile, his eyes which were like flaming charcoals and his long curly hair looked a bit diabolic. Sometimes people crossed themselves if he acci­dentally touched them. At one time, Paganini was forced to publish some of his mother’s letters — to prove that he had human parents. 5. Paganini became something of a legend. He left no question as to his supremacy over all violinists of his day. Although Paganini rarely practised after his 30th birthday, he kept his brilliant technique and he still gave electrifying performances. After his concerts in Vienna, clothes, food, delicacies were named after him; his picture appeared on walking sticks and snuffboxes. In 1831, Paganini surpassed even this Vienna triumph in Paris. Franz Liszt exclaimed after his concert: “What a man! What a violin! What an artist! Heavens! What suf­ferings, what misery, what torture in those four strings!” 6. Paganini enjoyed playing tricks at his concerts. In the middle of a piece, he would cut all of the strings except for one and continue just on the one string. Another trick, usually saved for the end of the evening, was, for lack of a better term, the Paganini request hour. People from the audience could name any piece of music, and Paganini would play it. It seemed incredible that a man could remember so much music. 7. Paganini made a lot of money during his career. But in 1836, he decided to open a casino — a “Casino Paganini” — in Paris. It was a failure and he lost almost all his money. Paganini’s health had always been weak and after that his illness grew worse. He lost his voice and wasn't able to make confession before death. He died on May 27, 1840 in Nice, France. The Church refused to allow him a burial on holy ground. Paganini’s son took his father’s body to Genoa, but they were not allowed to enter the city. Only five years after Paganini’s death, his son, by appealing directly to the Pope, received permission to bury the body of the great violinist in a village church. Paganini’s genius as a player often overshadows his work as a composer, although many musicians considered that Paganini the composer was as great as Paganini the virtuoso. Still Paganini is remem­bered for the new freedom with which he played the violin — and for the mystery and rumours that followed him through his life and after death. A. The Devil's touch. B. A hardworking prodigy. C. Free to play? D. Into the depths of people's souls. E. Legendary success. F. No confession. G. Mother's wish. H. The tricks of virtuosity.

  • 5. 

    Part 2. English. Questions 21-50.

  • 6. 

    Read the article about Niccolo Paganini and choose the correct headings(A-H) for paragraphs (1-7) from the list of headings below. Write the number of the suitable headings into the spaces provided after each paragraph. One heading is extra. A. The Devil's touch. B. A  hardworking prodigy. C. Free to play? D. Into the depths of people's souls. E. Legendary success. F. No confession. G. Mother's wish. H.The tricks of virtuosity.

  • 7. 

    Task 1. Read the the text about the tower of Pisa and choose the best prepositions to complete the gaps.

  • 8. 

    Task 2. Read the the text about the railways of Europe and write the correct form of the words in brackets.

  • 9. 

    That is the end of the test. Now you can send you answers. Thank you!

  • 10. 

    There is one famous hotel in Paris. It's house number, when divided by 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6, will always leave a remainder of 1. However, when divided by 11 there is no remainder. What is the hotel's house number? ________

    Explanation
    The hotel's house number is 121. This number meets the given conditions because when divided by 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, it always leaves a remainder of 1. Additionally, when divided by 11, there is no remainder.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Europe is spread over 10,180,000 sq. km. or 3,930,000 sq. mi. and is really a land of variety. It contains huge rivers, tall mountains, and an astonishing length of coastline. In Europe you'll find hidden valleys covered with fertile soil, metals and gems to mine, oil in the North Sea, and hydro-power potential. The tallest mountain in Europe is a __________  at approximately 18,500 feet tall.

    • A.

      Mount Elbrus

    • B.

      Mont Blanc

    • C.

      Mount Etna

    • D.

      Mount Ben Nevis

    Correct Answer
    A. Mount Elbrus
    Explanation
    Europe is known for its diverse geographical features, including tall mountains. The question asks for the tallest mountain in Europe, and the correct answer is Mount Elbrus. Mount Elbrus is approximately 18,500 feet tall, making it the highest peak in Europe. It is located in the Caucasus Mountains, which stretch between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. Mount Elbrus is a popular destination for mountaineers and offers breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Politically, Europe is home to a huge number of countries: more than _____ independent countries in all. Those countries total 750 million people, with closer to 900 million if you include the parts of Russia and Turkey that are not in geographical Europe. It is therefore probably not surprising that the politics and culture of Europe is rather complex.

    • A.

      50

    • B.

      55

    • C.

      60

    • D.

      65

    Correct Answer
    A. 50
    Explanation
    Europe is home to a huge number of countries, with more than 50 independent countries in total. This number does not include the parts of Russia and Turkey that are not in geographical Europe. The fact that Europe has such a large number of countries contributes to the complexity of its politics and culture.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    Russia is the continent's largest country, while _______ is the smallest. Population-wise, the largest city of Europe is Moscow.

    • A.

      Vatican

    • B.

      Monaco

    • C.

      Malta

    • D.

      Luxemburg

    Correct Answer
    A. Vatican
    Explanation
    Russia is the largest country in Europe, both in terms of land area and population. The question asks for the smallest country in Europe, and the answer is Vatican. Vatican City is an independent city-state located within Rome, Italy. It is the smallest internationally recognized independent state in the world by both area and population.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    Europe extends from the Atlantic Ocean and Iceland in the west to the Ural Mountains of Russia in the east where it shares its border with Asia. Its northernmost point is the Svalbard archipelago of Norway in the Arctic Ocean, and it reaches as far south as _______.

    • A.

      The Mediterranean Sea

    • B.

      The Black Sea

    • C.

      The Pacific Ocean

    • D.

      The Red Sea

    Correct Answer
    A. The Mediterranean Sea
    Explanation
    Europe reaches as far south as the Mediterranean Sea.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    The Geography of Europe Understanding the geography of Europe is an important part of understanding the world. Europe is a continent of many countries and different peoples.  It is also a continent of peninsulas, islands, and varied landforms. It is _______  of the seven continents of the world, according to area, and  it is the third most populous continent, ranking after Asia and Africa. The population of Europe is approximately 857 million, which is about 11% of the world's population.

    • A.

      The biggest

    • B.

      The second biggest

    • C.

      The second smallest

    • D.

      The smallest

    Correct Answer
    C. The second smallest
    Explanation
    Europe is the second smallest continent in terms of area. It is smaller than Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Antarctica. Europe's small size is evident when compared to the other continents. It is important to understand the geography of Europe because it is home to many countries with diverse cultures and landscapes.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    Europe has four main landforms, many  islands and peninsulas, and various climate types. The four main landforms include the Alpine region, Central Uplands, Northern Lowlands, and Western Highlands. Each represents a different physical part of Europe. Five peninsulas are a part of the European continent namely Balkan Peninsula, Iberian Peninsula, Scandinavian Peninsula, Jutland Peninsula and the ______ Peninsula.

    • A.

      Arabian Peninsula

    • B.

      Deccan Peninsula

    • C.

      Apennine Peninsula

    • D.

      Labrador Peninsula

    Correct Answer
    C. Apennine Peninsula
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Apennine Peninsula. The question states that there are five peninsulas that are part of the European continent, and it lists four of them (Balkan Peninsula, Iberian Peninsula, Scandinavian Peninsula, Jutland Peninsula). Therefore, the missing peninsula must be the Apennine Peninsula.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    Expanding Brackets Codebreaker Look at the code.

    Correct Answer
    EUROPE IS MAGIC, Europe is magic
  • 18. 

    My watch was correct at midnight, after which it began to lose 12 minutes per hour, until 7 hours ago it stopped completely. It now shows the time as 3.12. What is now the correct time?

    • A.

      10 a.m.

    • B.

      10.12

    • C.

      11 a.m.

    Correct Answer
    C. 11 a.m.
    Explanation
    The watch started losing 12 minutes per hour after midnight. Since it now shows the time as 3.12, it means that 3 hours and 12 minutes have passed since midnight. Subtracting this time from the current time of 7 hours ago, we get the correct time as 11 a.m.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    The town was named Oxford because ...  

    • A.

      There was a famous Oxford bridge.

    • B.

      It was a famous farming place.

    • C.

      It was a place where oxen could cross the River Thames.

    Correct Answer
    C. It was a place where oxen could cross the River Thames.
    Explanation
    The town was named Oxford because it was a place where oxen could cross the River Thames. This suggests that the town was named after its geographical location and its significance as a crossing point for oxen. The presence of a bridge or its reputation as a farming place are not mentioned as reasons for the town's name.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    The most famous college in Oxford is ....

    • A.

      Christchurch college.

    • B.

      Wolsey college.

    • C.

      Wren college.

    Correct Answer
    A. Christchurch college.
    Explanation
    Christchurch college is the most famous college in Oxford. This can be attributed to its historical significance and prestigious reputation. Founded in 1546, Christchurch is one of the largest and oldest colleges in Oxford. It has produced numerous notable alumni, including several prime ministers and renowned writers. The college's stunning architecture, beautiful gardens, and iconic landmarks, such as the Christ Church Cathedral, also contribute to its fame. Overall, Christchurch college's rich history, academic excellence, and cultural significance make it the most famous college in Oxford.

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    It has got its academic status in 1167 because ...

    • A.

      This year the campus was built.

    • B.

      This year all English students were expelled from the University of Paris.

    • C.

      This year a lot of French people settled in Oxford.

    Correct Answer
    B. This year all English students were expelled from the University of Paris.
    Explanation
    In 1167, Oxford University gained its academic status because all English students were expelled from the University of Paris. This event led to an influx of students and scholars seeking education elsewhere, and Oxford became a prominent center for learning.

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    The college is also famous because ...

    • A.

      Some of its locations were used in the film about Harry Porter.

    • B.

      Alice Liddell, a prototype of Alice in Wonderland, studied there.

    • C.

      A famous writer Lewis Carroll was one of its deans.

    Correct Answer
    A. Some of its locations were used in the film about Harry Porter.
    Explanation
    The college is famous because some of its locations were used in the film about Harry Potter. This suggests that the college has a significant connection to the popular Harry Potter franchise, which has a large and dedicated fan base. The use of the college's locations in the film adds to its fame and may attract fans of the series to visit and explore the college. This connection to such a successful and beloved film series can enhance the college's reputation and make it a popular tourist destination.

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    The tower over the main entrance of the college is named the Tom Tower because ...

    • A.

      It was designed by Sir Christopher Wren.

    • B.

      It has a huge bell inside called Tom.

    • C.

      The name of the engineer was Tom.

    Correct Answer
    B. It has a huge bell inside called Tom.
    Explanation
    The tower over the main entrance of the college is named the Tom Tower because it has a huge bell inside called Tom. This suggests that the tower was named after the bell inside it, which is referred to as Tom.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    3 boxes with chocolate candies: one of them contained white chocolate candies, another one milk chocolate candies, and the third box contained the mixture of both kinds. What minimal number and from which box should be taken to determine the flavor of each box, considering the fact that ALL the labels on the boxes are mixed? Write the number (in figures) and the box flavour (white/milk/mixed). Answer: ________ candy/ies from a ________ box.

    Correct Answer
    1
    mixed
    Explanation
    To determine the flavor of each box, we need to choose candies from one box. Since the labels on the boxes are mixed, we cannot rely on the labels to determine the flavor. Taking one candy from the mixed box will allow us to identify the flavor of that box.

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    Europe is known for its diversity even when it comes to the climate. Central and eastern region of the continent is known for its ________ climate, where the extremes can be observed. In summers its warm to hot, whereas in winter the region gets cold. It is the southern region of the continent, which is blessed with the best climate, as it has Mediterranean climate. As compared to most other parts, the winters are mild, although the area does experience light snow and rain.

    • A.

      Extremal

    • B.

      Continental

    • C.

      Sub-tropical

    • D.

      Tropical

    Correct Answer
    B. Continental
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "continental" because the passage describes the climate in the central and eastern region of Europe as having extremes, with warm to hot summers and cold winters. This suggests a continental climate, which is characterized by a wide range of temperatures throughout the year. The other options, such as "extremal," "sub-tropical," and "tropical," do not accurately describe the climate patterns mentioned in the passage.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    Europe is made up of many political and economic alliances. The most important of these is the European Union. The European Union (EU) is a political and economic alliance between 28 of the countries of Europe. 19 countries of Europe have a single currency called the euro. Some countries still use their own money.  Which currency is not of a European country?

    • A.

      Dinar

    • B.

      Leo

    • C.

      Riyal

    • D.

      Lei

    Correct Answer
    C. Riyal
    Explanation
    The currency "Riyal" is not of a European country. While "Dinar" is the currency of several European countries such as Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, "Leo" is not a recognized currency, and "Lei" is the currency of Romania.

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    The longest river in Europe is Volga, but  __________ are also significant. Both have their origins in the region of southern Germany .

    • A.

      The Danube and the Dnieper

    • B.

      The Dnieper and the Rhine

    • C.

      The Danube and the Rhine

    • D.

      The Rhine and the Elbe

    Correct Answer
    C. The Danube and the Rhine
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Danube and the Rhine. Both rivers are significant in Europe and have their origins in the region of southern Germany.

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    This lady was the queen of France and Scotland, as well as could become the queen of England.

    • A.

      Bloody Mary

    • B.

      Mary Magdalene

    • C.

      Mary Stuart

    • D.

      Marie de' Medici

    Correct Answer
    C. Mary Stuart
    Explanation
    Mary Stuart, also known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was the queen of France and Scotland. She had a claim to the English throne and could potentially become the queen of England. She was a prominent figure in European politics during the 16th century and her reign was marked by political and religious conflicts. Despite her aspirations, she was ultimately unsuccessful in securing the English throne and faced numerous challenges throughout her life, including imprisonment and execution.

    Rate this question:

  • 29. 

    “The State, That’s Me,” said this dancing king.

    • A.

      Henry IV of France

    • B.

      Louis XIV of France

    • C.

      Frederick the Great

    • D.

      Alexander I of Russia

    Correct Answer
    B. Louis XIV of France
    Explanation
    Louis XIV of France famously declared, "The State, That's Me," highlighting his belief in absolute monarchy and his centralized control over the state. This statement reflects his belief that he embodied the power and authority of the state, effectively making him the personification of France. Known as the Sun King, Louis XIV ruled for over 70 years and implemented policies that strengthened the monarchy and centralized power, solidifying his position as one of the most influential monarchs in French history.

    Rate this question:

  • 30. 

    Give the correct definition to the state which consolidated almost all Central European lands in the XVII-XVIIIth centuries.

    • A.

      German Empire

    • B.

      Austrian Empire

    • C.

      Holy Empire

    • D.

      Holy Roman Empire

    Correct Answer
    D. Holy Roman Empire
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Holy Roman Empire. The Holy Roman Empire was a political entity that existed in Central Europe from the 9th century to the 19th century. It was not truly Roman or an empire in the traditional sense, but rather a loose confederation of territories governed by an elected Holy Roman Emperor. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the Holy Roman Empire consolidated most of the Central European lands under its rule, making it the correct definition for the state described in the question.

    Rate this question:

  • 31. 

    The Peace of Westphalia ended a 17th century conflict that devastated present-day Germany. What conflict did it end?

    • A.

      Hundred Years’ War

    • B.

      Thirty Years’ War

    • C.

      Seven Years’ War

    • D.

      World War I

    Correct Answer
    B. Thirty Years’ War
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Thirty Years' War. The Peace of Westphalia, signed in 1648, marked the end of this devastating conflict that took place in present-day Germany. The war was fought primarily within the Holy Roman Empire and involved various European powers, including France, Spain, and Sweden. The Peace of Westphalia established a new balance of power in Europe and introduced the principle of state sovereignty, which greatly influenced international relations.

    Rate this question:

  • 32. 

    The House of Bourbon belongs to the dynasty of…  

    • A.

      Capetians

    • B.

      Carolings

    • C.

      Merovingians

    • D.

      Bonapartes

    Correct Answer
    A. Capetians
    Explanation
    The House of Bourbon belongs to the dynasty of Capetians. The Capetians were a medieval dynasty that ruled over the Kingdom of France from the 10th century until the French Revolution in the late 18th century. The House of Bourbon was a branch of the Capetian dynasty and became one of the most powerful and influential royal families in Europe. They ruled over France for several centuries, with notable members including King Louis XIV, known as the Sun King, and King Louis XVI, who was executed during the French Revolution.

    Rate this question:

  • 33. 

    All the European countries are rich with traditions, cultural heritages and captivating views. In what country can you see all these landmarks?

    • A.

      Czech Republic

    • B.

      Spain

    • C.

      Austria

    • D.

      France

    Correct Answer
    C. Austria
    Explanation
    Austria is the correct answer because it is known for its rich traditions, cultural heritage, and captivating views. The country is famous for its stunning landmarks such as the historic city of Vienna, the beautiful Alps, and the iconic Schönbrunn Palace. Austria offers a unique blend of history, culture, and natural beauty, making it an ideal destination for those seeking to experience European traditions and landmarks.

    Rate this question:

  • 34. 

    Which Russian city was built to be a seaport and a “window on Europe”?

    • A.

      Moscow

    • B.

      Kaliningrad

    • C.

      St.  Petersburg

    • D.

      Vladivostok

    Correct Answer
    C. St.  Petersburg
    Explanation
    St. Petersburg was built to be a seaport and a "window on Europe" because it was strategically located on the Baltic Sea, providing Russia with direct access to Europe. The city was founded by Peter the Great in 1703 with the intention of creating a modern, Westernized capital that would showcase Russia's connection to European culture and trade. St. Petersburg's architecture, layout, and cultural institutions were all designed to reflect this European influence, making it a significant cultural and economic hub for Russia.

    Rate this question:

  • 35. 

    Paragraph 1 ________

    Correct Answer
    B, b
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "B, b" because the question asks for the answer to "Paragraph 1" and the only option provided is "B, b." Therefore, "B, b" is the correct answer for this question.

    Rate this question:

  • 36. 

    Paragraph 2 ________

    Correct Answer
    C, c
    Explanation
    The given answer is C, c. However, without any context or additional information provided in the question, it is difficult to determine the exact explanation for this answer. It is possible that the question is asking for a specific letter or character that is missing in the paragraph, and the correct answer is C, c because it is the missing element. However, without more information, it is not possible to provide a definitive explanation.

    Rate this question:

  • 37. 

    Paragraph 4 ________

    Correct Answer
    A, a
  • 38. 

    Paragraph 3 ________

    Correct Answer
    D, d
  • 39. 

    After visiting Spain the tourist had decided to enlarge the photograph of the Sagrada Familia.  The original is 7.5 cm by 6.5 cm. If the enlargement of the longest side is 18 cm, what is the length of the smaller side?

    • A.

      16.8 cm

    • B.

      15.6 cm

    • C.

      16.5 cm

    Correct Answer
    B. 15.6 cm
    Explanation
    The length of the smaller side can be determined by finding the scale factor between the original photograph and the enlargement. The scale factor is calculated by dividing the length of the longest side of the enlargement (18 cm) by the length of the corresponding side in the original photograph (7.5 cm). The result is approximately 2.4. Therefore, to find the length of the smaller side in the enlargement, we multiply the length of the corresponding side in the original photograph (6.5 cm) by the scale factor. The result is approximately 15.6 cm.

    Rate this question:

  • 40. 

    Eleven members of Carlton club each paid the same amount for a guest speaker to talk about history at their club meeting. They paid their guest speaker £1А2.  What is the missing digit A of this 3-digit number?

    • A.

      0

    • B.

      1

    • C.

      2

    • D.

      3

    • E.

      4

    Correct Answer
    D. 3
  • 41. 

    Six rectangles in the old historical tile in Portugal have a common base width of 2 and lengths of 1, 4, 9, 16, 25 and 38. What is the sum of the areas of the six rectangles? ________

    Correct Answer
    186
    Explanation
    The sum of the areas of the six rectangles can be found by multiplying the base width of 2 with each of the lengths given and then adding them together. The areas of the rectangles would be 2*1, 2*4, 2*9, 2*16, 2*25, and 2*38. Adding these areas together gives a sum of 186.

    Rate this question:

  • 42. 

    The cost of a three-course lunch in one Belgium restaraunt was €14.00. The main course cost twice as much as the sweet, and the sweet cost twice as much as the starter. How much did the main course cost? Answer: € ________.

    Correct Answer
    8
    Explanation
    The main course cost €8. This can be determined by setting up a system of equations based on the given information. Let's assume the cost of the starter is x. According to the information given, the sweet would cost 2x and the main course would cost 2(2x) = 4x. The total cost of the three courses is €14, so we can write the equation x + 2x + 4x = 14. Simplifying this equation gives 7x = 14, and solving for x gives x = 2. Therefore, the main course, which costs 4x, would be 4(2) = €8.

    Rate this question:

  • 43. 

    All of the colleges in Oxford became co-ed ...

    • A.

      In 1918.

    • B.

      In 1980.

    • C.

      In 2008.

    Correct Answer
    C. In 2008.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "in 2008." This suggests that prior to 2008, not all of the colleges in Oxford were co-ed. It implies that there was a change or transition that occurred in 2008, resulting in all of the colleges becoming co-ed.

    Rate this question:

  • 44. 

    The highest spire in Great Britain is that of the church of St Mary, called Salisbury Cathedral, in Wiltshire, England. The cathedral was completed and consecrated in 1258; the spire was added from 1334 to 1365 and reaches a height of 202 feet, plus half its own height. How tall is the spire of Salisbury Cathedral? Answer: ________ feet.

    Correct Answer
    404
    Explanation
    The spire of Salisbury Cathedral is 404 feet tall.

    Rate this question:

  • 45. 

    The rivers provide water for Europe’s farms. Wheat and barley are two of Europe’s major crops. Southern Europe specializes in fruits, vegetables, olives, and wines. Other crops include oats, corn, sugar beets, and potatoes. Northern regions like  Iceland and Norway are rich with _____ . Europe is one of the world’s major industrial regions.

    • A.

      Oil and gas

    • B.

      Coal

    • C.

      Fish

    • D.

      Forests

    Correct Answer
    C. Fish
    Explanation
    Europe's northern regions like Iceland and Norway are rich with fish. This is because these regions have abundant coastal waters and cold ocean currents that support a thriving fishing industry. Fishing is an important economic activity in these areas and contributes to Europe's overall food production and economy. Additionally, Europe is known for its major industrial regions, but the given information does not provide any specific details about the industries present in Europe.

    Rate this question:

  • 46. 

    Place the following British dynasties in the chronological order: A. Hanover    B. Windsors    C. Saxe-Coburg and Gotha    D. Stuarts  

    • A.

      ABCD

    • B.

      DCBA

    • C.

      CADB

    • D.

      DACB

    Correct Answer
    D. DACB
    Explanation
    The correct chronological order of the British dynasties is DACB. The Stuarts were the ruling dynasty in England from 1603 to 1714. They were followed by the Hanover dynasty, also known as the House of Hanover, which ruled from 1714 to 1901. The Saxe-Coburg and Gotha dynasty, also known as the House of Windsor, came next and has been the ruling dynasty since 1901. Therefore, the correct order is DACB.

    Rate this question:

  • 47. 

    Getting around Did you know that railways were invented in Europe? It was in England that George Stephenson introduced the ________ (one) passenger train in 1825.

    Correct Answer
    first
    Explanation
    George Stephenson introduced the first passenger train in England in 1825. This suggests that before this time, there were no passenger trains in existence. The word "first" indicates that this was the initial introduction of passenger trains, implying that there were subsequent trains developed after this one.

    Rate this question:

  • 48. 

    His most famous locomotive ________ (call) ‘the Rocket’ and it reached speeds of more than 40 kilometres per hour (km/h) – which was really fast for those days.

    Correct Answer
    was called
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "was called". This is because the sentence is referring to a past event and is describing the name of the locomotive. The verb "called" is in the past tense, indicating that the name of the locomotive was given in the past.

    Rate this question:

  • 49. 

    Today, Europe’s high-speed electric trains ________ (to be) very different from those first steam engines.

    Correct Answer
    are
    Explanation
    The sentence is discussing the current state of Europe's high-speed electric trains in comparison to the first steam engines. The verb "are" is the correct form to use with the subject "Europe's high-speed electric trains" to indicate that they currently exist and have certain characteristics that are different from the first steam engines.

    Rate this question:

  • 50. 

    They are very comfortable and they travel at speeds of up to 330 km/h on specially built tracks. More tracks are being built all the time, to allow people to travel ________ (quick) between Europe’s big cities.

    Correct Answer
    quickly, quicker
    Explanation
    The question is asking for a word that means "fast" to fill in the blank. The word "quickly" is an adverb that means "in a fast manner," and "quicker" is the comparative form of the adjective "quick," which also means "fast." Both words accurately describe the speed at which people can travel between Europe's big cities on the specially built tracks.

    Rate this question:

Related Topics

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.