Trivia Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Ocean Currents And Climate?

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Trivia Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Ocean Currents And Climate? - Quiz

How Much Do You Know About Ocean Currents And Climate? The quiz below is designed to test out just how much you got to understand the effect that ocean currents have over the world’s climate. Ocean currents are formed as a result of the movement of ocean water in a definite direction. Take this quiz and learn more about them!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Two types of surface currents are the Gulf Stream and the

    • A.

      Brazil Current

    • B.

      Antarctic Bottom Water

    • C.

      Coriolis Effect

    • D.

      North Atlantic Deep Water

    Correct Answer
    A. Brazil Current
    Explanation
    The Brazil Current is a type of surface current that flows along the eastern coast of South America. It is a warm current that transports warm water from the equator towards the southern Atlantic Ocean. The Gulf Stream, on the other hand, is a warm current that flows along the eastern coast of North America and transports warm water from the Gulf of Mexico towards the North Atlantic Ocean. The other options, Antarctic Bottom Water and North Atlantic Deep Water, are not surface currents but rather deep ocean currents. The Coriolis Effect is a phenomenon that influences the direction of ocean currents but is not a type of surface current itself.

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  • 2. 

    Surface currents are caused by

    • A.

      Floods

    • B.

      The wind

    • C.

      Warm water

    • D.

      The equator

    Correct Answer
    B. The wind
    Explanation
    Surface currents are caused by the wind. The wind exerts a force on the surface of the ocean, pushing the water in the direction of the wind. This creates a flow of water known as a surface current. The strength and direction of the wind determine the speed and direction of the surface current. Surface currents play a crucial role in redistributing heat around the Earth, influencing climate patterns and affecting marine ecosystems.

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  • 3. 

    Ocean currents flow from east to west near the

    • A.

      Gulf stream

    • B.

      Poles

    • C.

      Equator

    • D.

      Global winds

    Correct Answer
    C. Equator
    Explanation
    Ocean currents flow from east to west near the equator due to the influence of the trade winds. The trade winds blow from the east towards the west in the tropics, causing the surface waters of the ocean to move in the same direction. This creates a westward flow of water near the equator, known as the Equatorial Currents. These currents play a significant role in redistributing heat around the globe and influencing climate patterns.

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  • 4. 

    The curved paths of global winds and surface currents are caused by

    • A.

      The rotation of the Earth

    • B.

      The Coriolis effect

    • C.

      Warm air near the equator

    • D.

      Continental deflection

    Correct Answer
    B. The Coriolis effect
    Explanation
    The curved paths of global winds and surface currents are caused by the Coriolis effect. The Coriolis effect is a result of the rotation of the Earth, which causes moving objects, such as air and water, to be deflected to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. This deflection is responsible for the curved paths observed in global wind patterns and ocean currents.

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  • 5. 

    Ocean currents in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres turn

    • A.

      From west to east

    • B.

      Clockwise

    • C.

      In opposite directions

    • D.

      Against the Earth's rotation

    Correct Answer
    C. In opposite directions
    Explanation
    Ocean currents in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres turn in opposite directions. This is because of the Coriolis effect, which is caused by the rotation of the Earth. In the Northern Hemisphere, ocean currents are deflected to the right, while in the Southern Hemisphere, they are deflected to the left. This deflection results in the currents moving in opposite directions in the two hemispheres.

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  • 6. 

    What does a surface current do when it deflects?

    • A.

      Gains speed

    • B.

      Moves toward cold water

    • C.

      Meets another ocean current

    • D.

      Changes direction

    Correct Answer
    D. Changes direction
    Explanation
    When a surface current deflects, it changes direction. This means that it deviates from its original path and moves in a different direction. The deflection can occur due to various factors such as the rotation of the Earth, the presence of landmasses, or the interaction with other ocean currents. This change in direction is an important characteristic of surface currents and plays a significant role in the circulation of heat and nutrients in the ocean.

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  • 7. 

    The density of ocean water increases when it

    • A.

      Joins the Gulf Stream

    • B.

      Gets colder

    • C.

      Gets warmer

    • D.

      Turns to ice

    Correct Answer
    B. Gets colder
    Explanation
    When ocean water gets colder, its density increases. This is because cold water is denser than warm water. As the temperature of the water decreases, the water molecules move slower and become more closely packed together, resulting in an increase in density. This increase in density has important implications for ocean circulation and the formation of deep water currents.

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  • 8. 

    Which process increases the salinity of ocean water?

    • A.

      The Coriolis effect

    • B.

      Convection currents

    • C.

      Evaporation

    • D.

      Continental deflection

    Correct Answer
    C. Evaporation
    Explanation
    Evaporation is the process that increases the salinity of ocean water. When water from the ocean surface evaporates, it leaves behind the dissolved salts, increasing the concentration of salt in the remaining water. This process is one of the main factors contributing to the high salinity of ocean water. The other options, such as the Coriolis effect, convection currents, and continental deflection, do not directly affect the salinity of ocean water.

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  • 9. 

    As water getss denser, how does it move?

    • A.

      Expands toward wamer water

    • B.

      Gets pushed toward the poles

    • C.

      Sinks toward the ocean floor

    • D.

      Gets pulled up by evaporation

    Correct Answer
    C. Sinks toward the ocean floor
    Explanation
    As water gets denser, it sinks toward the ocean floor. This is because as water becomes colder, its molecules come closer together, increasing its density. The denser water then sinks below the less dense water, moving towards the ocean floor. This process is known as thermohaline circulation and plays a crucial role in the global oceanic circulation patterns.

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  • 10. 

    Which currents carry warm water away from the equator?

    • A.

      Deep currents

    • B.

      Evaporation

    • C.

      Surface currents

    • D.

      Freezing

    Correct Answer
    C. Surface currents
    Explanation
    Surface currents carry warm water away from the equator. These currents are driven by wind patterns and the Earth's rotation. Warm water from the equator is pushed towards the poles by these surface currents, redistributing heat and affecting global climate patterns. Deep currents, on the other hand, are driven by differences in water density and are responsible for the movement of cold water from the poles towards the equator. Evaporation and freezing are not directly related to the movement of warm water away from the equator.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 08, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Jwrussell98
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