Building Technology 4- Division 4 Masonry

54 Questions | Total Attempts: 227

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Masonry Quizzes & Trivia

The type of concrete you use varies with the purpose of the building and if not used correctly can lead to collapse of the building. Have you just covered division 3 on concrete under the building technology 3 class? Take up the test below and see how much of it you understand so far.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
     is highly decorative type of plaster work developed in Italy during theRenaissance. This type of technique consists of applying two or three thin coats of plasterdifferent colors and then cutting away certain areas of one or two coats to produce athree-dimensional colored design.
    • A. 

      Portland cement plaster

    • B. 

      Sgrafitto

    • C. 

      Gypsum plater

    • D. 

      Lime plaster

  • 2. 
     defines the aggregates used in concrete masonry units.
    • A. 

      ASTM C200

    • B. 

      ASTM C150

    • C. 

      ASTM- C331

    • D. 

      ASTM C330

  • 3. 
     are hollow masonry units, open at two ends withinterior webs or partitions 19mm (¾”) to 25mm (1”) dividing the blockinto longitudinal cells
    • A. 

      Plaster block

    • B. 

      Durisol block

    • C. 

      Structural clay tile

    • D. 

      HARDCORE block

    • E. 

      Concrete block

  • 4. 
    __________is a mortar of cementitious material (lime, gypsum or cement), sand and water which is applied in coats (layers) to masonry surfaces, lath or various types of plaster board to give a hard finish surface to interior or exterior walls and ceilings
    • A. 

      Plaster

    • B. 

      Cement mortar

    • C. 

      Grout

  • 5. 
    _________ is mortar applied to wall surfaces as a preparation or a hard finish coat.
    • A. 

      Plaster

    • B. 

      Grout

    • C. 

      Cement

  • 6. 
    ________ is lightweight block made fromfiber and cement. “DURISOL” block units aretwo-core, 100mm (4”) or 150mm ( 6”) x 87mm (7-1/2”) x 600mm (24”).
    • A. 

      Durisol block

    • B. 

      Concrete block

    • C. 

      Panaflex block

    • D. 

      HARDCORE block

    • E. 

      Plaster block

  • 7. 
    _______ is a proportioned mixture of siliceous materials (sand, crushed stone) and cement (lime,Portland) which, after being prepared in a plastic state with water, hardens into a stonelike mass.
    • A. 

      Mortar

    • B. 

      Cement

    • C. 

      Plaster

    • D. 

      Grout

  • 8. 
    These have a smooth outer surface with a dull satin or high gloss finish.They are load bearing, fire resisting, and impervious. They are usually formed withvertical hollow cores through the body with scoring on theback.
    • A. 

      Glazed brick

    • B. 

      Facing brick

    • C. 

      Common or building brick

    • D. 

      Fire (refractory) brick.

  • 9. 
    These are ordinarily made from amixture of flint clay and plastic clay, and are used for thelining of furnaces, fireplaces, and chimneys.
    • A. 

      Glazed brick

    • B. 

      Facing brick

    • C. 

      Common or building brick

    • D. 

      Fire (refractory) brick.

  • 10. 
    The horizontal surfaces on which the stones or bricks of walls lie in the courses
    • A. 

      Course

    • B. 

      Bed

    • C. 

      Wythe or Tier

    • D. 

      Bond

  • 11. 
    The corner stones at the angles of buildings, usually rusticated so as to project fromthe normal surface of the wall.
    • A. 

      Blocking or Blocking Course

    • B. 

      Quoins

    • C. 

      Bond Stones

    • D. 

      Heading course

  • 12. 
    The bricks are laid diagonally to form a herring-bone pattern.
    • A. 

      Common Bond

    • B. 

      English Bond.

    • C. 

      Flemish Bond.

    • D. 

      Herring-bone

  • 13. 
    That connection between bricks, stones or other masonry units formed by lappingthem one upon another carrying up the work, so as to form an inseparable mass of building,by preventing the vertical joints falling over each other (also called a breaking joint).
    • A. 

      Bed

    • B. 

      Course

    • C. 

      Wythe or Tier

    • D. 

      Bond

  • 14. 
    Stones running through the thickness of the wall at right angles to its face, inorder to bind it together.
    • A. 

      Blocking or Blocking Course

    • B. 

      Quoins

    • C. 

      Bond Stones

    • D. 

      Heading course

  • 15. 
    Stones fitted together at random withoutany attempt to lay them in course.
    • A. 

      Rubble work.

    • B. 

      Random work

    • C. 

      Ashlar.

    • D. 

      Rustic or Rock work.

  • 16. 
    Squared stones in regular courses, in contradistinction to rubble work.
    • A. 

      Rubble work.

    • B. 

      Random work

    • C. 

      Ashlar.

    • D. 

      Rustic or Rock work.

  • 17. 
    Specially processed to give certain specific surface characteristics. Usedfor exposed masonry surfaces.
    • A. 

      Glazed brick.

    • B. 

      Facing brick.

    • C. 

      Common or building brick

    • D. 

      Fire (refractory) brick.

  • 18. 
    Same as gypsum plaster but mixed to meet established standards. Mixed on the job with water, sand, lime putty, hair or fiber for two and three-coat finish surfaces for both exteriors and interiors.
    • A. 

      High-strength gypsum plaster.

    • B. 

      Lightweight gypsum plaster, fire-resistant plaster.

    • C. 

      Prepared gypsum plaster

    • D. 

      Bonding plaster.

    • E. 

      Fibered gypsum plaster.

  • 19. 
    Reinforcement for 100mm (4”) and150mm (6”) wall  concrete blocks  shall be 10mm (3/8”) ∅ vertical bars at 600mm (24”) on centers and 3/8”∅ horizontal bars every_____ course.
    • A. 

      Second course

    • B. 

      Third course

    • C. 

      First course

    • D. 

      Fourth course

  • 20. 
    Plastering is done according to two basic methods: two-coat and three-coat. A three-coat job consists of a second binding coat called 
    • A. 

      Scratch coat

    • B. 

      Brown-coat

    • C. 

      Finish coat

  • 21. 
    Plastering is done according to two basic methods: two-coat and three-coat. A three-coat job consists of a first binding coat called 
    • A. 

      Scratch coat

    • B. 

      Brown-coat

    • C. 

      Finish coat

  • 22. 
    Plaster of Paris mixed with clay, lime and other materials incombinations covered by trademarks or patents. Mixed on the job with water, sand,lime putty, hair or fiber for two or three-coat finish surfaces for interior walls andceilings; or used dry as ingredient for hard or sand float finish with lime plaster
    • A. 

      Gypsum plaster

    • B. 

      Cement plaster

    • C. 

      High-strength gypsum plaster.

    • D. 

      Fibered gypsum plaster.

  • 23. 
    Plaster of Paris mixed with alum or borax or other materials andburned (calcined) at 932°F. Mixed on the job with water, lime putty and fine whitesand as hard finish for two and three-coat gypsum plaster. For interior use only
    • A. 

      Fibered gypsum plaster

    • B. 

      Keene's cement

    • C. 

      Molding plaster.

    • D. 

      Acoustics plaster.

    • E. 

      Plaster of Paris.

  • 24. 
    Plaster For ornamental plaster work and castings
    • A. 

      Fibered gypsum plaster

    • B. 

      Keene's cement

    • C. 

      Molding plaster.

    • D. 

      Acoustics plaster.

    • E. 

      Plaster of Paris.

  • 25. 
    Mixed with water, sand and lime putty. Used for two and three-coat finish surfaces forexterior and interior walls and ceilings.
    • A. 

      Portland cement plaster

    • B. 

      Sgrafitto

    • C. 

      Gypsum plater

    • D. 

      Lime plaster

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