Building Laws Trivia Questions! Quiz

12 Questions | Total Attempts: 136

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Building Laws Trivia Questions! Quiz

What do you know about building laws? How much do you think you know to pass this quiz? Building laws are the rules and regulations made by town planning authorities covering the requirements of the building, safeguarding the safety of the public through open spaces. The rules control the activity of the building. Building laws are technically called building codes. Taking on this quiz will help you learn more about building laws.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    At the time scheduled for bid opening, a contractor comes rushing into the room three minutes late with his bid.  You have not begun to open the bids.  What should you do?
    • A. 

      Refuse to accept the bid, stating that the deadline has passed.

    • B. 

      Ask if there are no objections from the other bidders to accept the bid since none has been opened yet.

    • C. 

      Accept the bid with prejudice.

    • D. 

      Accept the bid since none has been opened but make a mental note to look on it with disfavor when you are evaluating it.

  • 2. 
    Which of the following is not generally true about bidding?
    • A. 

      Bidding procedure mist be clearly and extensively outlined in the instructions to bidders because there are so many variations of the procedures.

    • B. 

      Bidding is nearly always necessary for public works or government projects.

    • C. 

      Open bidding usually presents more problem than other type.

    • D. 

      Competitive bidding takes more than negotiation but can result in a lower construction cost.

  • 3. 
    A performance bond is designed to:
    • A. 

      Ensure that the sub contractor complete the work.

    • B. 

      Guarantee that the contractor will finish on time.

    • C. 

      Cover any possible liens that may be filed on the building.

    • D. 

      Protect the owner by having a third party responsible for completing the work if the contractor does not.

  • 4. 
    If the lowest bid came in 20 percent over your client’s construction budget, what would be the best advice you could give your client?
    • A. 

      That you revise the design at no cost to reduce the construction cost.

    • B. 

      That the project be bid out again using another list of contractor.

    • C. 

      That you and the client work to revise the scope of the project to reduce cost.

    • D. 

      That all the deduct alternates be accepted to reduce the bid, and that the client authorize a slight increase in construction cost to bring the two together.

  • 5. 
    What variable affects the bid the most?
    • A. 

      Contractor’s profit margin

    • B. 

      Influence of the construction marketplace

    • C. 

      Labor and materials

    • D. 

      Sub contractor’s bid

  • 6. 
    In what order should the following activities take place during project closeout?                I. Preparation of the final certificate of payment    II. Punch list    III Issuance of the certificate of substantial completion     IV. notification by the contractor that the project is ready for final inspection     V. Receipt of the consent of surety.
    • A. 

      II, III, V, IV, then I

    • B. 

      II, IV, III, V, then I

    • C. 

      IV, II, V, I, then III

    • D. 

      IV, V, II, III, then I

  • 7. 
    Substantial completion indicates that:
    • A. 

      The owner can make use of the work for the intended purpose and the requirements of the contract documents have been fulfilled.

    • B. 

      The contractor has completed correcting punch list items.

    • C. 

      The final certificate for payment is issued by the Architect and all documentation has been delivered to the owner.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 8. 
    During the periodic visit to the site, the Architect notices what appears to be an undersized variable air volume box being installed.  What should the Architect do?
    • A. 

      Notify the mechanical engineer to look at the situation during the next site visit by the engineer. Note the observation on a field report.

    • B. 

      Find the contractor and stop work on the installation until the size of the unit can be verified by the mechanical engineer and compared against the contract documents.

    • C. 

      Notify the owner in writing that the work is not proceeding according to the contract documents. Arrange a meeting with the mechanical engineer to resolve the situation.

    • D. 

      Notify the contractor that the equipment may be undersized and have the contactor check on it. Ask the mechanical engineer to verify the size of the unit against the specifications and report to the Architect.

  • 9. 
    An Architect would use this instrument if the building department required additional exit signs beyond those shown on the approved plans when the project is 90 percent completed?
    • A. 

      Order for minor change

    • B. 

      Addendum

    • C. 

      Change order

    • D. 

      Construction change directive

  • 10. 
    The contractor is solely responsible for:                       I. field reports to the owner     II. field test     III. scaffolding     IV. reviewing claims of the sub contractor                     V. reviewing shop drawings
    • A. 

      . I, II, and III

    • B. 

      II and III

    • C. 

      II, III, and IV

    • D. 

      III and V

  • 11. 
    Which of the following is NOT true about submittals?
    • A. 

      The Architect must review them prior to checking by the contractor.

    • B. 

      The contractor id ultimately responsible for the accuracy of dimensions and quantities.

    • C. 

      They are not considered part of the contract documents.

    • D. 

      The contractor can reject them and request resubmission.

  • 12. 
    If a contractor makes a claim for additional money due to extra work caused by unforeseen circumstances, the Architect must respond within:
    • A. 

      5 days

    • B. 

      7 days

    • C. 

      10 days

    • D. 

      Not until supporting data are submitted.

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