How Much You Know About Brachial Plexus? Trivia Quiz

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How Much You Know About Brachial Plexus? Trivia Quiz - Quiz

How much do you know about brachial plexus? The brachial plexus is responsible for cutaneous and muscular innervation of the entire upper limb, and it is located in the neck extending into the axial posterior to the clavicle. This quiz is made to know about the complex functions and injuries related to Brachial Plexus. So, let's try out this quiz. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Nerves regenerate at ____ per month.

    • A.

      1 inch

    • B.

      1cm

    • C.

      5 cm

    Correct Answer
    B. 1cm
    Explanation
    Nerves regenerate at a rate of 1cm per month. This means that damaged or injured nerves have the ability to grow and repair themselves at a speed of 1cm per month.

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  • 2. 

    Trophic means

    • A.

      Skin changes

    • B.

      Change in limb size

    • C.

      Change in sensation

    Correct Answer
    A. Skin changes
    Explanation
    The term "trophic" refers to the nourishment or maintenance of tissues. In the context of the given options, "skin changes" is the most relevant choice as it directly relates to the nourishment and maintenance of the skin. Skin changes can occur due to various factors such as injury, infection, or underlying medical conditions. Therefore, trophic in this context signifies the changes in the skin's condition or appearance.

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  • 3. 

    Factors affecting regeneration are:

    • A.

      Nature of injury

    • B.

      Age of patient

    • C.

      Proximal versus distal

    • D.

      Diet

    • E.

      Mixed versus single

    Correct Answer
    A. Nature of injury
    Explanation
    The nature of injury refers to the type and severity of the damage or trauma that the patient has experienced. This factor can greatly influence the regeneration process. Different injuries may require different approaches and treatments for successful regeneration. For example, a minor cut may heal quickly and easily, while a deep wound or a fracture may require more time and specialized medical interventions. Understanding the nature of the injury is crucial in determining the appropriate course of action for promoting and facilitating regeneration.

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  • 4. 

    The movement goes from proximal to distal.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement "The movement goes from proximal to distal" is true. Proximal refers to a position closer to the center of the body or point of attachment, while distal refers to a position farther away from the center or point of attachment. In terms of movement, proximal to distal means that the movement starts from a point closer to the center and extends towards a point farther away. This is commonly observed in various anatomical movements, such as when the arm is raised from the side of the body to an overhead position.

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  • 5. 

    What is the first sensation to return after an injury?

    • A.

      Tingling

    • B.

      Pain

    • C.

      Sensitivity to temperature

    Correct Answer
    B. Pain
    Explanation
    After an injury, the first sensation to return is usually pain. Pain serves as a protective mechanism, alerting the body to potential damage or harm. It is the body's way of signaling that something is wrong and requires attention. While tingling and sensitivity to temperature may also occur after an injury, they typically follow the return of pain. Therefore, pain is the most immediate and common sensation to return after an injury.

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  • 6. 

    When performing retrograde massage, perform an active range of motion, above the heart and apply pressure garment afterwards.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement suggests that when performing retrograde massage, it is important to perform an active range of motion, specifically above the heart. This helps to improve blood circulation and promote lymphatic drainage. Additionally, applying a pressure garment afterwards can further enhance the effectiveness of the massage by providing compression and support to the area being treated. Therefore, the statement is true.

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  • 7. 

    The clinical signs of regeneration are: 

    • A.

      Skin color/texture more normal sensation returning

    • B.

      Sweating, discriminative sensation

    • C.

      Subluxation heals, increase ROM

    • D.

      Muscle tone, voluntary muscle function

    • E.

      Stereognosis returns

    Correct Answer
    A. Skin color/texture more normal sensation returning
    Explanation
    The clinical signs of regeneration include the improvement in skin color and texture, as well as the return of more normal sensation. This indicates that the damaged tissues are healing and the nerves are regenerating.

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  • 8. 

    Identify the injury: -Easy to injure (very superficial at the wrist, so easy to compress or lacerate) -Elbow is another compression site (antecubital area) since the nerve runs down the ventral surface of the UE -Think: loss of thumb abduction (there are other problems associated with damage to this nerve, but this can be used to cue your memory!) -Example: carpal tunnel syndrome -Tend not to use hand more from sensory loss than motor problem - high in the forearm causes the same sensory loss as one in the wrist -Motor losses will vary depending if the nerve is injured high or low in the forearm -high: paralysis of finger flexors, thenar muscles, and lumbricales II and III -low: most of the IPs will still flex, but thenar and lumbricales II and III will be paralyzed.

    • A.

      Axillary nerve

    • B.

      Median nerve

    • C.

      Ulnar nerve

    • D.

      Radial nerve

    • E.

      Musculocuntaneous

    Correct Answer
    B. Median nerve
    Explanation
    The given information suggests that the injury is likely to be to the median nerve. The median nerve is described as being easy to injure, especially at the wrist and elbow, where it can be compressed or lacerated. The loss of thumb abduction is mentioned as a cue for memory, which is a symptom associated with damage to the median nerve. Carpal tunnel syndrome is given as an example of an injury that affects the median nerve. The motor losses associated with median nerve injury are described as paralysis of finger flexors, thenar muscles, and lumbricales II and III, depending on whether the nerve is injured high or low in the forearm.

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  • 9. 

    Name the injury! -Think “wrist drop” -Located back of hand and arm (innervates extensor and supinator groups in forearm) -Twists around the humerus, therefore is prone to damage with humerus fractures -Sensory damage is not usually a functional problem (in dorsum of hand/arm) -Compression site: where radial nerve dips down into supinator muscle (“Saturday night palsy”) Treatment: splint Radial nerve splint (wrist 30 degrees extension, MP 0 degrees assist and thumb abduction)

    • A.

      Median nerve

    • B.

      Ulnar nerve

    • C.

      Radial nerve

    • D.

      Axillary nerve

    • E.

      Musculcutaneous

    Correct Answer
    C. Radial nerve
    Explanation
    The correct answer is radial nerve. The given information describes a condition known as "wrist drop" which is caused by damage to the radial nerve. The radial nerve innervates the extensor and supinator groups in the forearm and is prone to damage with humerus fractures. Sensory damage in the dorsum of the hand and arm is not usually a functional problem. The compression site of the radial nerve is where it dips down into the supinator muscle, which can result in a condition called "Saturday night palsy". Treatment for radial nerve injury includes splinting the wrist in 30 degrees extension, assisting MP joint at 0 degrees, and thumb abduction.

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  • 10. 

    Name the injury! Think “clawing”, (hyperextension of MPs of 4th and 5th fingers, atrophy of hypothenar, flattening or arches of hand); loss of thumb adduction -This nerve runs behind the olecranon (“funny bone”): key point of compression is the cubital tunnel (common problem in folks who rest arm, such as truck drivers) -Tinel’s sign: tingling or pain with light tapping over elbow -Treatment: splint (usually in safe position or MP extension blocking splint; ROM, strengthening

    • A.

      Median nerve

    • B.

      Ulnar nerve

    • C.

      Radial radial

    • D.

      Axillary

    • E.

      Musculocutaneous

    Correct Answer
    B. Ulnar nerve
    Explanation
    The given symptoms of "clawing" of the fingers, atrophy of the hypothenar muscles, and loss of thumb adduction are indicative of ulnar nerve injury. The ulnar nerve runs behind the olecranon (funny bone) and compression at the cubital tunnel is a common problem, especially in individuals who rest their arm, such as truck drivers. Tinel's sign, which is tingling or pain with light tapping over the elbow, is also associated with ulnar nerve injury. Treatment typically involves splinting, usually in a safe position or with MP extension blocking splint, as well as range of motion exercises and strengthening.

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  • 11. 

    In peripheral nerve injuries, pain becomes the primary disability, the two types are causalgia and neuroma.

    • A.

      True:

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True:
    Explanation
    In peripheral nerve injuries, pain can become the primary disability. This is because damage to the nerves can result in abnormal pain sensations, which can be debilitating for the individual. Causalgia and neuroma are two types of peripheral nerve injuries that are associated with chronic and severe pain. Causalgia refers to a persistent burning pain, while neuroma refers to the formation of a tangled mass of nerve fibers that can cause pain. Therefore, the statement that pain becomes the primary disability in peripheral nerve injuries and that causalgia and neuroma are two types of such injuries is true.

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  • 12. 

    Rarely damaged alone (usually in combination with b. plexus injury) -Weak paralysis of the deltoid, loss of muscle power to horizontally abduct; severe asymmetry of shoulders (due to atrophy of deltoid) -Treatment: ROM (don’t stretch) to prevent deformity, assistive devices, may surgically replace the muscle is damage is permanent.

    • A.

      Radial nerve injury

    • B.

      Ulnar nerve injury

    • C.

      Axillary nerve injury

    • D.

      Median nerve injury

    • E.

      Musculocutaneous

    Correct Answer
    C. Axillary nerve injury
    Explanation
    The correct answer is axillary nerve injury. This injury is rarely damaged alone and is usually seen in combination with brachial plexus injury. It results in weak paralysis of the deltoid muscle, causing a loss of muscle power to horizontally abduct the arm. This leads to severe asymmetry of the shoulders due to atrophy of the deltoid muscle. Treatment for this injury includes range of motion exercises to prevent deformity, the use of assistive devices, and surgical replacement of the muscle if the damage is permanent.

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  • 13. 

    Name that injury! High in the axilla/arm (eventually turns into another nerve distally); supplies all the muscles in the anterior (flexor) compartment of the arm -Injury is not actually common (usually due to trauma from a weapon of some sort, or other accident) -Weakness of elbow flexors/supinator

    • A.

      Ulnar nerve

    • B.

      Musculocutaneous nerve

    • C.

      Median nerve

    • D.

      Radial nerve

    • E.

      Axillary nerve

    Correct Answer
    B. Musculocutaneous nerve
    Explanation
    The musculocutaneous nerve is the correct answer because it is high in the axilla/arm and supplies all the muscles in the anterior (flexor) compartment of the arm. Although this injury is not common, weakness of elbow flexors/supinator can occur if the musculocutaneous nerve is damaged.

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  • 14. 

    Matching: neuropraxia: A. second and third-degree lesions Axonotmesis: B. Primary lesion Neurotmesis: C.severe third, fourth and fifth-degree lesions

    • A.

      1)A 2)B 3)C

    • B.

      1)B 2)A 3)C

    • C.

      1)C 2)B 3)A

    • D.

      1) A 2)C 3)B

    Correct Answer
    B. 1)B 2)A 3)C
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 1)B 2)A 3)C. This is because neuropraxia refers to a temporary loss of nerve function due to nerve compression or stretching, which corresponds to a primary lesion (B). Axonotmesis refers to a more severe nerve injury where the axon is damaged but the connective tissue remains intact, which corresponds to second and third-degree lesions (A). Neurotmesis refers to the most severe nerve injury where both the axon and connective tissue are damaged, which corresponds to severe third, fourth, and fifth-degree lesions (C).

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  • 15. 

    Classification of lesions: Ionic (electrolyte imbalance: vascular: anoxia at capillary level mechanical: structural changes

    • A.

      Secondary degree lesion

    • B.

      Primary lesion

    • C.

      Third degree lesion

    • D.

      Fifth degree lesion

    Correct Answer
    B. Primary lesion
    Explanation
    The given answer, "primary lesion," is the correct answer because it refers to the initial or earliest stage of a lesion. A primary lesion is the first appearance of a pathological change or abnormality in an organ or tissue. It is the starting point from which further progression or development of the lesion occurs. In contrast, secondary, third degree, and fifth degree lesions refer to subsequent stages or more advanced forms of the lesion.

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  • 16. 

    Axon fibre damage at sight good prognosis Schwann tubes damaged w/in intact nerve trunk good prognosis

    • A.

      Second and third degree lesions

    • B.

      Primary lesions

    • C.

      Fifth degree lesions

    • D.

      Fourth degree

    • E.

      Severe third degree

    Correct Answer
    A. Second and third degree lesions
    Explanation
    Second and third degree lesions refer to different levels of damage to the axon fibers within a nerve trunk. These types of lesions indicate that the axon fibers have been damaged to varying degrees, but the Schwann tubes surrounding the nerve trunk remain intact. This is considered a good prognosis because the Schwann tubes can provide a supportive environment for nerve regeneration. In contrast, fourth and fifth degree lesions indicate more severe damage, where both the axon fibers and the Schwann tubes are damaged. Severe third degree lesions suggest extensive damage to the axon fibers, but the Schwann tubes are still intact, indicating a better prognosis compared to fourth and fifth degree lesions.

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  • 17. 

    Extensive and/or complete fibrosis of nerve segment causing the nerve to be nonfunctioning and nonconductive excision of neuroma and repair is indicated prognosis is poor if the condition is clinically and electrically complete for 10-15 months grafting may be necessary

    • A.

      Primary lesion

    • B.

      Secondary lesion

    • C.

      Severe third lesion

    • D.

      Fourth degree lesion

    • E.

      Fifth degree lesion

    Correct Answer
    D. Fourth degree lesion
    Explanation
    The given correct answer, "fourth degree lesion," suggests that the extensive and complete fibrosis of the nerve segment has caused the nerve to be nonfunctioning and nonconductive. This level of damage indicates a severe condition where excision of the neuroma and repair is required. The prognosis is poor if the condition has been clinically and electrically complete for 10-15 months, and grafting may be necessary. Therefore, the term "fourth degree lesion" accurately describes the extent and severity of the nerve damage in this scenario.

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  • 18. 

    Nerve is severed and two ends retract

    • A.

      Fifth degree lesion

    • B.

      Fourth degree lesion

    • C.

      Third degree lesion

    • D.

      Second degree lesion

    Correct Answer
    A. Fifth degree lesion
    Explanation
    A fifth degree lesion refers to the most severe type of nerve injury, where the nerve is completely severed and both ends retract away from each other. This means that there is a complete disruption in the continuity of the nerve, making it extremely difficult for the nerve to regenerate and restore normal function. In contrast, a fourth degree lesion involves severe damage to the nerve but without complete separation, while third and second degree lesions indicate less severe injuries.

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