Block 14 Viral Gastroentiritis

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 327

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Block 14 Viral Gastroentiritis

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The mother of a 6-month-old child presents with her child at the emergency department in March. Earlier in the evening, the child suddenly started vomiting and has done so several times since and now presents with watery diarrhea. What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this child’s illness?
    • A. 

      Astrovirus

    • B. 

      Calicivirus

    • C. 

      Adenovirus

    • D. 

      Torovirus

    • E. 

      Rotavirus

  • 2. 
    The mother of a 6-month-old child presents with her child at the emergency department in March. Earlier in the evening, the child suddenly started vomiting and has done so several times since and now presents with watery diarrhea. What is the most likely source of the child’s infection?
    • A. 

      Aerosols from an infected, asymptomatic sibling

    • B. 

      Breast milk

    • C. 

      Water

    • D. 

      Direct contact with an infected, asymptomatic sibling

    • E. 

      Blenderised shellfish

  • 3. 
    A 39-year-old male presents to an outpatient clinic complaining of abdominal cramps and sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea. What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this man’s illness?
    • A. 

      Giardia lamblia

    • B. 

      Norovirus

    • C. 

      E. coli O157:H7

    • D. 

      Dinophysis sp.

    • E. 

      Rotavirus

  • 4. 
    Which statement is false?
    • A. 

      Rotavirus infections usually occur as outbreaks

    • B. 

      Rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of deaths due to diarrhea.

    • C. 

      Rotavirus infections are observed primarily in children under the age of two

    • D. 

      There are vaccines against rotaviruses.

    • E. 

      IgA antibodies afford the best protection against rotaviruses

  • 5. 
    What are the characteristics of the Caliciviridae?
    • A. 

      Naked, (-) ssRNA

    • B. 

      Naked, (+) ssRNA

    • C. 

      Naked, dsRNA

    • D. 

      Naked, dsDNA

    • E. 

      Naked, ssDNA

  • 6. 
    What are the characteristics of the Reoviridae?
    • A. 

      Naked, (-) ssRNA

    • B. 

      Naked, (+) ssRNA

    • C. 

      Naked, dsRNA

    • D. 

      Naked, dsDNA

    • E. 

      Naked, ssDNA

  • 7. 
    A 75-year-old male nursing home resident complains of abdominal cramps, sudden onset of vomiting and watery diarrhea. A stool sample sent for analysis appears watery with no mucous and is negative for blood, leukocytes or parasites. Stool culture is negative for bacteria. He is the third case within the nursing home residents and one healthcare worker also presented with the same symptoms. This episode seems to be restricted to this population. What virus(es) is(are) most likely to be responsible for this outbreak? CHECK ALL THAT APPLY
    • A. 

      Astrovirus

    • B. 

      Calicivirus

    • C. 

      Adenovirus

    • D. 

      Torovirus

    • E. 

      Rotavirus

  • 8. 
    What is the best indicator for a norovirus outbreak?
    • A. 

      Children and adults affected

    • B. 

      Only adults affected

    • C. 

      Only children affected

    • D. 

      Confined to restricted geographical location (camp, compound, school, hospital, ship)

  • 9. 
    A 20-month-old girl is brought by her mother to the emergency department following the sudden onset of vomiting and watery diarrhea (no mucus, no blood). The child has a fever and her vital signs are: HR 130/min, RR 36/min and BP 100/60 mmHg. A stool sample sent for analysis is negative for leukocytes, bacteria, cysts or ova. Which of the following is the enterotoxin involved in this child’s illness?
    • A. 

      Neuraminidase

    • B. 

      Shiga toxin

    • C. 

      NSP4

    • D. 

      CPE

    • E. 

      NS1

  • 10. 
    A 20-month-old girl is brought by her mother to the emergency department following the sudden onset of vomiting and watery diarrhea (no mucus, no blood). The child has a fever and her vital signs are: HR 130/min, RR 36/min and BP 100/60 mmHg. A stool sample sent for analysis is negative for leukocytes, bacteria, cysts or ova. What best describes the most likely virus responsible for this child’s illness?
    • A. 

      Naked, (+) ssRNA

    • B. 

      Naked, (-) ssRNA

    • C. 

      Naked, ssDNA

    • D. 

      Naked, dsRNA

    • E. 

      Naked, dsDNA

  • 11. 
    A 10-year-old boy presents with his mother to an outpatient clinic in March following an abrupt onset of vomiting and diarrhea. The child has a low-grade fever and his vital signs are: HR 120/min, RR 28/min and BP 110/70 mmHg. A stool sample sent for analysis and culture yields the following results:  Watery with no mucus    Negative for blood    Negative for leukocytes    Negative for parasites    Negative for pathogenic bacteria    Negative for rotavirus antigen    Negative for norovirus antigen    Positive for a naked, (+) ssRNA virus What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this child’s gastroenteritis?
    • A. 

      Astrovirus

    • B. 

      Coronavirus

    • C. 

      Adenovirus

    • D. 

      Norovirus

    • E. 

      Rotavirus

  • 12. 
    A 2-year-old boy presents with his mother to an outpatient clinic in July following an abrupt onset of several episodes of diarrhea. The mother reports that the child ‘seems colicky and that his stools are very liquid with mucus in them’. On physical examination, the child has a low-grade fever, but all other findings are unremarkable. A stool sample sent for analysis and culture yields the following results:    What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this child’s gastroenteritis? Watery with mucus    Negative for blood    Negative for leukocytes    Negative for parasites   Negative for pathogenic bacteria    Negative for rotavirus antigen    Negative for norovirus antigen   Positive for a naked, dsDNA virus
    • A. 

      Rotavirus

    • B. 

      Norovirus

    • C. 

      Adenovirus

    • D. 

      Coronavirus

    • E. 

      Astrovirus

  • 13. 
    A 7-year-old girl presents with her mother to an outpatient clinic in February following an abrupt onset of vomiting and diarrhea. On physical examination, the child has a low-grade fever and complains of abdominal pain; all other findings are unremarkable. A stool sample sent for analysis and culture yields the following results: Watery with no mucus    Negative for blood    Negative for leukocytes    Negative for parasites    Negative for pathogenic bacteria   Negative for rotavirus antigen    Negative for norovirus antigen    Positive for a naked, (+) ssRNA virus What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this child’s gastroenteritis?
    • A. 

      Coronavirus

    • B. 

      Adenovirus

    • C. 

      Astrovirus

    • D. 

      Reovirus

    • E. 

      Calicivirus

  • 14. 
    During a food safety conference held on a cruise ship, 164 attendees and crew members are struck with a sudden onset of vomiting (average of 5 times/day), abdominal cramps, and watery diarrhea (average of 8 times/day) within a 48-hour period. At the next scheduled stop, water, food, and stool samples are sent for analysis by local health authorities. Results for the stool samples are as follows: Watery with no mucus Negative for blood Negative for leukocytes Negative for parasites Negative for viral enterotoxins Negative for bacterial enterotoxins   What is the most likely etiologic agent responsible for this outbreak?
    • A. 

      Coronavirus

    • B. 

      Adenovirus

    • C. 

      Astrovirus

    • D. 

      Reovirus

    • E. 

      Calicivirus

  • 15. 
    What is the most likely source of ABOVE outbreak (question No. 14)?
    • A. 

      Whipped cream

    • B. 

      Undercooked hamburger meat

    • C. 

      Devilled eggs

    • D. 

      Garden salad

    • E. 

      Undercooked chicken

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