AP Government ChAPters 9 & 10

61 Questions | Total Attempts: 971

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AP Government Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Anthony King's concept of "running scared" suggests that politicians
    • A. 

      Do too little campaigning because they are constantly governing.

    • B. 

      Do too little governing because they are perpetually campaigning.

    • C. 

      Work constantly to avoid media coverage.

    • D. 

      Make every effort to avoid public opinion.

    • E. 

      Both C and D

  • 2. 
    The Federal Election Commission
    • A. 

      Is a bipartisan body responsible for administering campaign finance laws and enforcing compliance with those laws.

    • B. 

      Is the Republican Party's watchdog organization, which monitors fundraising and spending by Democratic candidates.

    • C. 

      Tabulates and certifies the votes in all federal elections.

    • D. 

      Administers all elections in the United States from school board to president with a staff of 160,000.

    • E. 

      Is a nonpartisan political organization that has sought for over fifty years to reform campaign financing.

  • 3. 
    Which of the following functions do elections LEAST serve?
    • A. 

      Providing legitimacy to the political system

    • B. 

      Selecting public officials

    • C. 

      Connecting citizens to government officials

    • D. 

      Making and coordinating public policy

    • E. 

      Providing legitimacy to the political system

  • 4. 
    Which of the following functions do elections LEAST serve?
    • A. 

      Providing legitimacy to the political system

    • B. 

      Selecting public officials

    • C. 

      Connecting citizens to government officials

    • D. 

      Making and coordinating public policy

    • E. 

      Providing legitimacy to the political system

  • 5. 
    Daniel Smith argues that initiatives typically stem from
    • A. 

      Responsive elected officials, working in a coalition.

    • B. 

      Broad public demand for the policy.

    • C. 

      The actions of a dedicated policy entrepreneur.

    • D. 

      The natural emergence of policy issues.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 6. 
    Of the following, which is the most direct form of democracy?
    • A. 

      Presidential election

    • B. 

      Referendum

    • C. 

      Recall

    • D. 

      Initiative

    • E. 

      Direct primary

  • 7. 
    The election of 1800 was
    • A. 

      Decided by the House of Representatives.

    • B. 

      Decided by the full Congress.

    • C. 

      Decided by the Electoral College.

    • D. 

      Decided by the direct vote of the people.

    • E. 

      Overturned by the Supreme Court.

  • 8. 
    What was the focus of the election of 1896?
    • A. 

      Slavery

    • B. 

      World War I

    • C. 

      The Great Depression

    • D. 

      Economics

    • E. 

      The religious beliefs of Jefferson

  • 9. 
    Aside from overturning the Florida Supreme Court, what did the Supreme Court rule in Bush v. Gore (2000)?
    • A. 

      That more precise and consistent standards for evaluating ballots would have to be applied in all counties for ballot recounts to be valid.

    • B. 

      That a state recount would always be required when an outcome was in question.

    • C. 

      That Florida must streamline all of its voting procedures by 2004.

    • D. 

      That the goal of more consistent and precise voting standards was realistic on the state level but not necessarily on the national level.

    • E. 

      That all ballots and election materials must be exactly the same across the country.

  • 10. 
    Which of the following is TRUE about American elections over the past 100 years?
    • A. 

      The suffrage has narrowed, and the turnout has increased.

    • B. 

      Suffrage has broadened, but there has been no change in turnout.

    • C. 

      The suffrage has broadened, and the turnout has decreased.

    • D. 

      The suffrage has narrowed, and the turnout has decreased.

    • E. 

      The suffrage has broadened, and the turnout has increased.

  • 11. 
    Which of the following statements about voting is FALSE?
    • A. 

      It might be rational to spend time becoming informed, deciding who to vote for, and turning out on Election Day.

    • B. 

      In many cases, your vote will not make a difference to the outcome of the election.

    • C. 

      The costs of voting frequently outweigh the benefits of voting.

    • D. 

      If there is little difference in the policy positions of the candidates, it is not rational to vote.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 12. 
    What new way to register to vote was implemented with the passage of the Motor Voter Act?
    • A. 

      In an approved drive-through motor vehicle' bureau.

    • B. 

      By filling out a form that is driven to your house.

    • C. 

      After you take driver's education classes.

    • D. 

      By checking a box on your license application or renewal form.

    • E. 

      When you buy or lease a car, by checking off a voter registration form.

  • 13. 
    Political efficacy refers to the belief that
    • A. 

      The costs of voting outweigh the benefits.

    • B. 

      One should always support democratic government.

    • C. 

      Significant policy differences exist between parties.

    • D. 

      Government is very inefficient and needs to be streamlined.

    • E. 

      Ordinary people can influence the government.

  • 14. 
    Which of the following countries has the lowest voter turnout rate?
    • A. 

      Australia

    • B. 

      France

    • C. 

      United States

    • D. 

      Bulgaria

    • E. 

      Italy

  • 15. 
    Which of the following characteristics would make one more likely to vote in an election?
    • A. 

      Having a low income

    • B. 

      Being a college student

    • C. 

      Being a welfare recipient

    • D. 

      Having a college degree

    • E. 

      Being a young adult

  • 16. 
    The mandate theory of elections is the idea that
    • A. 

      A candidate must get at least 75 percent of the vote to win.

    • B. 

      A candidate must get at least sixty percent of the vote to win.

    • C. 

      The election winner has authorization from voters to carry out his or her promised policies.

    • D. 

      In order to improve turnout rates in the United States, voting must be made a legal requirement of all citizens, with failure to vote resulting in a small fine.

    • E. 

      A candidate must get a majority of the votes cast (fifty percent plus one) in order to take office.

  • 17. 
    Which of these is the least important dimension of a candidate's image?
    • A. 

      Integrity

    • B. 

      Intelligence

    • C. 

      Reliability

    • D. 

      Competence

    • E. 

      Experience

  • 18. 
    Research on voting behavior has shown that
    • A. 

      Policy voting has become harder than in the past.

    • B. 

      A candidate's image is not as important today as it was in the past.

    • C. 

      Americans tend to identify with the underdog.

    • D. 

      Party identification has become more important in voting decisions.

    • E. 

      Policy voting has become somewhat easier than in the past.

  • 19. 
    Studies have shown that during the 1960s and 1970s,
    • A. 

      Large numbers of people who had been eligible to vote but never voted surged into the electorate.

    • B. 

      Voting according to political party identification increased.

    • C. 

      Political party identification no longer affected voting behavior.

    • D. 

      The hold of the parties on voters eroded substantially.

    • E. 

      Democrats voted along party lines more than Republicans.

  • 20. 
    The "electors" in the Electoral College are
    • A. 

      Selected by state parties, usually as a reward for faithful service to the party over the years.

    • B. 

      The members of the House from each state, who vote strictly according to who won the majority of their district's votes.

    • C. 

      The members of Congress from each state, who vote strictly according to who won the majority of their state's votes.

    • D. 

      Selected by state legislatures well in advance of the presidential election, and each elector votes his or her own conscience as to who would be the best president.

    • E. 

      A bipartisan group of political scientists, public officials, jurists, and other respected individuals chosen by the governor of each state.

  • 21. 
    Retrospective voting refers to voting for
    • A. 

      Different parties and candidates election after election.

    • B. 

      A candidate who promises to continue policies that have made you feel better off.

    • C. 

      A candidate because of his or her past stands on the issues.

    • D. 

      The same party and candidates election after election.

    • E. 

      Candidates for nostalgic reasons because they promise to return the country to some golden age in its past.

  • 22. 
    While the threat of electoral punishment constrains policymakers, it also helps to increase generalized support for
    • A. 

      Incumbents who have done a good job.

    • B. 

      Individualistic, rather than, collective policy solutions.

    • C. 

      The private sector.

    • D. 

      Government and its powers.

    • E. 

      Unelected government officials in the bureaucracy.

  • 23. 
    Individuals who believe that they can influence government are also more likely to believe
    • A. 

      That elections should be held more often.

    • B. 

      That government should have more power.

    • C. 

      That the courts should be a much smaller part of the governmental system.

    • D. 

      That government should be cut back.

    • E. 

      That the president should have more power.

  • 24. 
    In the 1976 case of Buckley v. Valeo, the Supreme Court ruled that
    • A. 

      The limitation on the amount of money people could contribute to their own election campaigns was not a violation of free speech, and was constitutional.

    • B. 

      Congressional and state legislative districts must be of equal population and reapportioned every ten years.

    • C. 

      The limitation on the amount of money persons could contribute to their own election campaigns violated free speech, and was unconstitutional.

    • D. 

      Presidential election campaigns could not be paid for by tax dollars.

    • E. 

      The forced disclosure of contributions to federal elections violated freedom of association, and was therefore unconstitutional.

  • 25. 
    What does a presidential candidate have to do to qualify for federal matching funds?
    • A. 

      Raise $5,000 on their own in at least 20 states.

    • B. 

      Win the nomination.

    • C. 

      Win three primaries.

    • D. 

      Get 100,000 signatures in their support in at least five states.

    • E. 

      Raise $50,000 on their own in all states collectively.

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