Academic Advising Nbr. 01 - Foundations

9 Questions | Total Attempts: 27

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Academic Advising Quizzes & Trivia

Academic Advising in higher education today is a complex process requiring knowledge about the informational, relational, and conceptual components of advising. Advisors use specialized knowledge and skills to help their students achieve their educational goals while encouraging their behavioral and intellectual development. --- This quiz covers the history of academic advising, NACADA's statement of core-values, and organizational models used in delivering academic advising.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The history of Academic Advising in the United States can be divided into three time periods. The FIRST time period can be described as "Before Academic Advising was Defined." This time period began...
    • A. 

      In 387 B.C. when Plato founded the Academy of Athens.

    • B. 

      In 1636 when Harvard College was founded.

    • C. 

      In 1693 when the College of William and Mary was founded.

    • D. 

      Immediately after World War I.

    • E. 

      In 1972 when Crookston published his article describing advising as teaching.

  • 2. 
    The history of Academic Advising in the United States can be divided into three time periods. The SECOND time period can be described as "Academic Advising as a Defined and Unexamined Activity." This time period began...
    • A. 

      Immediately after World War I in high schools around the country.

    • B. 

      April 1, 1910, in Manhattan, Kansas in a corner booth in a deli on the corner of State and Main at 1:15pm.

    • C. 

      In 1889 when Johns Hopkins started a system of academic advising, through the late 1930s when almost all institutions had formalized advising programs.

    • D. 

      In 1972 when Crookston published his article describing advising as teaching.

    • E. 

      In 1979 when the National Academic Advising Association was formed.

  • 3. 
    The NACADA Statement of Core Values explicitly state that academic advisors are responsible...
    • A. 

      For teaching students to become members of their higher education community, to think critically about their roles and responsibilities as students, and to prepare to be educated citizens of a democratic society and global community.

    • B. 

      For understanding the curriculum, pedagogy, and set of student learning outcomes that are the result of academic advising.

    • C. 

      To the individuals they advise, for referring students when necessary, to their colleges, to their departments, and to NACADA.

    • D. 

      To the individuals they advise, for involving others when appropriate, to their institutions, to higher education, to their educational community, and for their professional practice and for themselves personally.

    • E. 

      For synthesizing and conceptualizing students' educational experiences within the frameworks of their aspirations, abilities and lives to extend learning beyond campus boundaries and timeframes.

  • 4. 
    According to the summary of the NACADA Concept of Academic Advising, academic advising is based...
    • A. 

      In Manhattan, Kansas.

    • B. 

      In a solid foundation of student development theory.

    • C. 

      In engaging students beyond their own world views, while acknowledging their individual characteristics, values, and motivations as they enter, move through, and exit the institution.

    • D. 

      In the teaching and learning mission of higher education, and is a series of intentional interactions with a curriculum, a pedagogy, and a set of student learning outcomes.

    • E. 

      In the theories found in the fields of social sciences, humanities, and education.

  • 5. 
    The three types of institutional organizational models of Academic Advising are...
    • A. 

      Based upon theories of Chickering, O'Banion, and Crookston.

    • B. 

      Faculty Advisors, Professional Advisors, and Peer Advisors.

    • C. 

      Synergistic advising protocols, Persevering homogeneous matrices of Advising heuristics, and Ergonomic advising hubs.

    • D. 

      Decentralized, Centralized, and Shared.

    • E. 

      Based on William Perry's general positions of Intellectual and Ethical Development: Dualism, Multiplicity, Relativism, and Commitment.

  • 6. 
    Organizational Models for Academic Advising. The two types of Decentralized Models are...
    • A. 

      Faculty-Only and Satellite.

    • B. 

      Faculty-Only and the Split Model.

    • C. 

      Self Contained and the Dual Model.

    • D. 

      Satellite and Supplementary Model.

    • E. 

      A Team-oriented multi-directional advising protocol and the progressive total diversity model.

  • 7. 
    Organizational Models for Academic Advising. The one type of Centralized Model is called...
    • A. 

      The Centralized Model.

    • B. 

      The Total Intake Model.

    • C. 

      The Supplementary Model.

    • D. 

      The Self-Contained Model.

    • E. 

      The Primary Model.

  • 8. 
    Organizational Models for Academic Advising. The four types of Shared Models are...
    • A. 

      The Faculty-Only Model, the Satellite Model, the Self-Contained Model, and the Dual-Model.

    • B. 

      The Shared Model, the Split Model, the Supplementary Model, and the Self-Contained Model.

    • C. 

      The Supplementary Model, the Split Model, The Dual Model, and the Stand-alone Model.

    • D. 

      The Daily Model, the Weekly Model, the Monthly Model, and the Yearly Model.

    • E. 

      The Supplementary Model, the Split Model, the Dual Model, and the Total Intake Model.

  • 9. 
    There is no one best organizational model. But which variables should be considered when choosing an organizational model for advising? (Choose all that apply)
    • A. 

      The philosophy and goals of advising of the institution.

    • B. 

      The scope and structure of the current advising program.

    • C. 

      The budget, the political climate of the administration, the support for advising by the Board of Regents, and the governor’s educational background.

    • D. 

      The Institutional, Student, and Faculty characteristics.

    • E. 

      The degree of fit between the model and the Institutional culture.