Quiz On Approaches To Bible Study

26 Questions

Settings
Please wait...
Bible Quizzes & Trivia

This quiz is about approaches to bible study. It is a guide for students to better understand the bible.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    How should we approach the Bible so that we may better understand its meaning for us? We need to have a methodology where “the word of God may become more and more the spiritual nourishment of the members of the people of God, the source for them of a life of faith_______, hope.
    • A. 

      Love

  • 2. 
    There are different approaches to the Bible because of personal interests. They could have identified from the extreme right to the extreme left.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 3. 
    __________ - It starts from the principle that the Bible, being the word of God, inspired and free from error, should be read and interpreted literally in all its details.
    • A. 

      Fundamentalism

  • 4. 
    __________ - This approach considers the Bible as a collection of fairy tales. It has little or no significance for educated people. There is simply no faith.
    • A. 

      Mythological

  • 5. 
    ________ - is particularly attentive to the historical development of the texts and the traditions across the passage of time.
    • A. 

      Diachronic approach

  • 6. 
    __________ - pays attention to the final form of the text as it appears to us today, without any particular interest for what would literally stand “behind” the texts.
    • A. 

      Synchronic Approach

  • 7. 
    Exegesis (Greek word “__________” meaning “to draw out”)
    • A. 

      Exegeisthai

  • 8. 
    __________ - (Greek word “hermeneuein” meaning “to explain” ) is the theory of reading, interpreting and understanding of a text whether written or serving as document of life.
    • A. 

      Hermeneutics

  • 9. 
    Applied to the Biblical text, hermeneutics covers the entire process of biblical interpretation. Traditionally, interpretation takes three forms: speaking, __________ and explaining.
    • A. 

      Translating

  • 10. 
    The German philosopher Gadamer explains the interpretative process in terms of the interplay of the world behind the text, the world of the text, and the world before the text. 1. The world behind the text (the world of the__________) views the text as a window, a source of information about the author, the addresses and the world in which they lived and everything the gave rise to the text.
    • A. 

      author

  • 11. 
    3. The world before the text (the __________) concerns the world of meaning that the text generates.
    • A. 

      Reader

  • 12. 
    Exegesis is a method or process of drawing out the meaning of a given text, i.e., the original intention of the writer, and the meaning the passage would have held for the readers it was first intended.
    • A. 

      TRUE

    • B. 

      FALSE

  • 13. 
    It deals primarily with the manuscripts and is task to ascertain the original text or the variant reading that is closest to the original form and the different variations presented by the manuscript.
    • A. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • B. 

      Historical Criticism

    • C. 

      Textual Criticism

    • D. 

      Source Criticism

    • E. 

      Form Criticism

  • 14. 
    It involves the reading of the text in the light of oppressive structures of patriarchal society. It is used to facilitate a better understanding of what is to be interpreted and to arrive at a unity of truth.
    • A. 

      Literary Criticism

    • B. 

      Feminist

    • C. 

      Historical Criticism

    • D. 

      Form Criticism

    • E. 

      Source Criticism

  • 15. 
    • A. 

      Form Criticism

    • B. 

      Literary Criticism

    • C. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • D. 

      Feminist Criticism

    • E. 

      Historical Criticism

  • 16. 
    It views biblical narratives as literary texts, which can be subjected to literary analysis, both ancient and modern. It communicates the biblical message in the form of story and personal testimony, which can reshape or influence the world of the reader.
    • A. 

      Narrative Criticism

    • B. 

      Textual Criticism

    • C. 

      Source Criticism

    • D. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • E. 

      Historical Criticism

  • 17. 
    It studies how the text is edited and how it develops according to the final editor’s point of view. By doing this, we get to know the nature and extent of an editor’s own contribution to the work that has come from his hands and to uncover the theological tendencies and the compositional habits of the writers. It makes us understand more accurately the intention of the authors and editors of the Bible, as well as the message, which they addressed to their first readers.
    • A. 

      Narrative Criticism

    • B. 

      Historical Criticism

    • C. 

      Feminist Criticism

    • D. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • E. 

      Source Criticism

  • 18. 
    It attempts to establish the sources, which a given biblical writer may have used in compiling his work in order to resolve existing discrepancies and inconsistencies. It also explains the origin and interrelationship of the Synoptic Gospels (Mt, Mk, and Lk.). Reading these three gospels makes us discover agreements and disagreements with them. Thus, scholars had recourse to the “two-source” hypothesis. Accordingly, the gospels of Matthew and Luke were composed out of two principal sources. The first source is the Gospel of Mark, however, there are several areas common to the two which cannot be found in Mark. Thus, it is theorized that they have used another source. This is called later on as the “Q” source (German “Quelle”). The task is therefore restricted to dissecting and dismantling the text in order to identify the various sources
    • A. 

      Source Criticism

    • B. 

      Form Criticism

    • C. 

      Narrative Criticism

    • D. 

      Textual Criticism

    • E. 

      Redaction Criticism

  • 19. 
    It determines the different literary types or a form used in the text and identifies their respective life situation.
    • A. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • B. 

      Historical Criticism

    • C. 

      Literary Criticism

    • D. 

      Form Criticism

    • E. 

      Source Criticism

  • 20. 
    __________ – aging between the 2nd to the 17th centuries.
    • A. 

      Greek manuscripts

  • 21. 
    __________ - (liturgical books) – 2,500 are in Greek and thousands in other languages.
    • A. 

      Lectionaries

  • 22. 
    It examines the vocabulary and grammatical style of the text. It compares the use of a word in a passage and sees how the same word is used in other books of the Bible and other writings of the same period. It is concerned with the style, structure and distinctive language of a given text.
    • A. 

      Redaction Criticism

    • B. 

      Historical Criticism

    • C. 

      Textual Criticism

    • D. 

      Feminist Criticism

    • E. 

      Literary Criticism

  • 23. 
    Life situation - __________
    • A. 

      Sitz-im-leben

  • 24. 
    __________ - conclude that the Gospels were written: a. To meet the liturgical needs. b. To settle polemical issues. c. To provide information about Jesus. d. To instruct new converts in Christian living. e. To evangelize others.
    • A. 

      Theorists

  • 25. 
    Role of Textual Criticism: To decide from a mass of conflicting readings which variants deserve to be included in the __________.
    • A. 

      Text

  • 26. 
    Thus, by determining the literary form, we can also determine the kind of __________ that is expressed by the text.
    • A. 

      Truth