Are You Familiar With Central Venous Access Device?

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| By Zlatan Aleksic
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Zlatan Aleksic
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 193 | Total Attempts: 1,041,828
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Are You Familiar With Central Venous Access Device? - Quiz

Central venous access devices are very small tubes that are used for administering fluids and medications. Are you familiar with medical terms regarding this topic? Take this quiz to find out for sure! Good luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Where can't Central venous access device be placed in?

    • A.

      Perforator veins

    • B.

      Internal jugular vein

    • C.

      Axillary vein

    • D.

      Femoral vein

    Correct Answer
    A. Perforator veins
    Explanation
    Central venous access devices, such as central venous catheters, are typically placed in large veins to allow for the administration of fluids, medications, and blood products. Perforator veins are small veins that connect the superficial veins to the deep veins. They are not suitable for the placement of central venous access devices as they are not large enough to accommodate the catheter. Therefore, central venous access devices cannot be placed in perforator veins.

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  • 2. 

    Which one is the reason for Central venous access device usage?

    • A.

      Chemotherapy

    • B.

      Long-term pain medications

    • C.

      Peripheral blood stem cell collections

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    Central venous access devices (CVADs) are used for various medical procedures and treatments. Chemotherapy, which involves the administration of strong medications to treat cancer, often requires a CVAD as it allows for the safe and efficient delivery of these drugs. Similarly, long-term pain medications may also be administered through a CVAD to ensure continuous and controlled pain relief. Additionally, CVADs are used for peripheral blood stem cell collections, which involves the collection of stem cells from the bloodstream for transplantation. Therefore, all of the given options are valid reasons for the usage of a central venous access device.

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  • 3. 

    Which of the following is not a type of the Central venous access device?

    • A.

      Implanted port

    • B.

      Tunneled catheters

    • C.

      Indwelling catheters

    • D.

      Non-tunneled catheters

    Correct Answer
    C. Indwelling catheters
    Explanation
    Indwelling catheters are actually a type of Central venous access device. Implanted ports, tunneled catheters, and non-tunneled catheters are all examples of Central venous access devices.

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  • 4. 

    How is it called a catheter with two lumens?

    • A.

      Duolumen

    • B.

      Muliluminal

    • C.

      Bilumen

    • D.

      Biluminal

    Correct Answer
    D. Biluminal
    Explanation
    A catheter with two lumens is called "biluminal" because the prefix "bi-" means two, and "lumen" refers to a channel or opening within the catheter. Therefore, "biluminal" accurately describes a catheter that has two separate lumens or channels.

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  • 5. 

    Which of the following is the non-tunneled central venous access device?

    • A.

      Quinton catheter

    • B.

      Hickman catheter

    • C.

      Small bore catheter

    • D.

      Broviacs catheter

    Correct Answer
    A. Quinton catheter
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Quinton catheter. A Quinton catheter is a type of non-tunneled central venous access device. It is a single-lumen catheter that is inserted directly into a large vein, usually the subclavian or jugular vein, and is used for short-term access. Unlike tunneled catheters like Hickman and Broviacs catheters, a Quinton catheter does not have a subcutaneous tunnel and is not intended for long-term use. Small bore catheters, on the other hand, refer to a different type of catheter with a smaller diameter.

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  • 6. 

    Which central venous access device is entirely under the skin?

    • A.

      PICC line

    • B.

      Implanted port

    • C.

      Tunneled catheters

    • D.

      Non-tunneled

    Correct Answer
    B. Implanted port
    Explanation
    An implanted port is a central venous access device that is entirely under the skin. It consists of a small reservoir that is surgically implanted beneath the skin, usually in the chest or arm. The port is connected to a catheter that is inserted into a large vein, allowing for the administration of medications, fluids, or blood products directly into the bloodstream. The port is accessed using a special needle, which is inserted through the skin and into the reservoir. This type of device is often used for long-term or frequent administration of medications or chemotherapy.

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  • 7. 

    Which technique is most often used for insertation of the line?

    • A.

      Lithotomy

    • B.

      Intubation

    • C.

      Seldinger technique

    • D.

      Acupuncture

    Correct Answer
    C. Seldinger technique
    Explanation
    The Seldinger technique is most often used for the insertion of a line. This technique involves the use of a needle to puncture a blood vessel, followed by the insertion of a guidewire through the needle. The needle is then removed, leaving the guidewire in place. The line is then threaded over the guidewire and into the blood vessel. This technique is commonly used for procedures such as central venous catheterization and arterial line insertion.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following complications is connected with the central venous access devices?

    • A.

      Pneumothorax

    • B.

      Bloodstream infections

    • C.

      Thrombosis

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    Central venous access devices are commonly used in medical settings to administer medications, fluids, or nutrients directly into the central veins. However, these devices can lead to various complications. Pneumothorax, a condition where air accumulates in the space between the lungs and chest wall, can occur during the insertion of the device. Bloodstream infections are another potential complication, as the device provides a direct pathway for bacteria to enter the bloodstream. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clots, can also occur due to the presence of the device. Therefore, all of the mentioned complications are connected with central venous access devices.

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  • 9. 

    How often should the gauze dressing be changed?

    • A.

      Every 2 days

    • B.

      Every 3 days

    • C.

      Every 4 days

    • D.

      Every day

    Correct Answer
    A. Every 2 days
    Explanation
    The gauze dressing should be changed every 2 days to ensure proper wound care and prevent infection. Changing the dressing too frequently can disrupt the healing process, while changing it less frequently can increase the risk of infection. Every 2 days strikes a balance between maintaining a clean and sterile environment for the wound and allowing it to heal undisturbed.

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  • 10. 

    What does the PICC stand for?

    • A.

      Peripherally injected central catheter

    • B.

      Peripherally inserted central catheter

    • C.

      Placed inverted central catheter

    • D.

      Precisely implanted central catheter

    Correct Answer
    B. Peripherally inserted central catheter
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Peripherally inserted central catheter." This is a type of catheter that is inserted into a peripheral vein, typically in the arm, and then threaded through the vein until it reaches a larger central vein near the heart. It is commonly used for long-term intravenous treatments or for patients who require frequent blood draws.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 20, 2018
    Quiz Created by
    Zlatan Aleksic
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