Figure Of Speech Test 1

16 Questions

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Figure Of Speech Quizzes & Trivia

Figures of speech are the types of words that are formulated to give someone another view other than they’re meaning. Over the past week, we have been able to cover the different figures of speech. The comprehensive test below is designed to examine how much you understood so far, give it a try and come take up other tests like it!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The chug-a, chug-a, chug-a of the train echoed down the hill, while a cloud of smoke rose up to the western sky.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Euphemism

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 2. 
    Substituting the word "euthanasia" for "mercy killing" or "killing the terminaly ill".
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

  • 3. 
    I had so much homework last night that i need to pick up trucks to carry all my books home! 
    • A. 

      Synechdoche

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

  • 4. 
    "The earth luaghs beneath my heavy feet, At the blasphmy in my old jangly walk."
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metonomy

    • C. 

      Personification

  • 5. 
    Pitching pennies with the Pittsburg Pirates in a pitter-patter of rain outside the  Pitti Palace.
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

  • 6. 
    Hyperbole is a kind figure of speech which use of exaggeration terms to purpose of emphasis or heightened effect.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    Methapor is a figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an effermative is expressed by negating its opposite.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    A statement that appears to contradict itself is a Paradox.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    The repetition of an initial consonant sound is a Anophora.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    An implied comparison between two unlike things that actually have something in common.
  • 12. 
    Breaking of discoarse to address some absent person or thing, some abstract quality and an inanimate object.
  • 13. 
    The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. 
  • 14. 
    A figure of speech in which contradictory terms appears side by side.
  • 15. 
    A figure of speech in which a writer or speaker deliberately makes a situation seem like less important or serious than it is.
  • 16.