Olfactory Glands Trivia Quiz

25 Questions | Total Attempts: 194

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Olfactory Glands Trivia Quiz - Quiz

Olfactory glands are a type of nasal glands that are very essential in our bodies. As we get to learn more about these glands and how they work. Do you think you understood that we learned in class these past weeks or do you need a refresher? Why don’t you take up this test and see just how much you can recall? All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Olfactory glands
    • A. 

      Contain neural receptors for the sense of smell

    • B. 

      Form structures called olfactory bulbs

    • C. 

      Form the basement membrane of the olfactory epithelium

    • D. 

      Produce a pigmented mucus that covers the olfactory epithelium

    • E. 

      Are sensitive to aromatic molecules in the air

  • 2. 
    All of the following are true of olfactory pathways, except:
    • A. 

      Decussate at the level of the mammillary bodies

    • B. 

      Carry impulses to the olfactory cortex, hypothalamus, and limbic system

    • C. 

      Are the only sensory pathways to reach the cerebral cortex without first synapsing in the thalamus

    • D. 

      Are subject to cecntral modification by several areas of the brain

    • E. 

      Exhibit a considerable amount of convergence

  • 3. 
    The largest number of taste buds in adults are associated with the
    • A. 

      Circumvallate papillae

    • B. 

      Filiform papillae

    • C. 

      Pharynx

    • D. 

      Larynx

    • E. 

      Fungiform papillae

  • 4. 
    Taste buds are monitored by cranial nerves
    • A. 

      IX, X, XI

    • B. 

      VII, IX, X

    • C. 

      IX, XI, XII

    • D. 

      VII, VIII, IX

    • E. 

      V, VII, IX

  • 5. 
    All of the following are true of the lacrimal glands, except:
    • A. 

      Are more active during childhood

    • B. 

      Produce watery, slightly alkaline secretions

    • C. 

      Produce a secretion that contains lysozyme

    • D. 

      Produce most of the volume of tears

    • E. 

      Are located in pockets in the frontal bones

  • 6. 
    All of the following are true of the vascular tunic of the eye, except:
    • A. 

      Regulates the amount of light entering the eye

    • B. 

      Controls the shape of the lens

    • C. 

      Provides a route for blood vessels and lymphatics that supply tissues of the eye

    • D. 

      Secretes and reabsorbs the aqueous humor

    • E. 

      Contain pain receptors

  • 7. 
    A chalazion is
    • A. 

      An infection in one of the sebaceous glands of the eyelids

    • B. 

      An infection of a lacrimal gland

    • C. 

      An infection of the conjunctiva

    • D. 

      An inflammation of the lacrimal caruncle

    • E. 

      A cyst that results from the infection of a Meibomian gland

  • 8. 
    The lining of the visible outer surface of the eye is the
    • A. 

      Iris

    • B. 

      Canthus

    • C. 

      Conjunctiva

    • D. 

      Anterior chamber

    • E. 

      Cornea

  • 9. 
    The transparent portion of the eye is the
    • A. 

      Iris

    • B. 

      Conjunctiva

    • C. 

      Canthus

    • D. 

      Cornea

    • E. 

      Pupil

  • 10. 
    The pigmented portion of the eye is the
    • A. 

      Conjunctiva

    • B. 

      Canal of Schlemm

    • C. 

      Iris

    • D. 

      Cornea

    • E. 

      Pupil

  • 11. 
    The space between the suspensory ligament and the iris is the
    • A. 

      Posterior chamber

    • B. 

      Pupil

    • C. 

      Anterior chamber

    • D. 

      Vitreous body

    • E. 

      Canal of Schlemm

  • 12. 
    The passageway that drains aqueous humor back to the veins servicing the eye is the
    • A. 

      Lacrimal duct

    • B. 

      Posterior chamber

    • C. 

      Canal of Schlemm

    • D. 

      Anterior chamber

    • E. 

      Pupil

  • 13. 
    The shape of the lens is controlled by the
    • A. 

      Iris

    • B. 

      Pupillary constrictor muscles

    • C. 

      Ciliary muscles

    • D. 

      Pupillary dilator muscles

    • E. 

      Aqueous body

  • 14. 
    An area of the retina that contains only cones and is the site of sharpest vision is the
    • A. 

      Tapetum lucidum

    • B. 

      Outer segment

    • C. 

      Fovea

    • D. 

      Inner segment

    • E. 

      Optic disc

  • 15. 
    A blind spot in the retina occurs where
    • A. 

      Ganglion cells synapse with bipolar cells

    • B. 

      The optic nerve attaches to the retina

    • C. 

      Rod cells are clustered to form the macula

    • D. 

      Amacrine cells are located

    • E. 

      The fovea is located

  • 16. 
    Visual pigments are derivatives of the compound
    • A. 

      Retinal

    • B. 

      CGMP

    • C. 

      Opsin

    • D. 

      Transducin

    • E. 

      Rhodopsin

  • 17. 
    The following steps occur in rods when they are excited by photons of light 1. Membrane sodium channels close 2. Increased phosphodiesterase breaks down cGMP 3. Retinal changes from the 11-cis form to the 11-trans form 4. The membrane hyperpolarizes and the rate of neurotransmitter release declines 5. Opsin activates transducin 6. Opsin activation occurs The proper sequence for these steps is:
    • A. 

      6, 3, 5, 2, 1, 4

    • B. 

      3, 6, 5, 1, 2, 4

    • C. 

      1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 2

    • D. 

      3, 6, 5, 2, 1, 4

    • E. 

      1, 6, 5, 2, 4, 3

  • 18. 
    Which of the following statements conceerning vision is false?
    • A. 

      Fibers of the optic nerve synapse at the lateral geniculates of the thalamus

    • B. 

      The visual cortex of the brain contains a sensory map of the field of vision

    • C. 

      Depth perception is improved when one eye is closed

    • D. 

      Approximately half of the fibers in each optic nerve cross to opposite sides of the brain at the optic chiasm

    • E. 

      The image that is formed on the retina is inverted

  • 19. 
    The ossicles connect the
    • A. 

      Cochlea to the tympanic membrane

    • B. 

      Oval window to the round window

    • C. 

      Tympanic membrane to the round window

    • D. 

      Tympanic membrane to the oval window

    • E. 

      Cochlea to the oval window

  • 20. 
    A structure that allows the middle ear to communicate with the nasopharynx is the
    • A. 

      Pharyngotympanic tube

    • B. 

      Pinna

    • C. 

      Membranous labyrinth

    • D. 

      Bony labyrinth

    • E. 

      Auditory meatus

  • 21. 
    The basic receptors in the inner ear are the
    • A. 

      Hair cells

    • B. 

      Utricles

    • C. 

      Saccules

    • D. 

      Ampullae

    • E. 

      Supporting cells

  • 22. 
    Movement of the cupula in the ampullae of the semicircular canals
    • A. 

      Allows us to hear sounds

    • B. 

      Produces sound

    • C. 

      Stimulates hair cells alerting us to a change in body position with respect to gravity

    • D. 

      Stimulates hair cells alerting us to rotational movements

    • E. 

      Allows us to perceive linear acceleration

  • 23. 
    The following is a list of the steps that occur in the production of an auditory sensation 1. The pressure wave distorts the basilar membrane on its way to the round window 2. Movement of the tympanic membrane causes displacement of the malleus 3. Displacement of the stereocilia stimulates sensory neurons of the cochlear nerve 4. Movement of the malleus causes movement of the incus and stapes 5. Distortion of the basilar membrane forces the hair cells of the organ of Corti toward or away from the tectorial membrane 6. Movement of hte oval window establishes pressure waves in the perilymph of the vestibular duct The proper sequence for these steps is:
    • A. 

      2, 4, 6, 3, 5, 1

    • B. 

      2, 4, 6, 1, 5, 3

    • C. 

      2, 4, 1, 6, 5, 3

    • D. 

      2, 5, 4, 6, 1, 3

    • E. 

      2, 1, 4, 6, 5, 3

  • 24. 
    _____________ deafness results from conditions in the middle ear that block the normal transfer of vibration from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
  • 25. 
    After an injury, Paul finds that he has a difficult time recognizing and interpreting certain sounds. He is still able to hear and his acoustic reflexes are normal. These symptoms imply damage to the
    • A. 

      Inferior colliculus

    • B. 

      Auditory cortex

    • C. 

      Cochlear nucleus

    • D. 

      Cochlear nerve

    • E. 

      All of the above

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