Voting Rights History Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Sophia Smith
Sophia Smith, Content Moderator
Sophia is a quiz virtuoso, celebrated for her talent in curating quizzes that seamlessly blend entertainment and knowledge, creating captivating journeys of discovery and enjoyment at ProProfs.com. With a strong academic background in IT, she brings her passion for technology to crafting quizzes, particularly excelling in IT-themed quizzes, as well as quizzes centered around shows and movies.
Quizzes Created: 1085 | Total Attempts: 2,262,084
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 18

SettingsSettingsSettings
Voting Rights History Quiz - Quiz

Do you know what the rules of voting were in the past? Take this voting rights history quiz to see how much you know about the voting criteria, the people, and other voting factors in history. If you think you know it well, it is a perfect quiz for you to practice. You must give this quiz a try and check out the scores. It will reveal whether you remember everything or if you need to learn more. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What happened to Fannie Lou Hamer after she took the voter registration test in Mississippi in 1962?

    • A.

      She lost her job.

    • B.

      She was evicted from her home.

    • C.

      She was beaten

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    After Fannie Lou Hamer took the voter registration test in Mississippi in 1962, she faced multiple consequences. She not only lost her job but was also evicted from her home. Additionally, she was subjected to physical violence and beaten. These events highlight the immense challenges and discrimination faced by African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, particularly in their struggle for voting rights.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Who among the following was allowed to vote when the Constitution of the United States was first adopted?

    • A.

      Only white men owned property.

    • B.

      All white people.

    • C.

      It varied according to what state you lived in.

    • D.

      Only white Christian men owned property.

    Correct Answer
    C. It varied according to what state you lived in.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is that the eligibility to vote varied according to the state one lived in when the Constitution of the United States was first adopted. This means that different states had different criteria for who could vote, which could include factors such as race, gender, property ownership, and religion. The Constitution did not establish a uniform voting standard, leaving it to the individual states to determine their own voting laws. As a result, voting rights were not universally granted to all white people, only white men who owned property, or only white Christian men who owned property.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Who was murdered for pursuing their constitutional right to vote?

    • A.

      Lamar Smith

    • B.

      Herbert Lee

    • C.

      Rev. George W. Lee

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    All of the above options were murdered for pursuing their constitutional right to vote. Lamar Smith, Herbert Lee, and Rev. George W. Lee were all African American civil rights activists who were killed because they fought for the right to vote during the era of racial segregation and voter suppression in the United States. These individuals were targeted and murdered as a result of their activism and efforts to secure voting rights for African Americans.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    During the 20th century, African Americans were prevented from voting by:

    • A.

      Literacy tests

    • B.

      Intimidation, economic retaliation, and violence

    • C.

      "Poll taxes" that was difficult for poor people to afford

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above." During the 20th century, African Americans were prevented from voting through various means. Intimidation, economic retaliation, and violence were used to discourage African Americans from exercising their right to vote. Additionally, "poll taxes" were imposed, which made it difficult for poor people, including African Americans, to afford the fees required to vote. Furthermore, literacy tests were implemented, which disproportionately affected African Americans due to limited access to education. Thus, all of these factors combined to suppress African American voting rights during the 20th century.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Which of the following was a commonly used strategy to organize for voting rights for African Americans in the South?

    • A.

      Mass demonstrations

    • B.

      Door-to-door canvassing

    • C.

      Sit-ins

    • D.

      Boycotts

    Correct Answer
    B. Door-to-door canvassing
    Explanation
    Door-to-door canvassing was a commonly used strategy to organize for voting rights for African Americans in the South because it allowed organizers to directly engage with individuals in their communities and educate them about their voting rights. By going door-to-door, organizers could have personal conversations, answer questions, and address any concerns or fears that potential voters may have had. This strategy was effective in mobilizing and empowering African Americans to exercise their right to vote, as it provided a more personalized and targeted approach to voter outreach and education.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    The Black Panther symbol was first used by the:

    • A.

      NAACP

    • B.

      Lowndes Country Freedom Party in Alabama

    • C.

      The Oakland Civil Rights Movement

    • D.

      Malcolm X

    Correct Answer
    B. Lowndes Country Freedom Party in Alabama
    Explanation
    The Black Panther symbol was first used by the Lowndes County Freedom Party in Alabama. The party was formed in 1965 and aimed to empower and represent African Americans in the county. The symbol of the black panther was chosen to represent their strength, resilience, and determination in the face of oppression and discrimination. The party later inspired the formation of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in California.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Which of the following women were central to the struggle to win voting rights for African-Americans?

    • A.

      Prathia Hall

    • B.

      Marie Foster

    • C.

      Amelia Boynton

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    All of the above women were central to the struggle to win voting rights for African-Americans. Prathia Hall was a civil rights activist and a prominent leader in the voting rights movement. Marie Foster was a civil rights activist who played a significant role in organizing voter registration drives and advocating for voting rights. Amelia Boynton was a key figure in the Selma to Montgomery marches and played a crucial role in the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Which group has done the most to master the concept of “one person, one vote,” regardless of race, class, or literacy?

    • A.

      The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

    • B.

      The Suffragettes

    • C.

      The Black Panther Party

    • D.

      The "Founding Fathers"

    Correct Answer
    A. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)
    Explanation
    The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) has done the most to master the concept of "one person, one vote," regardless of race, class, or literacy. SNCC was a civil rights organization that played a crucial role in the African American struggle for voting rights. They organized voter registration campaigns, sit-ins, and other nonviolent protests to combat racial discrimination and secure voting rights for all individuals, irrespective of their background. SNCC's dedication to equal voting rights for everyone demonstrates their commitment to the concept of "one person, one vote."

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    What had the most impact on the progress toward greater voting rights?

    • A.

      National civil rights leaders such as the NAACP.

    • B.

      Grassroots activism and organizing.

    • C.

      The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    • D.

      The federal government.

    Correct Answer
    B. Grassroots activism and organizing.
    Explanation
    Grassroots activism and organizing had the most impact on the progress toward greater voting rights because it involved ordinary people at the local level actively advocating for change. Grassroots movements, such as the Civil Rights Movement, played a crucial role in raising awareness, mobilizing communities, and pressuring lawmakers to enact voting rights reforms. These movements included activities like voter registration drives, protests, and community organizing, which ultimately led to significant advancements in voting rights for marginalized communities. National civil rights leaders and events like the March on Washington and the involvement of the federal government were also important, but grassroots activism and organizing were the driving force behind the progress.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    What measures are used to discourage voting or politically disadvantage some populations?

    • A.

      Gerrymandering

    • B.

      Voter ID laws

    • C.

      Rolling back early voting laws

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    All of the options listed - gerrymandering, voter ID laws, and rolling back early voting laws - are measures used to discourage voting or politically disadvantage certain populations. Gerrymandering involves manipulating electoral district boundaries to give one political party an advantage. Voter ID laws require voters to present identification, which can disproportionately affect marginalized communities who may face barriers in obtaining identification. Rolling back early voting laws reduces the opportunities for people to vote, particularly those who may have difficulty accessing polling stations on election day. Together, these measures can suppress voter turnout and undermine the democratic process.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.