Midwifery Revision MCQ Trivia

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| By Julia Donaldson
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Julia Donaldson
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 93,416
Questions: 20 | Viewed: 93,416

1.

What is the lower portion of the heart called?

Answer: Apex
Explanation:
The lower portion of the heart is called the apex. It is the pointed tip of the heart and is located at the bottom, pointing downward and to the left. The apex is formed by the left ventricle, which is the chamber responsible for pumping oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.
2.

What is the outer layer of the heart called?

Answer: Epicardium
Explanation:
The outer layer of the heart is called the epicardium. It is a thin layer of tissue that covers the heart and provides protection. The epicardium also contains blood vessels and nerves that supply the heart with oxygen and nutrients.
3.

Which valve is situated between the right atria and ventricle and is composed of three flaps?

Answer: Tricuspid Valve
Explanation:
The tricuspid valve is situated between the right atria and ventricle and is composed of three flaps. It prevents the backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atria during ventricular contraction.
4.

Which valve is situated between the left atrium and ventricle?

Answer: Mitral Valve
Explanation:
The correct answer is Mitral Valve. The Mitral Valve is situated between the left atrium and ventricle of the heart. It consists of two flaps or cusps that open and close to regulate blood flow from the atrium to the ventricle. When the left atrium contracts, the mitral valve opens, allowing blood to flow into the left ventricle. It then closes to prevent blood from flowing back into the atrium when the ventricle contracts and pumps blood out of the heart.
5.

Which valves are situated in the pulmonary artery and the aorta as they leave the heart?

Answer: Semi-Lunar Valve
Explanation:
The semi-lunar valves are situated in the pulmonary artery and the aorta as they leave the heart. These valves prevent the backflow of blood into the heart, ensuring that blood flows in one direction only. The pulmonary semi-lunar valve is located between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, while the aortic semi-lunar valve is located between the left ventricle and the aorta.
6.

Which vessel carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body?

Answer: Aorta
Explanation:
The aorta is the correct answer because it is the largest artery in the body and carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body. The pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart, while the pulmonary artery carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs. Therefore, the aorta is the vessel that carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.
7.

What is internal respiration?

Answer: Gas exchange between the blood and body cells
Explanation:
Internal respiration refers to the process of gas exchange that occurs between the blood and the body cells. During internal respiration, oxygen from the blood is delivered to the body cells, and carbon dioxide, a waste product of cellular respiration, is transported from the cells back into the bloodstream to be carried away. This process takes place in the capillaries, where the exchange of gases occurs through diffusion. The other options, gas exchange between the alveoli and the blood, and breathing indoors, do not accurately describe internal respiration.
8.

What is external respiration?

Answer: Gas exchange between the alveoli and the blood
Explanation:
External respiration refers to the process of gas exchange between the alveoli in the lungs and the blood. During this process, oxygen from the alveoli diffuses into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, moves from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled. This exchange of gases is vital for maintaining proper oxygen levels in the body and removing carbon dioxide, allowing for cellular respiration and overall bodily function.
9.

Which term describes the stretchability of lung tissue?

Answer: Compliance
Explanation:
Compliance is the term that describes the stretchability of lung tissue. It refers to the ability of the lungs to expand and accommodate changes in volume. Lung compliance is an important factor in respiratory function, as it determines the ease with which the lungs can fill with air during inhalation and the ability to recoil during exhalation. It is influenced by the elasticity and surface tension of the lung tissue, as well as any pathological conditions that may affect lung function.
10.

By how much does the body cells' need for oxygen increase in pregnancy?

Answer: 20%
Explanation:
During pregnancy, the body's need for oxygen increases by 20%. This is because the growing fetus requires more oxygen for its development and growth. The mother's body adapts to this increased demand by increasing the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood and enhancing lung function. This ensures that enough oxygen is supplied to both the mother and the developing baby.
11.

Which hormone causes the maturation of an immature Graafian follicle?

Answer: FSH
Explanation:
FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) is responsible for the maturation of an immature Graafian follicle. FSH is released by the pituitary gland and acts on the ovaries to stimulate the growth and development of follicles. As the follicle matures, it produces estrogen, which further stimulates the development of the uterine lining. LH (luteinizing hormone) is responsible for triggering ovulation and the release of the mature egg from the Graafian follicle.
12.

The production of estrogen by the Graafian follicle inhibits the production of which hormone?

Answer: FHS
Explanation:
The production of estrogen by the Graafian follicle inhibits the production of FHS (follicle-stimulating hormone). Estrogen exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, reducing the secretion of FHS. This helps regulate the menstrual cycle and prevent excessive follicle development.
13.

A surge in which hormone causes ovulation?

Answer: LH
Explanation:
LH, or luteinizing hormone, is responsible for causing ovulation. It is produced by the pituitary gland and stimulates the release of an egg from the ovary. Oestrogen and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) also play a role in the menstrual cycle, but LH is specifically responsible for triggering ovulation.
14.

Which hormone is produced by the corpus luteum?

Answer: Progesterone
Explanation:
The corpus luteum is a temporary endocrine structure that forms in the ovary after ovulation. It is responsible for producing progesterone, which plays a crucial role in preparing the uterus for implantation of a fertilized egg and maintaining pregnancy. Progesterone also helps regulate the menstrual cycle and prepares the breasts for milk production. LH (luteinizing hormone) is responsible for triggering ovulation, while estrogen is primarily produced by the ovaries and plays a role in the development of female reproductive organs and secondary sexual characteristics.
15.

Which stage of the menstrual cycle remains fairly constant regardless of the regularity of a woman's cycle?

Answer: Secretary/Luteal
Explanation:
The stage of the menstrual cycle that remains fairly constant regardless of the regularity of a woman's cycle is the Secretary/Luteal phase. This phase occurs after ovulation and is characterized by the thickening of the uterine lining in preparation for a possible pregnancy. If fertilization does not occur, the uterine lining is shed during menstruation. This phase typically lasts for about 14 days and is regulated by the hormone progesterone.
16.

Which of these facts regarding the vagina is false?

Answer: It is joined to the ovaries.
Explanation:
The given statement "It is joined to the ovaries" is false. The vagina is a muscular canal that connects the uterus to the external opening of the female reproductive system. It is not directly connected to the ovaries, which are located in the pelvic cavity and produce eggs. The ovaries are connected to the uterus by the fallopian tubes, not the vagina.
17.

Which type of fiber is the cervix made of?

Answer: Collagenous
Explanation:
The cervix is made of collagenous fibers. Collagen is a protein that provides strength and support to tissues in the body. In the cervix, collagen fibers help to maintain the structural integrity and stability of the organ. These fibers also play a role in the elasticity of the cervix, allowing it to stretch during childbirth and then return to its original shape.
18.

How much does the non-pregnant uterus weigh?

Answer: 50g
Explanation:
The non-pregnant uterus typically weighs around 50g. This is the average weight for a healthy uterus that is not carrying a pregnancy. It is important to note that the weight can vary slightly depending on factors such as age, hormonal changes, and overall health. However, 50g is a commonly accepted estimate for the weight of a non-pregnant uterus.
19.

Where is oxytocin produced?

Answer: Posterior Pituitary
Explanation:
Oxytocin is produced in the posterior pituitary gland. This gland is located at the base of the brain and is responsible for storing and releasing various hormones, including oxytocin. Oxytocin plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, such as childbirth, breastfeeding, and social bonding. It is released in response to stimuli like nipple stimulation during breastfeeding or uterine contractions during labor. Therefore, the correct answer is the posterior pituitary.
20.

The combination of which hormones stimulates contractions of the uterus?

Answer: Oxytocin & Oestrogen
Explanation:
Oxytocin and estrogen are the hormones that stimulate contractions of the uterus. Oxytocin is responsible for initiating and strengthening contractions during labor and childbirth. Estrogen plays a role in preparing the uterus for contractions by promoting the growth and development of uterine muscles. Together, these hormones work in coordination to facilitate the contractions necessary for labor and delivery.
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