Ushist Unit Test # 1 - Chp 5, 6, 7

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 143

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Ushist Unit Test # 1 - Chp 5, 6, 7


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What ended Native American resistance to the U.S. government on the Plains?
    • A. 

      The Wounded Knee Massacre

    • B. 

      Chief Joseph’s surrender

    • C. 

      The Sand Creek Massacre

    • D. 

      The Battle of the Little Bighorn

  • 2. 
    When was the frontier “closed”?
    • A. 

      At the end of the Civil War

    • B. 

      When two rail lines met at Promontory Summit in 1869

    • C. 

      When the Census Bureau issued a report declaring it closed in 1890

    • D. 

      After the Haymarket Riot

  • 3. 
    During the late 1800s, some people explained the huge inequalities in American society by using a philosophy called
    • A. 

      Entrepreneurs

    • B. 

      Social Darwinism

    • C. 

      Vertical integration

    • D. 

      Robber barons

  • 4. 
    Many women who worked in settlement houses believed in the concept of
    • A. 

      Laissez-faire capitalism

    • B. 

      Vertical integration

    • C. 

      Social Darwinism

    • D. 

      Social gospel

  • 5. 
    You are a 25-year-old merchant living in Massachusetts who dreams of settling in the Great Plains. Which of the following acts of Congress will help you?
    • A. 

      The Pacific Railway Act

    • B. 

      The Homestead Act

    • C. 

      The Sherman Antitrust Act

    • D. 

      The Morrill Act

  • 6. 
    The worst possible outcome of discrimination against African Americans
    • A. 

      Was confinement to separate but equal facilities

    • B. 

      Was thirty days in jail

    • C. 

      Were Jim Crow penalties

    • D. 

      Were lynchings

  • 7. 
    Andrew Carnegie was an entrepreneur because he
    • A. 

      Founded his own steel company and came to dominate the industry

    • B. 

      Believed in social Darwinism

    • C. 

      Devoted his time and fortune to building public libraries and financing education

    • D. 

      Practiced horizontal and vertical integration

  • 8. 
    Nativists resented immigrants because
    • A. 

      Immigrants often took the best-paying jobs

    • B. 

      Immigrants often spoke English better than they did

    • C. 

      They blamed immigrants for increases in crime and poverty and said immigrants took jobs away from Americans

    • D. 

      Settlement houses excluded native-born Americans from social and cultural programs

  • 9. 
    Which phrase will complete the above chart?
    • A. 

      The government moves the Apache to a reservation in Arizona

    • B. 

      A new wave of immigrants come to America from southern and eastern Europe

    • C. 

      Indian students learns to speak English and could not wear traditional clothing

    • D. 

      Japanese students attend separate schools

  • 10. 
    What two companies built the first transcontinental railroad?
    • A. 

      The Union Pacific and the Central Pacific

    • B. 

      The Illinois Central and the California Central

    • C. 

      The Utah Express and the Kansas Express

    • D. 

      The Eastern Central and the Western Central

  • 11. 
    “To protect the workers in their inalienable rights to a higher and better life; to protect them, not only as equals before the law, but also in their health, their homes, their firesides, their liberties; . . . the right to be full sharers in the abundance which is the result of their brain and brawn . . .” -- Samuel Gompers, 1898 How did Gompers try to help workers?
    • A. 

      He organized farmers into political groups like the Farmers’ Alliance

    • B. 

      He was a founding father of the Knights of Labor

    • C. 

      He formed the American Federation of Labor

    • D. 

      He masterminded the Great Railroad Strike

  • 12. 
    Anti-suffragists feared that if women got the right to vote, they would
    • A. 

      Demand in-home childcare while they went to the polls

    • B. 

      Repeal alcohol taxes since they used alcohol for many medicinal purposes

    • C. 

      Ignore their duties at home

    • D. 

      Vote for passage of more healthcare measures and thus have more babies

  • 13. 
    The foundation of the Progressive movement was laid by the
    • A. 

      Politicians

    • B. 

      Muckrakers

    • C. 

      Civil War veterans

    • D. 

      Redeemers

  • 14. 
    This book by Jacob Riis presented visual images of desperate urban poverty
    • A. 

      How the Other Half Lives

    • B. 

      Shame of the Cities

    • C. 

      The Octopus

    • D. 

      Tortilla Flats

  • 15. 
    This event was a turning point for reform in workplace safety
    • A. 

      The IWW textile workers strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts

    • B. 

      Lochner v. New York

    • C. 

      The Teapot Dome scandal

    • D. 

      Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire

  • 16. 
    This governor pushed through reforms on campaign spending, railroad regulation, and civil service in Wisconsin
    • A. 

      Robert M. La Follette

    • B. 

      Samuel M. Jones

    • C. 

      Tom Johnson

    • D. 

      Charles Evans Hughes

  • 17. 
    "On the killing-floor you might easily freeze, if the gang for any reason had to stop for a time. You were apt to be covered with blood, and it would freeze solid; if you leaned against a pillar you would freeze to that . . ." -- Upton Sinclair, The Jungle This novel prompted an investigation into the
    • A. 

      Railroad industry

    • B. 

      Meatpacking industry

    • C. 

      Mining industry

    • D. 

      Department of Labor

  • 18. 
    In the Progressive Era, women reformers campaigned for civil rights, children’s health and welfare, and
    • A. 

      Pacifism

    • B. 

      The spoils system

    • C. 

      Prohibition

    • D. 

      Retirement benefits

  • 19. 
    She was arrested for “knowingly, wrongfully, and unlawfully” voting in 1872.
    • A. 

      Carrie Nation

    • B. 

      Susan B. Anthony

    • C. 

      Harriet Tubman

    • D. 

      Lucy Hayes

  • 20. 
    This cartoon illustrates President Roosevelt’s national reputation as a
    • A. 

      Conservationist

    • B. 

      Trust buster

    • C. 

      Rough rider

    • D. 

      Negotiator

  • 21. 
    The struggle for women’s suffrage resulted in a final victory with the ratification of the 
    • A. 

      NAWSA

    • B. 

      Nineteenth Amendment

    • C. 

      Constitution

    • D. 

      Suffrage Act

  • 22. 
    In the 15 years immediately following the passage of the New York Tenement Act of 1901, what evidence showed that the environment for residents was healthier?
    • A. 

      The amount of nutritious food sold by New York grocers increased

    • B. 

      The number of wrongful death lawsuits went down

    • C. 

      Landlords’ insurance rates dropped

    • D. 

      Death rates in New York dropped dramatically

  • 23. 
    Which aims did the NAACP and the ADL share?
    • A. 

      Insuring the rights of the disabled

    • B. 

      Demanding increased safety at work

    • C. 

      Fighting negative stereotyping of a minority

    • D. 

      Increasing the availability of safe housing

  • 24. 
    How did the lawyer for the state of Oregon convince the Supreme Court to uphold a law that limited women to a 10-hour workday?
    • A. 

      He took the justices to visit a factory

    • B. 

      He created media interest in the women’s stories

    • C. 

      He cited concrete evidence linking working long hours with poor health

    • D. 

      He forced a laundry owner to admit that women workers were shackled to their workstations

  • 25. 
    Why was the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire a landmark in labor history?
    • A. 

      Owners and families went to court to determine the amount of damages owed.

    • B. 

      The tragedy gave labor an edge in contract negotiations.

    • C. 

      The fire set off strikes across the nation.

    • D. 

      The tragedy led to New York State reforms of safety measures, factory inspections, and sanitation standards that became a nationwide model.

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