Prelims Examination: Teaching Of Listening

30 Questions | Total Attempts: 74

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Prelims Examination: Teaching Of Listening

This timed 30-item test deals with the TEACHING OF LISTENING. Test takers must complete and passed the test before they can submit their digital certificate to University Learning Management site (e-learning). PRINT SCREEN THE WHOLE PAGE INDICATING THE DETAILS OF YOUR TEST RESULT SCORE AND PERCENTAGE. Paste it in an MS Word File and then submit as an. Docx file. Only digital certificates with a rating of 95% and above are valid for recording. Good luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Jack Richards explained this view of listening based on the assumption that the main function of listening in second language learning is to facilitate understanding of spoken discourse.
    • A. 

      Listening as Comprehension

    • B. 

      Listening as Acquisition

  • 2. 
    Jack Richards  argued that we won’t learn anything from input we hear and understand unless we notice something about the input.  What perspective of listening is described?
    • A. 

      Listening as Comprehension

    • B. 

      Listening as Acquisition

  • 3. 
    This listening process refers to using the incoming input as the basis for understanding the message. Comprehension begins with the received data that is analyzed as successive levels of organization – sounds, words, clauses, sentences, texts – until meaning is derived. Comprehension is viewed as a process of decoding.
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Processing

    • B. 

      Top Down Processing

  • 4. 
    This listening process refers to the use of background knowledge in understanding the meaning of a message.
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Processing

    • B. 

      Top Down Processing

  • 5. 
    Imagine someone said the following to you:“The guy I sat next to on the bus this morning on the way to work was telling me he runs a Thai restaurant in Chinatown. Apparently, it’s very popular at the moment.”We have to mentally break the utterances down into its components.
    • The guy
    • I sat next to on the bus
    • this morning
    • was telling me
    • he runs a Thai restaurant in Chinatown
    • apparently it’s very popular
    • at the moment
    The chunks help us identify the underlying propositions the utterances express, namely:
    • I was on the bus.
    • There was a guy next to me.
    • We talked.
    • He said he runs a Thai restaurant.
    • It’s in Chinatown.
    • It’s very popular now
    It is these units of meaning that we remember, and not the form in which we initially heard them. Our knowledge of grammar helps us find the appropriate chunks, and the speaker also assists us in this process through intonation and pausing.  What is this listening process?
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Process

    • B. 

      Top Down Process

  • 6. 
    Consider this example – Imagine someone say the following to a colleague at an office one morning:“I am going to the dentist this afternoon.”This utterance activates a schema for “going to the dentist.” This schema can be thought of as organized around the following dimensions:
    • A setting (e.g., the dentist’s office)
    • Participants (e.g., the dentist, the patient, the dentist’s assistant)
    • Goals (e.g., to have a checkup or to replace a filling)
    • Procedures (e.g., injections, drilling, rinsing)
    • Outcomes (e.g., fixing the problem, pain, discomfort)
    When I return to my office, the following exchange takes place with my colleague:
    • “So how was it?”
    • “Fine. I didn’t feel a thing.”
    Because speaker and hearer share understanding of the “going to the dentist” schema, the details of the visit need not be spelled out.  What listening process occurred? 
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Process

    • B. 

      Top Down Process

  • 7. 
    The following exercises develop top down process in the the learner except for ---
    • A. 

      Use key words to construct the schema of a discourse

    • B. 

      Use stress and intonation to identify word and sentence functions

    • C. 

      Infer the role of the participants and their goals

    • D. 

      Infer unstated details of a situation

  • 8. 
    Which process is developed in this class activity? dictation
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Process

    • B. 

      Top Down Process

    • C. 

      Combination of both processes

  • 9. 
    Which process is described in this activity? 
    • Students read a list of key points to be covered in a talk, then listen to see which ones are mentioned.
    • A. 

      Bottom Up Process

    • B. 

      Top Down Process

    • C. 

      Combination of both processes

  • 10. 
    Gary Buck (2001) identified this strategy in listening as mental activities related to comprehending and storing input in working memory or long-term memory for later retrieval.
    • A. 

      Cognitive Strategies

    • B. 

      Metacognitive Strategies

  • 11. 
    Gary Buck (2001) identified this strategy in listening as those conscious or unconscious mental activities that perform an executive function in the management of cognitive strategies.
    • A. 

      Cognitive Strategies

    • B. 

      Metacognitive Strategies

  • 12. 
    To what strategy did Gary Buck describe the following activities? 
    • Comprehension processes: Associated with the processing of linguistic and nonlinguistic input
    • Storing and memory processes: Associated with the storing of linguistic and nonlinguistic input in working memory or long-term memory
    • Using and retrieval processes: Associated with accessing memory, to be readied for output
    • A. 

      Cognitive Strategies

    • B. 

      Metacognitive Strategies

  • 13. 
    To what strategy did Gary Buck describe the following activities? 
    • Assessing the situation: Taking stock of conditions surrounding a language task by assessing one’s own knowledge, one’s available internal and external resources, and the constraints of the situation before engaging in a task
    • Monitoring: Determining the effectiveness of one’s own or another’s performance while engaged in a task
    • Self-evaluating: Determining the effectiveness of one’s own or another’s performance after engaging in the activity
    • Self-testing: Testing oneself to determine the effectiveness of one’s own language use or the lack thereof
    • A. 

      Cognitive Strategies

    • B. 

      Metacognitive Strategies

  • 14. 
    Jack Richards proposed a two part cycle of activities in teaching listening as acquisition.  Which cycle is referred to in this definition? "It involve returning to the listening texts that served as the basis for comprehension activities and using them as the basis for language awareness." 
    • A. 

      Noticing Activities

    • B. 

      Restructuring Activities

  • 15. 
    Jack Richards proposed a two part cycle of activities in teaching listening as acquisition.  Which cycle is referred to in this definition? "These are oral or written tasks that involve productive use of selected items from the listening text." 
    • A. 

      Noticing Activities

    • B. 

      Restructuring Activities

  • 16. 
    To what cycle of activities are the following identified?
    1. Paired reading of the tape scripts in the case of conversational texts
    2. Written sentence-completion tasks requiring use of expressions and other linguistic items that occurred in the texts
    3. Dialog practice that incorporates items from the text
    4. Role plays in which students are required to use key language from the texts 
    • A. 

      Noticing Activities

    • B. 

      Restructuring Activities

  • 17. 
    To what cycle of activities are the following identified?
    1. Identify differences between what they hear and a printed version of the text
    2. Complete a cloze version of the text
    3. Complete sentences stems taken from the text
    4. Check off entries from a list of expressions that occurred in the text
    • A. 

      Noticing Activities

    • B. 

      Restructuring Activities

  • 18. 
    Study this simple listening dialogue:
    • Woman: We’re going out to dinner after class. Do you want to come, too?
    • Man: Maybe. Where are you going?
    • Woman: Pizza King.
    • Man: Pizza? I love pizza!
    After listening, the teacher would ask: “What’s the most important idea in this conversation? What is the main thing they are talking about?”What reason for listening is pointed out? 
    • A. 

      Listening for the Main Idea

    • B. 

      Listening for Details

    • C. 

      Listening and Making Inferences

  • 19. 
    Study this simple listening dialogue:
    • Woman: We’re going out to dinner after class. Do you want to come, too?
    • Man: Maybe. Where are you going?
    • Woman: Pizza King.
    • Man: Pizza? I love pizza!
    After listening, the teacher would ask: “Is the man going to go with them?”What reason for listening is pointed out? 
    • A. 

      Listening for the Main Idea

    • B. 

      Listening for Details

    • C. 

      Listening and Making Inferences

  • 20. 
    Study this simple listening dialogue:
    • Woman: We’re going out to dinner after class. Do you want to come, too?
    • Man: Maybe. Where are you going?
    • Woman: Pizza King.
    • Man: Pizza? I love pizza!
    After listening, the teacher would ask: “What are they going to eat?”What reason for listening is pointed out? 
    • A. 

      Listening for the Main Idea

    • B. 

      Listening for Details

    • C. 

      Listening and Making Inferences

  • 21. 
    Which of the following variables do not affect and effect successful listening? 
    • A. 

      Noise

    • B. 

      Repetition

    • C. 

      Content

    • D. 

      Content

    • E. 

      Visuals

  • 22. 
    What part of a METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY is indicated by the following steps?
    1. Set a purpose or decide in advance what to listen for
    2. Decide if more linguistic or background knowledge is needed
    3. Determine whether to enter the text from the top down (attend to the overall meaning) or from the bottom up (focus on the words and phrases)
    • A. 

      Before listening

    • B. 

      During and after listening

    • C. 

      After listening

  • 23. 
    What part of a METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY is indicated by the following steps?
    1. Verify predictions and check for inaccurate guesses
    2. Decide what is and is not important to understand
    3. Listen/view again to check comprehension
    4. Ask for help
    • A. 

      Before listening

    • B. 

      During and after listening

    • C. 

      After listening

  • 24. 
    What part of a METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY is indicated by the following steps?
    1. Evaluate comprehension in a particular task or area
    2. Evaluate overall progress in listening and in particular types of listening tasks
    3. Decide if the strategies used were appropriate for the purpose and for the task
    4. Modify strategies if necessary
    • A. 

      Before listening

    • B. 

      During and after listening

    • C. 

      After listening

  • 25. 
    Among the four skills, foreign language learners often complain that listening is the most difficult to acquire. One major reason for students’ poor listening skill is that listening is often neglected in language teaching for various reasons except for --
    • A. 

      Lack of teaching materials (audio and video tape);

    • B. 

      Listening is not included on many important tests;

    • C. 

      Lack of real-life situations where language learners need to understand spoken English;

    • D. 

      Lack of confidence of many listeners

    • E. 

      Lessons tend to test rather than train students’ listening skills.