Understanding Exposure, Chapter 3: Shutter Speed

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 299

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Speed Quizzes & Trivia

A test to assess a reader's knowledge of shutter speed based on Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure".


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    How does shutter speed effect a photo?
    • A. 

      Slow shutter speeds freeze motion and let more light in; fast shutter speeds blur motion and let less light in

    • B. 

      Slow shutter speeds blur motion and let more light in; fast shutter speeds freeze motion and let less light in

    • C. 

      Slow shutter speeds freeze motion and let less light in; fast shutter speeds blur motion and let more light in

    • D. 

      Slow shutter speeds blur motion and let less light in; fast shutter speeds blur motion and let more light in

  • 2. 
    When is shutter speed more important than aperture?
    • A. 

      Never

    • B. 

      When you want to show the motion of a moving subject or the camera

    • C. 

      In low light, when you are not using a tripod

    • D. 

      Shutter speed and aperture are independent, they don't effect one another.

  • 3. 
    What is the "bulb" setting for?
    • A. 

      It's only used when using flash

    • B. 

      It's used when your lens doesn't have the aperture needed to match the shutter speed you desire.

    • C. 

      It's for exposures over 30 seconds long, but requires a "bulb" cable.

    • D. 

      It's a left-over from film days that's no longer really necessary with digital.

  • 4. 
    What's an appropriate shutter speed to try when attempting a panned shot of a horse running, or a car?
    • A. 

      1 second

    • B. 

      1/60

    • C. 

      1/320

    • D. 

      1/1000

  • 5. 
    What's an appropriate shutter speed to try when attempting to get a city shot at dusk with the headlights and taillights of the cars streaked as they pass on the highway?
    • A. 

      15 seconds

    • B. 

      1 second

    • C. 

      1/60

    • D. 

      1/500

  • 6. 
    What shutter speed would you try to freeze the motion of a race car zooming past or a seagull in flight in front of you?
    • A. 

      1/60

    • B. 

      1/125

    • C. 

      1/250

    • D. 

      1/1000

  • 7. 
    Why didn't Bryan's attempt at getting a panned shot of a frisbee in the sky work out for him?
    • A. 

      There was nothing in the background to show the pan's blur

    • B. 

      It wasn't moving fast enough

    • C. 

      It was both rotating and moving horizontaly

    • D. 

      It was moving in an arc

  • 8. 
    What shutter speed would you use to blur the water in a waterfall?
    • A. 

      10 seconds

    • B. 

      1/6

    • C. 

      1/60

    • D. 

      1/125

  • 9. 
    You are trying to blur the motion of the water in a waterfall, you set your shutter speed and scroll through your apertures in search of one that'll give you "0" on your light meter.  But, when you hit f/22 you can't go any further and your light meter says "+1".  You take a photo with these settings and, as expected, it comes out too bright.  Why?
    • A. 

      There's too much light

    • B. 

      You need a faster lens

    • C. 

      You need a lower ISO, if possible

    • D. 

      You need a higher ISO, if possible

  • 10. 
    If you attached your camera to the head rest on the passenger seat in your car, facing forward and took photos with a relatively slow shutter speed while driving straight, what would you expect to get as a result?
    • A. 

      A colorful blur of the dashboard of your car, the car in front of you, the street, and the trees, houses, and other cars around you.

    • B. 

      A colorful blur of the car in front of you, the street, and the trees, houses, and other cars, but the dashboard of your car would be sharp.

    • C. 

      A colorful blur of the street, trees, houses and other cars, but both your dashboard and the car in front of you would remain sharp.

    • D. 

      Anything that's moving faster than you would be blurred.