TExES ELA And Reading 4-8 Practice Test

35 Questions | Total Attempts: 3732

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TExES ELA And Reading 4-8 Practice Test

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Students in a middle school class have been studying the battle of the Alamo.The teacher plans a role-playing activityto help structure whole-class discussionabout the Alamo. During the discussion,one student will play the role of anewspaper reporter and interview otherstudents who assume the roles of varioushistorical figures (e.g., Santa Anna, SamHouston, soldiers in the Mexican army).This instructional strategy is likely topromote students' oral languageproficiency primarily by helping thestudents:
    • A. 

      Understand how differing points of view affect spoken messages.

    • B. 

      Recognize differences between spoken and written language.

    • C. 

      Learn how to adapt spoken language for informal occasions.

    • D. 

      Expand their speaking and listening vocabularies.

  • 2. 
    A fourth-grade class has been reading folktales from around the world. Which of thefollowing oral language activities wouldbe most effective in promoting students'multicultural awareness and appreciation?
    • A. 

      Students discuss folk tales from various countries and then read aloud and discuss descriptions of the geography and cultural characteristics of each country.

    • B. 

      The teacher guides students to discuss some features that folk tales of various countries have in common as well as some of the unique features of each culture's folk tales.

    • C. 

      Students read aloud "folk tales" they have written themselves and then review folk tales from various countries and decide which culture's folk tales most closely resemble their own.

    • D. 

      The teacher helps each student select a folk tale, present it to the class, and answer any questions that other students in the class may have about the folk tale's plot or characters.

  • 3. 
    A teacher reads aloud a story to a studentwho is in the emergent literacy stageof reading development. The teacherwants to assess the student's literalcomprehension of the sequence of eventsin the story. Which of the followingassessment strategies would be mostappropriate for this purpose?
    • A. 

      Encouraging the student to begin by describing the beginning and the end of the story

    • B. 

      Asking the student to identify the most important episode in the story

    • C. 

      Providing the student with visual aids to use in explaining what happened in the story

    • D. 

      Asking the student to explain the consequences of the characters' actions

  • 4. 
    A teacher regularly analyzes the attemptedspellings of emergent readers. In additionto providing information about students'spelling development, this approachwould best help the teacher assessstudents':
    • A. 

      Level of reading fluency.

    • B. 

      Use of word identification strategies.

    • C. 

      Ability to apply phonics skills.

    • D. 

      Knowledge of comprehension strategies.

  • 5. 
    A teacher reads aloud a story to emergentreaders. The teacher guides students todiscuss the story, focusing particularattention on students' understanding ofthe story's ending. Then the teacherasks students to imagine and describeanother adventure that the main charactersin the story might have. This final stepof the activity is most likely to benefitstudents by:
    • A. 

      Helping them identify text structures.

    • B. 

      Promoting development of their evaluative comprehension skills.

    • C. 

      Helping them identify story elements.

    • D. 

      Promoting development of their inferential comprehension skills.

  • 6. 
    A teacher is planning an activity inwhich students will count the phonemescontained within various words. Theteacher begins by selecting words with various phonemes. Which of the following words selected by the teacher contains five phonemes?
    • A. 

      Stamp

    • B. 

      Trail

    • C. 

      Brush

    • D. 

      Grape

  • 7. 
    A teacher is working with a group ofstudents in the emergent literacy stage ofreading development who have had littleexperience with books. Which of thefollowing instructional activities wouldbest promote the students' understandingof the relationship between written andspoken words?
    • A. 

      Each student pretends to read a picture book by telling a story while turning the pages.

    • B. 

      The teacher displays a big book and points to each word as she reads the book aloud.

    • C. 

      Each student points to each word in a written sentence, and then the teacher reads aloud the sentence.

    • D. 

      The teacher models for students how to move manipulatives to count the words in a spoken sentence.

  • 8. 
    Which of the following strategies wouldbest promote beginning readers' automaticrecognition of high-frequency, irregularsight words?
    • A. 

      Strengthening students' phonemic awareness skills

    • B. 

      Having the students engage in repeated readings of familiar texts at their independent reading levels

    • C. 

      Reinforcing students' knowledge of letter-sound correspondence

    • D. 

      Helping the students identify each word by dividing it into separate syllables or clusters of letters

  • 9. 
    To promote students' reading fluency,a fifth-grade teacher plans activities inwhich students and their assigned partnerswill engage in repeated oral readings.When the teacher assembles readingmaterials for this purpose, it would bemost important to assign each pair ofstudents passages from a text that:
    • A. 

      Both partners are capable of reading aloud with no more than 5 word recognition errors per 100 words of text.

    • B. 

      The students have previewed and selected themselves.

    • C. 

      Both partners are capable of reading aloud with no more than 25 word recognition errors per 100 words of text.

    • D. 

      The students have been reading in connection with content-area study.

  • 10. 
    Students in a middle school class arelearning about the westward movementof pioneers in the United States duringthe nineteenth century. The teacher plansto have students read several selectionson this topic and then prepare reports.The teacher is concerned about howmeaningful the assignment will be forAlicia, a student whose family moved tothe United States from Venezuela a yearago. Alicia's speaking and oral readingskills in English are strong, but shesometimes has comprehension difficulties.The teacher believes that these difficultiesoften reflect lack of familiarity with thetopic of the selection. Which of thefollowing strategies most likely would beeffective in helping Alicia complete theassignment successfully and make it ameaningful learning experience for her?
    • A. 

      Urging Alicia to take detailed notes as she reads to reinforce her understanding of the historical context depicted in the text

    • B. 

      Providing Alicia with opportunities to talk about how her own experience of moving to the United States compares with the pioneers' experiences described in the assigned readings

    • C. 

      Drawing Alicia's attention to facts and concepts that feature prominently in more than one of the assigned selections to help her recognize which ideas are most important

    • D. 

      Encouraging Alicia to write her first draft of the assigned report in Spanish and then translate it into English

  • 11. 
    Ms. Lennox, a social studies teacher, andMr. Vale, a reading teacher, work with agroup of middle school students. Early inthe school year, Ms. Lennox mentions thatthe students are having difficulty retaininginformation from their geography textbook.Which of the following would bethe most appropriate suggestion forMr. Vale to offer Ms. Lennox?
    • A. 

      Have the students concentrate on transitional words to keep track of the relationship among ideas.

    • B. 

      Encourage the students to focus on the last sentence of each paragraph to extract summary information.

    • C. 

      Have the students read each assignment slowly, looking up definitions of unfamiliar terms.

    • D. 

      Encourage the students to preview the text to anticipate its content and recall related knowledge.

  • 12. 
    A middle school teacher wants to improvestudents' comprehension of informationaltexts by helping the students analyzecomparison/contrast text structures.Which of the following instructionalstrategies would best address this goal?
    • A. 

      Students read two different texts that address the same topic and then meet in small discussion groups to compare/contrast the two texts.

    • B. 

      The teacher models for students how to write a complex sentence that compares/contrasts two different items or ideas.

    • C. 

      Each student outlines the main ideas and significant details in two comparison/contrast texts on a given subject.

    • D. 

      The teacher helps students create a Venn diagram to summarize a comparison/contrast text.

  • 13. 
    Students in a middle school class havebeen learning about active and passiveverbs. Which of the following instructionalactivities would best help studentsrecognize and understand differencesbetween the active and passive voice?
    • A. 

      Working with partners, students convert passive sentences to the active voice; then the teacher guides students to discuss how these changes affect tone and meaning.

    • B. 

      Students write a paragraph on an assigned topic and then identify whether each sentence in the paragraph is in the active or the passive voice.

    • C. 

      Working in small groups, students use active and passive sentences provided by the teacher as models to develop their own sets of active and passive sentences.

    • D. 

      Students keep ongoing lists of memorable sentences they encounter over several days and decide whether each sentence is in the active or passive voice.

  • 14. 
    Use the student writing sample below toanswer the question that follows.We went on a traen to the bech. I saw a red sale bote.The writing sample illustrated above moststrongly suggests that the student:
    • A. 

      Is in the transitional stage of spelling development and would benefit from instruction on vowel digraphs.

    • B. 

      Lacks an understanding of lettersound correspondence and would benefit from basic phonics instruction.

    • C. 

      Is in the phonetic stage of spelling development and would benefit from phonemic awareness instruction.

    • D. 

      Lacks the ability to distinguish vowel sounds and would benefit from varied oral language activities.

  • 15. 
    Which of the following upper-elementarystudents would benefit most from the useof word processing equipment for writing?
    • A. 

      Alice, who often needs the teacher's help in choosing a topic to write about

    • B. 

      Bernardo, who repeatedly confuses words that have the same pronunciation but are spelled differently

    • C. 

      Delia, who has difficulty making logical transitions between paragraphs

    • D. 

      Neil, who is often discouraged by the time-consuming process of revision

  • 16. 
    For the past week, students inMs. Burgess's fifth-grade classhave been writing original stories.Ms. Burgess observes that some studentsare spending their daily writing periodadding on to their stories, making themlonger but not necessarily better, andmaking no revisions except occasionalcorrections of misspelled words. Shewants to encourage these students to takea broader, more exploratory approach torevision—to review and evaluate theirwork and then reshape it based on newinsights. Which of the following teachingstrategies would be most effective inachieving this goal?
    • A. 

      Asking students to think about what parts of their story are most important and whether they have described these parts clearly and effectively

    • B. 

      Encouraging each student to place an appropriate limit on the length of his or her story based on the number of characters and events the student intends to include

    • C. 

      Having students brainstorm words related to the subject of the stories they are writing and decide which words might be incorporated in their work

    • D. 

      Suggesting that students begin each writing period by drawing an illustration that depicts the main story idea they wish to convey in their writing for that day

  • 17. 
    A middle school teacher wants to helpstudents learn how to offer constructivefeedback when they confer with theirpartners during the initial stage of awriting project. Which of the followingguidelines for students would be mostappropriate in this context?
    • A. 

      Comment briefly on the content, form, and mechanics of your partner's writing.

    • B. 

      Concentrate on helping your partner develop clear and concise topic sentences for every paragraph.

    • C. 

      Suggest improvements in the mechanics of writing, but avoid criticizing your partner's ideas.

    • D. 

      Respond to your partner's planning so far, and suggest ideas that he or she may not have considered.

  • 18. 
    An eighth-grade teacher plans the following activities in connection with a field trip to view aphotojournalism exhibit at a local museum.• Before the trip, students study how elements of design and photographic techniquesexpress ideas and communicate meaning.• The teacher gives students a list of questions to read and consider as they view theexhibit.• After the trip, students work in small groups to write answers to the questions.• In a whole-class discussion, students share their reactions to the exhibit and their groups'answers to the questions.Which of the following additionalactivities would best help the teacherinformally assess students' understandingof the way visual images and elements ofdesign create meaning?
    • A. 

      Students work in small groups to prepare their own exhibits by using photographs from newspapers and magazines to tell a story.

    • B. 

      Each student researches one photojournalist featured at the exhibit and presents a brief report on his or her work in the field.

    • C. 

      Students write an essay about the photojournalism exhibit at the museum, analyzing particular photographs they liked.

    • D. 

      Each student writes a simulated magazine article and creates a drawing or illustration to accompany the article.

  • 19. 
    A middle school teacher designs anactivity in which students watch a twentyminutefilm with the sound turned off.Periodically, the teacher stops the film,and students discuss what they have seen.This instructional activity is most likely topromote students' critical-viewing skills inwhich of the following ways?
    • A. 

      Focusing students' attention on differences between visual messages and oral communication

    • B. 

      Helping students identify common film cliches by focusing attention on key images in short film segments

    • C. 

      Focusing students' attention on the relationship between visual imagery and narration in film

    • D. 

      Helping students interpret and evaluate visual images in film by focusing attention on visual details

  • 20. 
    Which of the following instructionalstrategies would best help fourth-gradestudents learn to self-monitor their readingcomprehension?
    • A. 

      Students take detailed notes while reading texts written at their instructional reading levels and then answer comprehension questions.

    • B. 

      The teacher models the process of applying word identification strategies while reading aloud a grade-appropriate text.

    • C. 

      Students read an age-appropriate story and then create a story map to describe the plot, characters, and setting of the story.

    • D. 

      The teacher displays a passage, reads it aloud, and models a thinkaloud approach by pausing to question herself about the meaning of what she is reading.

  • 21. 
    Use the information and the "story tree" below to answer the four questions that follow.Students in Mr. Wiggins's fifth-grade class study different types of literature over the courseof the school year. Their first unit was on fantasy. As part of the introduction for that unit,Mr. Wiggins put up a large blank outline of a tree in the library corner of the classroom.He explained to his students that this was a "story tree" and that each of its major branchesrepresented something different to think about when reading a literary work. As the unitprogressed, Mr. Wiggins used guided discussion to challenge his students to label each majorbranch of the tree. He also encouraged them to think of questions they should ask themselves as they read to help them evaluate all the components of a particular selection. These questions were added to appropriate parts of the tree in the shape of clumps of leaves. The completed tree created by the class during the fantasy unit is pictured below.Characters:Who are the bad characters? What do they want? Why do they want it? How do they go about getting it?Which of the characters have special powers? What are they? Does the story say how they got them?Who are the good characters? How can you tell the are the "good guys"? What do they want to accomplish? Why is this important to them?The questions on the "characters"branch of the story tree are most likelyto strengthen students' inferentialcomprehension by prompting thestudents to:
    • A. 

      Distinguish fact from opinion.

    • B. 

      Compare the effectiveness of different courses of action.

    • C. 

      Evaluate motives behind actions.

    • D. 

      Distinguish alternative solutions to problems.

  • 22. 
    Mr. Wiggins's use of the story tree is mostlikely to help students develop which ofthe following reading skills?
    • A. 

      Critical analysis of literature

    • B. 

      Understanding of historical trends in literary forms

    • C. 

      Analysis of the effects of word choice on readers' responses

    • D. 

      Understanding of literary devices such as caricature and foreshadowing

  • 23. 
    Which of the following uses of the storytree would best help students applymetacognitive skills to enhance theircomprehension?
    • A. 

      Encourage students to ask themselves questions similar to those in the story tree when reading or writing stories independently.

    • B. 

      Have students check to make sure that the book reports they write reflect the format outlined in the story tree.

    • C. 

      Advise students to copy the story tree into their reading journal so they can refer to it when reading independently.

    • D. 

      Help students create concept webs to analyze stories, and then guide the students to compare the webs with the story tree.

  • 24. 
    According to the Texas EssentialKnowledge and Skills (TEKS), studentsin the sixth grade should be able to usegraphic sources of information to addressresearch questions. Students are mostlikely to develop these skills if they havehad opportunities to:
    • A. 

      Locate graphic information about a specific topic in an encyclopedia or other reference book.

    • B. 

      Create their own tables and charts summarizing the results of a peer survey on an age-appropriate topic.

    • C. 

      Collaborate with a partner to make an outline summarizing the features of different graphic formats.

    • D. 

      Make accurate copies of tables, charts, maps, and other graphic information provided by the teacher.

  • 25. 
    Read the worksheet below, completed by a fourth grader; then answer the two questionsthat follow.Name: _____________ Date:Read the following passage and answer the questions.The BirthdayHank woke up very excited on Saturday morning because it was his birthday. His familywas planning a big party for him, with lots of good food, balloons, and a cake with ninecandles. It wasn't the party that Hank was most excited about, though. He was sure thiswould be the day when he finally got the remote-control car he wanted more than anything.He first saw the shiny red car in the front window of Mitchell's Toy Store a month ago. Since then, it was all he could think about.Later in the day, it finally was time for Hank to open his presents. His parents gavehim a basketball and sneakers. From his sisters, he received a book about making paperairplanes. His little brother gave him a special rock he had found. Finally, there was onlythe present from his grandfather left to open. This was his last hope. He ripped off the paperand opened the box. Inside there was a T-shirt that said "Number One Grandson." Hankalmost groaned out loud, but instead he put a smile on his face and politely thanked hisgrandfather for the shirt.Then he said silently to himself, "Maybe next year."1. How does Hank feel when he wakes up? Why does he feel this way?       Excited cause it's his birthday2. What does Hank want most for his birthday?       A remote-control car3. What presents does Hank get for his birthday?       shirt that says, Number One Grandson, basketball, sneekers, book, rock4. How does Hank probably feel when he opens the present from his grandfather and seeswhat is inside? What clue in the story tells you he feels this way?      Happy. It says he smiles and says thank you.Brendan's performance on this worksheetsuggests that he would benefit most fromreading instruction to strengthen his:
    • A. 

      Literal comprehension.

    • B. 

      Inferential comprehension.

    • C. 

      Word-recognition skills.

    • D. 

      Vocabulary development.

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