Survey: Practice Exam 3

103 Questions | Total Attempts: 41

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Practice Exam Quizzes & Trivia

SURVEY: BROADCAST JOURNALISM-Unit 3 Practice Exam


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Medical hucksters who sold mail order remedies to radio listeners caught the interest of the Federal Radio Commission.  What happened to radio “Doctors” John R. Brinkley and Norman “TNT” Baker? 
    • A. 

      FRC agents closed down their control rooms and shut off their transmitters

    • B. 

      Brinkley and Baker received suspended prison sentences for medical fraud

    • C. 

      They won in court the right to broadcast applying the legal doctrine, “listener beware”

    • D. 

      Brinkley and Baker moved their broadcasts to the Internet

    • E. 

      The FRC refused to renew their radio licenses

  • 2. 
    In the 1930s, radio evangelists in California caught the attention of federal regulators. Which minister caused interference by refusing to broadcast on a single frequency? 
    • A. 

      Robert Shuler (KEGF)

    • B. 

      Aimee Semple McPherson (KSFG)

    • C. 

      Father Coughlin (WOW)

    • D. 

      Tammy Faye Baker (WSB)

    • E. 

      Pat Robertson (WTAR)

  • 3. 
    One of the arguments against broadcast content regulation was advanced by President Ronald Reagan’s appointment to the Federal Communications Commission.  How did Mark Fowler, FCC chair characterize television? 
    • A. 

      "a vast wasteland"

    • B. 

      "a public trustee"

    • C. 

      "a household appliance...toaster with pictures"

    • D. 

      "diamond in the rough"

    • E. 

      "broadband universe in a jewel-encrusted box"

  • 4. 
    The FCC deregulated radio in 1981 and commercial television in 1985.  How did Congress influence government oversight with respect to the FCC during the 1980s? 
    • A. 

      It reduced the size of the commission from seven to five members.

    • B. 

      It added the cable bureau to the FCC.

    • C. 

      It called for FCC regulation of satellite television.

    • D. 

      It called for new rules to control cellular phones and the Internet.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 5. 
    The FCC takes three principal steps in drafting new rules, identified by the abbreviation of the published announcements.  Which one of the following is most important because it means a resolution has been reached? 
    • A. 

      Notice of Inquiry (NOI)

    • B. 

      Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM)

    • C. 

      Report and Order (R&O)

    • D. 

      Federal Register (FR)

    • E. 

      Temporary Restraining Order (TRO)

  • 6. 
    In the eyes of the federal government, what term best defines the role of licensed broadcasters? 
    • A. 

      Liberal mainstream media

    • B. 

      Government watchdogs

    • C. 

      Private enterprise

    • D. 

      Public trustees

    • E. 

      Entertainment entrepreneurs

  • 7. 
    The sinking of the Titanic revealed what oversight in the Wireless Ship Act of 1910? 
    • A. 

      The law failed to specify ocean steamers.

    • B. 

      The law failed to define how many passengers had to be on board.

    • C. 

      The law did not require radio wireless operators on duty at all times.

    • D. 

      The law failed to require sufficient safety jackets and boats.

    • E. 

      The law did not pertain to waters far off coast in the North Atlantic.

  • 8. 
    Two radio cases, Hoover v. Intercity Radio and U.S. v. Zenith (WJAZ), underscored what deficiency in federal law with respect to radio  operations?  
    • A. 

      U.S. Commerce Department had not authority to deny licenses to applicants.

    • B. 

      Congress could not delegate a private business to serve as a public trustee.

    • C. 

      Pirate wireless transmitters were completely legal under federal law.

    • D. 

      Military use of wireless had lower priority than commercial broadcasting.

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 9. 
    Congress sought to remedy deficits in U.S. law with respect to issuing, denying, and regulating broadcast licenses through what 1927 act? 
    • A. 

      Establishment of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

    • B. 

      Adoption of the fairness doctrine

    • C. 

      Oversight by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)

    • D. 

      Establishment of the Federal Radio Commission (FRC)

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 10. 
    Of all the infractions that could result in a sanction against a broadcast station, which one is the most serious and could result in the denial of a license renewal?  
    • A. 

      Obscene or indecent programming

    • B. 

      Soliciting money under false pretense

    • C. 

      Lack of candor (lying to the FCC)

    • D. 

      Promoting an illegal lottery

    • E. 

      Failure to provide a diversity of viewpoints

  • 11. 
    T/F: The size of an audience usually is more important than its characteristics.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    T/F: Broadcasters give all audience members equal weight in programming decisions
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    T/F: No modern media can escape the imperative to count and evaluate audiences.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
                       is a viewing log kept by a member of a selected household as part of the audience-measurement process.             
    • A. 

      Meter

    • B. 

      Log

    • C. 

      Diary

    • D. 

      Net Rating

  • 15. 
    A.C. Nielsen's dramatic contribution to audience measurement was called the                 .
    • A. 

      Arbitron

    • B. 

      Audimeter

    • C. 

      Portable People Meter (PPM)

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 16. 
    T/F: Audience measurement is open to challenge by its stakeholders.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
                          increase(s) pressure for high ratings.
    • A. 

      Internet usage

    • B. 

      Diaries

    • C. 

      Projections

    • D. 

      Industry Consolidation

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 18. 
    A                  is an electronic device that records the channel choices of viewers (and sometimes more.)
    • A. 

      Meter

    • B. 

      Diary

    • C. 

      Quota Sample

    • D. 

      Portable People Meter

  • 19. 
    Archibald Crossley pioneered radio ratings by first using                  .
    • A. 

      People Meters

    • B. 

      Local People Meters

    • C. 

      Random Sampling

    • D. 

      Quota Sampling

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 20. 
    Which of the following can measure TV viewers?
    • A. 

      HUT, HUR, PUT

    • B. 

      PUT, HUT, PIT

    • C. 

      HUT, PUR, PUT

    • D. 

      HUR, HUT, PUR

  • 21. 
    BOOK is another word for               .
    • A. 

      Ratings

    • B. 

      Sweeps

    • C. 

      Sampling

    • D. 

      Diaries

  • 22. 
    Since the mid-1990s, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting has used                ratings as a basis for granting funding to community and public radio.
    • A. 

      Audimeter

    • B. 

      Geodemographic

    • C. 

      Psychographic

    • D. 

      Nielsen's

    • E. 

      Arbitron

  • 23. 
    Which type of meter is designed to supplant the sweeps-and-diaries approach to acquiring local TV ratings? (Whenever a viewer prepares to watch TV, they need to enter a code, which shows which viewer was doing the watching.)
    • A. 

      Portable People Meters

    • B. 

      Diaries

    • C. 

      Local People Meters

    • D. 

      Net ratings

  • 24. 
    Which type of meter is aimed at capturing data from people listening/watching outside the house? (Hears and senses whatever show the user is watching or hearing and identifies it through codes)
    • A. 

      Local People Meters

    • B. 

      Quota Sampling

    • C. 

      Active Meters

    • D. 

      Portable People Meters

  • 25. 
    In demographic and psychographic research, what defines media users?
    • A. 

      Listening Patterns, Attention

    • B. 

      Greater Texture, Detail

    • C. 

      Income, Gender

    • D. 

      Detail, Attention

  • 26. 
    What was the unsuccessful 1990s effort by TV networks to design alternative ratings systems to Nielsen's called?
    • A. 

      SMART

    • B. 

      TargetTV

    • C. 

      Book

    • D. 

      Hooper

  • 27. 
    Why do broadcasters and advertisers still use ratings?
    • A. 

      Maybe nothing better has come along

    • B. 

      It is a basis for funding

    • C. 

      For advertising dollars

    • D. 

      None of the Above

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 28. 
    T/F: CPM stands for Cost Per Million
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 29. 
    What is the technique called where researchers call households DURING a program to see if they're watching/listening to it?
    • A. 

      Hooper

    • B. 

      SMART

    • C. 

      Coincidental

    • D. 

      Strip

    • E. 

      Audimeter

  • 30. 
    Which early ratings firm pioneered the use of coincidental telephone calls to determine listening patterns?
    • A. 

      Nielsen

    • B. 

      Swanson

    • C. 

      Hooper

    • D. 

      Drachkovitch

  • 31. 
    What kind of meter looks at channels and specific programs coming into the home? (Works with DVRs, too)
    • A. 

      Portable People Meters

    • B. 

      Local People Meters

    • C. 

      Active/Passive Meters

    • D. 

      All of the Above

  • 32. 
    What kind of ratings gauge the appeal of individual television performers?
    • A. 

      Meters

    • B. 

      TVQ or "Q"

    • C. 

      PUT/PUR

    • D. 

      Local People Meters

  • 33. 
                     is the measurement of an audience, usually as households. A single point equals 1 percent of all the households owning TV sets in the sample area.
    • A. 

      Share

    • B. 

      Rating

    • C. 

      Demographic

    • D. 

      Rating/Share

  • 34. 
                     is the percentage of all households currently using TV sets that is tuned into a particular channel.
    • A. 

      Rating/Share

    • B. 

      Demographic

    • C. 

      Rating

    • D. 

      Share

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 35. 
                             is a way of expressing a program's drawing power. Ex.) "The show did a 9/16 yesterday" means that the program was viewed in 9 percent of households owning TV sets and in 16 percent of households using TV sets at the time.
    • A. 

      Share

    • B. 

      Rating

    • C. 

      Rating/Share

    • D. 

      Share/Rating

  • 36. 
    What type of sampling studies a specified number of subjects of one type? Ex.) 10 teenage girls or 20 male retirees. Results are open to challenge as not valid across a population
    • A. 

      Random Sampling

    • B. 

      Projections

    • C. 

      Quota Sampling

    • D. 

      All of the Above

  • 37. 
    What type of sampling studies subjects drawn from a larger group, with each individual chosen by chance? Making results potentially valid all across that population.
    • A. 

      Random Sampling

    • B. 

      Quota Sampling

    • C. 

      Projections

    • D. 

      All of the Above

  • 38. 
    What early ratings service, created by and for radio advertisers, began trying in 1930 to measure the national audience?
    • A. 

      A.C. Nielsen

    • B. 

      Hooper

    • C. 

      Cooperative Analysis of Broadcasting (CAB)

    • D. 

      SMART

  • 39. 
    T/F: Projecting future ratings is an early step in the development of programming.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 40. 
    When is upfront commercial time shopped for? 
    • A. 

      Before the idea is pitched

    • B. 

      Before the new season begins

    • C. 

      After the new season begins

    • D. 

      After the primary ratings are in

  • 41. 
    The internet focused brand of Nielsen Media Research expands audience measurement and analysis. What is it called?
    • A. 

      A.C. Nielsen

    • B. 

      Neilsen Media Research

    • C. 

      Nielsen NetRatings

    • D. 

      Net

  • 42. 
    What led networks to remove most single-sponsored shows from their schedule?
    • A. 

      The practice of "clipping"

    • B. 

      The corruption of game shows

    • C. 

      The unfairness of competition

    • D. 

      The rise of multiple sponsorship dollars

  • 43. 
                     is a team where the combined talents of sales, marketing, planning, creativity and research must work in sync to achieve a goal.
    • A. 

      Enterprise

    • B. 

      Online advertising Agencies

    • C. 

      Advertising

    • D. 

      Marketing Agencies

  • 44. 
    Advertising begins with               .
    • A. 

      Account Executives

    • B. 

      Execution

    • C. 

      Creative Planning

    • D. 

      Marketing

  • 45. 
    Who is responsible for the planning and placement of advertising messages?
    • A. 

      Account Executives

    • B. 

      Account Planners

    • C. 

      Media Planners/Buyers

    • D. 

      Creative Team

  • 46. 
                      is A.C. Nielsen's term for one group of communities where the audience receives the same radio and television signals.
    • A. 

      Target Audience

    • B. 

      Reach

    • C. 

      Designated Market Area (DMA)

    • D. 

      Frequency

  • 47. 
    "Avails" stands for:
    • A. 

      Time slots in a schedule to be sold to advertisers

    • B. 

      Advertisements available for a program

    • C. 

      Time slots available for programming during prime time

    • D. 

      Available audience reach

  • 48. 
    What is the commercial schedule from beginning to end when the advertiser places commercials with a station or cable system called?
    • A. 

      Inventory

    • B. 

      Cume

    • C. 

      Flight

    • D. 

      Run of Schedule (ROS)

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 49. 
                    is the estimate of the percentage of the total audience exposed to a message, spot, or program at least once during its run.
    • A. 

      Reach

    • B. 

      Frequency

    • C. 

      Avails

    • D. 

      Flight

  • 50. 
                   is the measure of advertising reinforcement--usually an estimate of how many times the audience has been exposed to a spot.
    • A. 

      Reach

    • B. 

      Frequency

    • C. 

      Avails

    • D. 

      Flight

  • 51. 
    The flight of commercials where the TV station or cable system promises to run the spots in the highest-rated time period available is called what?
    • A. 

      Flight

    • B. 

      Best Time Available (BTA)

    • C. 

      Best Reach Available (BRA)

    • D. 

      Reach

  • 52. 
                          is a preemptible package of spots that can be moved wherever a station or system desires and is sold at lower rates.
    • A. 

      Single Program Sponsorship

    • B. 

      Flight

    • C. 

      Run of Schedule (ROS)

    • D. 

      Run of Spot (ROS)

  • 53. 
    The advertising charge for mating an impression on 1,000 members of the audience is called what?
    • A. 

      Cost Per Point (CPP)

    • B. 

      Cost Per Thousand (CPM)

  • 54. 
    The advertising charge for reaching an audience equivalent to 1 percent of the population is called what?
    • A. 

      Cost Per Point (CPP)

    • B. 

      Cost Per Thousand (CPM)

  • 55. 
    The cumulative, unduplicated total number of people who pay attention to a radio or TV station for at least five minutes over a period of time, usually a week, is called what?
    • A. 

      Reach

    • B. 

      Frequency

    • C. 

      Cume

    • D. 

      Avails

  • 56. 
    The total of all ratings points received for all spots over a specified period of time is called what?
    • A. 

      Gross Impressions (GI)

    • B. 

      Gross Rating Points (GRP)

    • C. 

      Cume

    • D. 

      Target Rating Points (TRP)

  • 57. 
                     is the deal for sponsors' products or services in exchange for advertising time.
    • A. 

      Barter/Trade-Out

    • B. 

      Compensation

    • C. 

      Cume

    • D. 

      Make Goods

  • 58. 
                   refers to the parallel trends of consolidation and fragmentation (more channels owned by fewer companies reaching smaller audiences.)
    • A. 

      Reach

    • B. 

      Trade-Out

    • C. 

      Cross Platform

    • D. 

      Co-Op Deals

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 59. 
                   is a deal that allows a manufacturer and its retailer to SHARE the cost of commercials.
    • A. 

      Barter

    • B. 

      Trade-Out

    • C. 

      Co-Op Deals

    • D. 

      Make good

  • 60. 
    Spots that are added or re-scheduled when a television station or network fails to air them properly or to deliver a CPM guaranteed to the sponsor called?
    • A. 

      Make-Goods

    • B. 

      Co-Ops

    • C. 

      Trade-Outs

    • D. 

      Cross Platforms

  • 61. 
    What is the strategy called where you differentiate a product's name and logo from other competing brands in the market?
    • A. 

      Branding/ Brand Imaging

    • B. 

      Unique Selling Proposition (USP)

    • C. 

      Make-good

    • D. 

      ROS

  • 62. 
    What does "PLC" stand for?
    • A. 

      Program Lean Commercials

    • B. 

      Placement Lucked Commercials

    • C. 

      Program Length Commercials

    • D. 

      Placement Length Commercials

  • 63. 
    Congress established the              to ensure fairness in competition, and was designed to eliminate "unfair and deceptive acts" of commerce. 
    • A. 

      FCC

    • B. 

      Fairness Doctrine

    • C. 

      FTC

    • D. 

      Account Management Teams

  • 64. 
    Which of the following is a principle of law that advertisers must follow?
    • A. 

      Be truthful and mot misleading

    • B. 

      Show evidence to back up its claims

    • C. 

      Be fair

    • D. 

      None of the above

    • E. 

      All of the above must be followed

  • 65. 
    The Wireless Ship Act of 1910:
    • A. 

      Requested a rule for radio communications on ocean steamers carrying 50 or more people

    • B. 

      Failed to say how many hours per day they operators had to stay at their posts

    • C. 

      Failure became present when "titanic" sank

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 66. 
    The Cases of Intercity and Zenity vs. Hoover proved what?
    • A. 

      Local Stations are the only true broadcasters

    • B. 

      The Government completely ruled the media

    • C. 

      The department cannot deny licenses

    • D. 

      All of the Above

  • 67. 
    Who is responsible for "consistent with the public interest, convenience, and necessity, make reasonable regulations governing the interference potential of devices...emitting radio frequency energy."
    • A. 

      FCC

    • B. 

      FTC

    • C. 

      FRC

    • D. 

      U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor

  • 68. 
    The FRC evolved to incorporate telephones, telegraphs, and all electronic media and became known as:
    • A. 

      The FCC

    • B. 

      The FTC

    • C. 

      The Commerce of Development

    • D. 

      A.C. Nielsen Group

  • 69. 
    The FCC is FIRST responsible for                     .
    • A. 

      Deregulation of past laws

    • B. 

      Administering and enforcing the laws passed on Capitol Hill

    • C. 

      Deregulating the laws passed on Capitol Hill

    • D. 

      All of the Above

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 70. 
    All commissioners of the FCC are sworn to serve           years.
    • A. 

      Two

    • B. 

      Three

    • C. 

      Four

    • D. 

      Five

    • E. 

      Six

  • 71. 
    What is the correct order of the rule-making process?
    • A. 

      NOI, R&O, NPRM

    • B. 

      R&O, NOI, NPRM

    • C. 

      NOI, NPRM, R&O

    • D. 

      None of the Above

  • 72. 
    The                is designed to create awareness of a legal problem or issue and to invite informed comments on how it should be resolved. The Federal Register is responsible for publishing it.
    • A. 

      R&O

    • B. 

      NOI

    • C. 

      NPRM

    • D. 

      ROI

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 73. 
    The                shows the FCC is planning to make or amend its rules and is inviting further comments.
    • A. 

      ROI

    • B. 

      R&O

    • C. 

      NOI

    • D. 

      NPRM

  • 74. 
    T/F: The scarcity of spectrum space limits broadcast frequencies and station licenses.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 75. 
    A part of the licensing process, a             is authorization by the FCC to build a broadcast facility or to make substantial changes in an existing one.
    • A. 

      Notice of Inquiry (NOI)

    • B. 

      Construction Permit (CP)

    • C. 

      Renewal Expectancy

    • D. 

      Report and Order (R&O)

  • 76. 
    T/F: The most rigorous challenge in trying to own a TV station is finding an available frequency.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 77. 
    New TV stations begin with a:
    • A. 

      License Renewal

    • B. 

      Construction Permit

    • C. 

      Renewal Expectancy

    • D. 

      Public Inspection File

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 78. 
    A construction permit (CP) confirms which of the following?
    • A. 

      Citizenship

    • B. 

      The quality of your character (non-convicted felons)

    • C. 

      The depth of your pockets (sufficient resources)

    • D. 

      It will confirm all of the above

  • 79. 
    Licenses are now held for terms of                years before renewal is required.
    • A. 

      Two

    • B. 

      Four

    • C. 

      Five

    • D. 

      Six

    • E. 

      Eight

  • 80. 
    T/F: The FCC almost never revokes a station license, and renews licenses about 98% of the time.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 81. 
    Under what circumstances can the FCC fine a station or revoke its license?
    • A. 

      Obscene/indecent language on the air

    • B. 

      Soliciting money under false pretenses

    • C. 

      Advertising illegal lotteries

    • D. 

      Other violations of the public trust

    • E. 

      All of the Above

  • 82. 
    T/F: License renewals can only be "okayed" for the long term.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 83. 
    T/F: Stations have been shrinking in size and growing in number.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 84. 
    The FCC placed its first cap on ownership of radio and TV stations in 1952 with the "             ."
    • A. 

      Section 315

    • B. 

      Rule of Conglomerates

    • C. 

      Rule of Five

    • D. 

      Rule of Sevens

    • E. 

      Rule of Diversity

  • 85. 
    The Congress settled on a      % limit to ownership in 2004.
    • A. 

      5%

    • B. 

      49%

    • C. 

      39%

    • D. 

      98%

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 86. 
    What finally abolished the idea of the "rule of seven?"
    • A. 

      The Telecommunications Act of 1996

    • B. 

      The attacks on the Roman Catholic Church in 1931

    • C. 

      The creation of the Federal Radio Commission

    • D. 

      None of the Above

  • 87. 
    The Telecommunications Act of 1996 placed an "all-you-can-own" rule for radio stations on a                   basis.
    • A. 

      Local

    • B. 

      National

    • C. 

      Personal

    • D. 

      Global

    • E. 

      All of the Above

  • 88. 
    Ownership of both radio and television stations in a single market is now limited by                            . 
    • A. 

      The total number of stations there

    • B. 

      It is not limited at all

    • C. 

      The Sliding Scale

    • D. 

      The number of markets in a designated area

  • 89. 
    For markets with 5 or fewer TV stations, the rule is only        TV station per owner.
    • A. 

      4

    • B. 

      5

    • C. 

      0

    • D. 

      1

    • E. 

      2

  • 90. 
    A single owner can hold licenses to a triopoly if:
    • A. 

      The market has less more than 15 stations and if only 1 of the 3 is rated among the bottom 3

    • B. 

      The market has more than 18 stations and if only 1 of the 3 is rated among the top 4

    • C. 

      1 of the 3 is not rated

    • D. 

      A single owner cannot hold licenses to a triopoly

  • 91. 
    Duopolies are only permitted if:
    • A. 

      The market is between 5 and 18 stations, if only 1 of the 2 is rated among the top 4.

    • B. 

      The market is fewer than 18 stations, if both are rated among the top 4

    • C. 

      The market is greater than 18 stations, if only 1 of the 2 is rated among the top 4.

    • D. 

      Duopolies are not permitted

  • 92. 
    What rule forbids partnerships between newspapers and broadcasters in the same city?
    • A. 

      Cross-Ownership rule

    • B. 

      Must-Carry Rule

    • C. 

      Section 315

    • D. 

      None of the Above

  • 93. 
    T/F: There are no limits to cross-ownership in markets with greater than nine stations.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 94. 
    T/F: There are no cross-ownership limits in markets with 4 to 8 stations.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 95. 
    Before 1978, the government granted                 of all broadcast licenses to minorities. Only 40 stations out of more than 8,500.
    • A. 

      89%

    • B. 

      1%

    • C. 

      1/2 of 1%

    • D. 

      7/8 of 1%

  • 96. 
    If you owned a broadcst of cable property and were willing to sell it to a female of minority, you would get a                    . 
    • A. 

      Boost in ratings

    • B. 

      Tax break

    • C. 

      Ticket from the FCC

    • D. 

      None of the Above

  • 97. 
    Congress passed the Cable Communication Policy Act in 1984 to set the ceiling for municipal franchise fees at          %
    • A. 

      10%

    • B. 

      5%

    • C. 

      .5%

    • D. 

      50%

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 98. 
    The 1992 Cable Act put a cap on local cable rates, and ordered every system with       channels or more to set aside at least        channels for lease to outside parties.
    • A. 

      18, 3

    • B. 

      .5, 3

    • C. 

      3, 15

    • D. 

      36, 3

    • E. 

      18, 6

  • 99. 
    What rules require broadcast stations to be carried on cable, satellite or other subscription video services?
    • A. 

      Rule-Making Process

    • B. 

      1992 Cable Acts

    • C. 

      Cross-Ownership

    • D. 

      Must-Carry Rules

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 100. 
                        states that stations shall have no power of censorship over the material broadcast. It also prompts a number of FAQs
    • A. 

      Wireless Ship Act of 1910

    • B. 

      Section 315

    • C. 

      Cross Ownership Rules

    • D. 

      Cable Act of 1992.

    • E. 

      None of the Above

  • 101. 
    Why do we need research?
    • A. 

      How much money to charge advertisers

    • B. 

      Programming decisions

    • C. 

      Talent, Format, Design

    • D. 

      Know your audience AND your competitor's

    • E. 

      All of the Above

  • 102. 
    T/F: Ratings are a matter of public record.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 103. 
    T/F: Ratings are used to "rate" programs.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False