Rica Practice Quiz 1 Section B

15 Questions

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Rica Practice Quiz 1 Section B

This is a smaller version of the 70 question quiz. It is broken down into 15 question chunks to make study time more productive.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In a May assessment of a kindergarten student's performance, the teacher notes that the student is able to name the letters of the alphabet and has mastered print concepts.  However, the student is unable to identify rhyming words.  What should the teacher conclude about this student?
    • A. 

      The student has completed most of the requirements of kindergarten and will be successful in first-grade reading.

    • B. 

      The student has not mastered a phonemic awareness skill (that is, rhyming words) that should be mastered by the end of kindergarten.

    • C. 

      The student will not be able to perform at grade level in first grade.

    • D. 

      The student needs direct instruction and practice in phonemic letter recognition skills.

  • 2. 
    After completing his entry-level reading assessments, a fifth-grade teacher notes that one of his students, Maya, reads 80 WCPM (Words Correct Per Minute).  Which of the following strategies would the teacher be least likely to use when planning his next steps?
    • A. 

      Analyze Maya's reading to see whether she has been focusing her attention on decoding the words and perhaps needs to read lower-level material.

    • B. 

      Work to develop automaticity so Maya can translate letters into sounds effortlessly and accurately.

    • C. 

      Record WCPM and then begin systematic instruction in phonological awareness and word attack skills.

    • D. 

      Directly teach and model appropriate prosodic features.

  • 3. 
    When evaluating a student's reading, a primary teacher notes that when reading text orally, the student continually omits the silent e and reads: hat for hate                       tap for tape            cop for cope What are the instructional implications of this behavior?
    • A. 

      The Student is performing poorly in spelling, and the teacher needs to focus on teaching silent e endings to the student.

    • B. 

      The teacher needs to focus the student's attention on making sense of what she is reading.

    • C. 

      The teacher needs to have the student reread the passage to clarify meaning.

    • D. 

      The student would benefit from more explicit skills instruction with attention to vowel sounds.

  • 4. 
    According to the California Language Arts Framework, many learning difficulties can be corrected during Universal Access time.  Which strategy is not included?
    • A. 

      Good diagnostic teaching

    • B. 

      Repetition of instruction with lots of opportunities for student practice

    • C. 

      A focus on key skills and understanding

    • D. 

      A referral to the Student Success Team

  • 5. 
    According to the California Language Arts Framework, to plan appropriate intervention strategies to help students who are experiencing learning difficulties, teachers should consider the degree of severity according to the three major groups:
    • A. 

      Benchmark, strategic and intensive

    • B. 

      Advanced, intensive and strategic

    • C. 

      English Learner and English Only

    • D. 

      Low, middle, and high

  • 6. 
    A third-grade student is confusing consonant pairs when writing in her daily journal.  She writes JUNCL for jungle, EFRYONE for everyone, and CARROD for carrot.  Which is an appropriate instructional strategy to use with this student?
    • A. 

      The teacher should assign related workbook pages from their reading series to help this student overcome these errors.

    • B. 

      The student would benefit from worthwhile practice in sound blending to make meaning of words.

    • C. 

      The teacher needs to instruct the student in articulating phonemes

    • D. 

      The student needs to add similar words to her spelling lists and study them.

  • 7. 
    During Daily writing, a third-grade student continually confuses long vowel sounds and writes hiev for hive, bote for boat, and trea for tree. The instructional strategies the teacher should use to meet this student's identified need include which of the following?
    • A. 

      Increasing independent reading, assigning additional homework with long vowel sounds, and making frequent assessments.

    • B. 

      Providing crossword puzzles and word hunts and encourage independent reading, so the student can encounter similar vocabulary.

    • C. 

      Developing weekly spelling words using the look-see-say method; sorting pictures; and adding vocabulary hunts.

    • D. 

      Direct instruction in long vowel patterns, word sorts, and the use of word study notebooks and other activities to practice vowel patterns.

  • 8. 
    A fourth-grade teacher is working on syllabication with her class.  When she says "misunderstanding," her students clap on the syllables and segment the word into mis-un-der-stand-ing.  Next, she says "hospitality" and asks students to clap on the syllables and segment the word into hos-pi-tal-i-ty.  Later, during a writing assignment, she encourages students to softly clap on syllables before writing difficult words.  Which is the best reason for students to practice segmenting words?
    • A. 

      Syllabication will increase their ability to encode the first 100 high-frequency words.

    • B. 

      The ability to break words into syllables will have an impact on their spelling accuracy with multisyllabic words.

    • C. 

      Syllabication helps students connect new words to existing words in their oral vocabularies

    • D. 

      Awareness of syllabication and word origin is necessary for students to become proficient readers.

  • 9. 
    What are the instructional implications regarding a primary student who reads the word yell as will?
    • A. 

      The student needs added practice with letters and blending sounds into words.

    • B. 

      Some examples of activities that would benefit the student are picture sorts and spelling puzzles.

    • C. 

      Maintenance of critical word skills is imperative to this student's progress.

    • D. 

      The ability to distinguish between letters and sounds is apparent, and the child should be moved to the next level.

  • 10. 
    Fifth-grade students are studying traditional literature.  As part of the fables genre, students will perform a Reader's Theatre version of "Androcles and the Lion" for a second-grade class.  This type of activity helps teachers informally gather data about the fifth-grade students' ability to: 
    • A. 

      Change the way they speak to fit main character traits while reading and developing automaticity at an independent level.

    • B. 

      Develop listening skills in younger students.

    • C. 

      Learn roles and read lines with fluency and expression.

    • D. 

      Work with younger students while performing literary analysis.

  • 11. 
    Some effective ways to teach letter recognition to kindergarten students include the use of:
    • A. 

      A pocket chart, reciting nursery rhymes, and singing songs.

    • B. 

      Magnetic letter sorts, creating alphabet books, and calling students' attention to individual letters that the teacher writes in a morning message.

    • C. 

      Clapping syllables, word segmentation, and blending.

    • D. 

      Alphabet-sound charts, sound boxes, and the modeling of stretching words when writing.

  • 12. 
    A teacher prepares a lesson using a series of boxes that correspond to the number of sounds that are heard in a word.  For example, a kindergarten teacher provides her students with the following boxes along with round plastic markers.  Next, the teacher pronounces the word c-a-t slowly, stretching the word into its sounds.  Finally, she asks the students in her reading group to move their plastic markers into the boxes as she says the sounds in the word.  Why is this lesson effective for these students?
    • A. 

      These students are learning to segment the sounds in a word that is spoken.

    • B. 

      These students are "playing with language," which research has shown is an essential precursor to reading.

    • C. 

      The teacher is guiding these students in an activity that develops their oral language and has proven to be an indicator of early reading success.

    • D. 

      The teacher understands that similar activities help students to develop an interest in language and how it works and will help them develop into proficient readers.

  • 13. 
    Which of the following strategies is the most effective in teaching spelling to children?
    • A. 

      Memorizing lists of words that are related to reading material introduced at the beginning of each theme.

    • B. 

      Studying spelling patterns such as those found in CVCC, CCVC, and CVVC words.

    • C. 

      Taking a spelling test every week.

    • D. 

      Developing alphabetic principals and using phonemic analysis by spelling words aloud.

  • 14. 
    A fourth-grade teacher is working with Tony, a student who is trying to decode the word "upsetting".  Read the following dialog and use it to answer the question about their conversation. Teacher: Can you read this word? Student: Yes.  It's uspsing. Teacher: Does upsing make sense? Student: No I guess not.  Teacher: You've read part of the word.  Try again. Student: Oh!  It's upping. Teacher: You've read the first syllable and the last syllable.  Now I want you to focus on the middle part of the word.  Can you try the word again? Student: Up-set-ting. Teacher: You just read all of the syllables in the word.  Try to put them together quickly to read the word. Student: Upsetting, upsetting.  I got it.  The word is upsetting! Teacher: Great job! You figured out the word upsetting. Based on the preceding conversation, this student would most clearly benefit from:
    • A. 

      Participating in a systematic, organized phonics program.

    • B. 

      Paying attention to structure and syntactic cues.

    • C. 

      Explicit instruction and guided practice decoding multi-syllabic words.

    • D. 

      Systematic instruction in decoding prefixes and suffixes.

  • 15. 
    Alan is a fourth grader who reads at grade level.  When asked to choose a book from the classroom library, he generally selects texts that are at his frustration level.  It is clear that he is unable to read his chosen material.  The teacher's best response to this behavior would be to:
    • A. 

      Choose easier material for Alan so he is able to accurately decode and comprehend the text.

    • B. 

      Continue allowing Alan to select books at his frustration level for as long as he appears to be enjoying his choices.

    • C. 

      Teach Alan the five-finger rule of reading so he will be able to monitor his own reading selections. When Alan makes more than five errors per page, he will know the book is too difficult for him and choose another.

    • D. 

      Review Alan's book selections during Guided Reading and give mini-lesson on difficult reading concepts so Alan will be able to read at his instructional level.