Interior Design Quiz: Types Of Rhythm

7 Questions | Total Attempts: 882

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Interior Design Quiz: Types Of Rhythm

Below is an Interior Design Quiz on Types of Rhythm. An interior designer has been known to use different objects or colors to give the illusion of movement in a space and this is one of the basic skills they are taught. How well do you understand the different types of rhythm and how to achieve them? Take up this quiz to find out!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is rhythm?
    • A. 

      Two or more different motifs may be changing, such as the black and red squares in a checkerboard; a single motif might be flipped, mirrored or rotated every so many iterations; or the placement or spacing between motifs can be changed. This is essentially a regular rhythm that has more complex motifs, or meta-motifs.

    • B. 

      A visual tempo or beat that is also called movement. It is when motifs or elements are repeated, alternated, or otherwise arranged. The intervals between them or how they overlap can create a sense of movement.

    • C. 

      Groupings of similar motifs or elements that repeat with no regularity

    • D. 

      Created by a series of elements, often identical or similar, that are placed at regular or similar intervals, such as in grids. Same visual beat and amount of space is used.

  • 2. 
    What is regular rhythm?
    • A. 

      Created by a series of elements, often identical or similar, that are placed at constant or similar intervals, such as in grids. These rhythms, if overused, can be monotonous. The same visual beats and amount of space is used.

    • B. 

      Two or more different motifs may be alternated, such as the black and red squares in a checkerboard; a single motif might be flipped, mirrored or rotated every so many iterations; or the placement or spacing between motifs can be alternated. This is essentially a regular rhythm that has more complex motifs, or meta-motifs.

    • C. 

      Created by undulating elements and intervals, bending and curving motifs and spaces. It can naturally be seen in streams and waterways, beaches and waves, sand dunes and glaciers, rolling hills and wind-blown grasses.

    • D. 

      Each time a motif repeats it changes a little, transforming and translating in a steady sequence - the motif progresses from one thing to another.

  • 3. 
    What is alternating rhythm?
    • A. 

      Created by a series of elements, often identical or similar, that are placed at constant or similar intervals, such as in grids.

    • B. 

      Groupings of similar motifs or elements that repeat with no regularity.

    • C. 

      Two or more different motifs may be changing, such as the black and red squares in a checkerboard; a single motif might be flipped, mirrored or rotated every so many iterations; or the placement or spacing between motifs can be changing. Essentially a regular rhythm that has more complex motifs, or meta-motifs. The added variety can help lessen the monotony.

    • D. 

      Created by undulating elements and intervals, bending and curving motifs and spaces

  • 4. 
    What is random rhythm? 
    • A. 

      Groupings of similar motifs or elements that repeat with no regularity. Examples are pebble beaches, the fall of snow, fields of clover, herds of cattle, and traffic jams.

    • B. 

      Each time a motif repeats it changes a little, transforming and translating in a steady sequence - the motif progresses from one thing to another.

    • C. 

      Two or more different motifs may be alternated, such as the black and red squares in a checkerboard; a single motif might be flipped, mirrored or rotated every so many iterations; or the placement or spacing between motifs can be alternated.

    • D. 

      Created by undulating elements and intervals, bending and curving motifs and spaces

  • 5. 
    What is progressive/converging rhythm?
    • A. 

      Groupings of similar motifs or elements that repeat with no regularity

    • B. 

      Created by a series of elements, often identical or similar, that are placed at regular or similar intervals, such as in grids

    • C. 

      Created by undulating elements and intervals, bending and curving motifs and spaces

    • D. 

      Repetition of a shape that changes overtime its repeated. Each time a motif repeats it changes a little, transforming and translating in a steady sequence - the motif progresses from one thing to another.

  • 6. 
    What is flowing rhythm?
    • A. 

      Created by undulating elements and intervals, bending and curving motifs and spaces. It can be seen in streams and waterways, beaches and waves, sand dunes and glaciers, rolling hills and wind-blown grasses.

    • B. 

      Each time a motif repeats it changes a little, transforming and translating in a steady sequence - the motif progresses from one thing to another.

    • C. 

      Two or more different motifs may be alternated, such as the black and red squares in a checkerboard; a single motif might be flipped, mirrored or rotated every so many iterations; or the placement or spacing between motifs can be alternated.

    • D. 

      Created by a series of elements, often identical or similar, that are placed at constant or similar intervals, such as in grids

  • 7. 
    What is kinesthetic empathy?
    • A. 

      Repetition of a shape that changes overtime its repeated.

    • B. 

      When a visual experience actually stimulates one of our other senses.

    • C. 

      Created by repeated positive shapes separated by negative spaces.

    • D. 

      Occurs when the visual forces expand outward.

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