Test Quiz: Pharmacotherapy Of Arrhythmia

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| By Caitlinb
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Caitlinb
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Quizzes Created: 12 | Total Attempts: 9,079
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Heart Quizzes & Trivia

The heart is one of the major organs in the human body and its beating signifies whether or not it is not working as it should. If someone’s heartbeat becomes irregular it can be a sign Arrhythmia and may need to undergo pharmacotherapy. Do you wish to test your knowledge when it comes to pharmacotherapy of Arrhythmia? Take up this test and do that.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Purkinje fibers are a type of ________. Their depolarization is due to ________ influx.

    • A.

      Nonautomatic cell, calcium

    • B.

      Automatic cell, calcium

    • C.

      Nonautomatic cell, sodium

    • D.

      Automatic cell, sodium

    Correct Answer
    C. Nonautomatic cell, sodium
    Explanation
    Purkinje fibers are a type of nonautomatic cell, which means they do not have inherent automaticity and rely on external stimulation to depolarize. Their depolarization is due to sodium influx, as sodium ions enter the cell during the depolarization phase of the action potential.

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  • 2. 

    The most common form of abnormal impulse conduction is reentry where instead of traveling down the heart in a normal fashion, the impulse begins to go in a circular motion. These types of reentry circuits often occur in areas with _____________.

    • A.

      Atrial flutter

    • B.

      Scar tissue due to MI

    • C.

      Decreased sympathetic drive

    • D.

      Heart block

    • E.

      Lack of oxygen

    Correct Answer
    B. Scar tissue due to MI
    Explanation
    Reentry circuits commonly occur in areas with scar tissue due to MI. Scar tissue can disrupt the normal electrical pathways in the heart, creating a circuit that allows the impulse to travel in a circular motion instead of down the heart in a normal fashion. This can lead to abnormal impulse conduction and conditions such as atrial flutter. Scar tissue is a common consequence of myocardial infarction (MI), which is the death of heart muscle due to a blockage in the coronary arteries.

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  • 3. 

    In an automatic cell, there is a slow and gradual Phase 0 initiated by _______.

    • A.

      Sodium

    • B.

      Magnesium

    • C.

      Potassium

    • D.

      Calcium

    Correct Answer
    D. Calcium
    Explanation
    In an automatic cell, the slow and gradual Phase 0 is initiated by calcium. Calcium plays a crucial role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, including cardiac cells. During Phase 0, calcium ions enter the cell through voltage-gated calcium channels, leading to depolarization and the generation of an action potential. This influx of calcium triggers various cellular processes, including muscle contraction and neurotransmitter release. Therefore, calcium is essential for the proper functioning of automatic cells.

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  • 4. 

    The conduction time from the atria to the ventricles is the:

    • A.

      P wave

    • B.

      PR interval

    • C.

      QRS complex

    • D.

      T wave

    • E.

      QT interval

    Correct Answer
    B. PR interval
    Explanation
    The PR interval represents the time it takes for the electrical signal to travel from the atria to the ventricles in the heart. It includes the time it takes for the signal to travel through the AV node. Therefore, the PR interval is the correct answer for the conduction time from the atria to the ventricles.

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  • 5. 

    Ventricular depolarization and repolarization are the:

    • A.

      P wave

    • B.

      PR interval

    • C.

      QRS complex

    • D.

      T wave

    • E.

      QT interval

    Correct Answer
    E. QT interval
    Explanation
    The QT interval represents the time it takes for both ventricular depolarization and repolarization to occur. It begins at the start of the QRS complex, which represents ventricular depolarization, and ends at the end of the T wave, which represents ventricular repolarization. Therefore, the correct answer is the QT interval.

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  • 6. 

    PSVT, A-fib, and sinus Brady/tachycardia are types of:

    • A.

      Supraventricular arrhythmias

    • B.

      Ventricular arrhythmias

    • C.

      Conduction blocks

    Correct Answer
    A. Supraventricular arrhythmias
    Explanation
    PSVT (Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia), A-fib (Atrial Fibrillation), and sinus Brady/tachycardia (abnormal slow/fast heart rate originating from the sinus node) are all types of supraventricular arrhythmias. These arrhythmias occur in the atria or AV node, above the ventricles, and can result in irregular or abnormal heart rhythms. Ventricular arrhythmias, on the other hand, originate in the ventricles and include conditions like ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. Conduction blocks refer to abnormalities in the electrical conduction system of the heart, which can cause delays or interruptions in the normal heart rhythm.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the following are class IA drugs? (Check all that apply)

    • A.

      Quinidine

    • B.

      Lidocaine

    • C.

      Procainamide

    • D.

      Flecainide

    • E.

      Disopyramide

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Quinidine
    C. Procainamide
    E. Disopyramide
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Quinidine, Procainamide, and Disopyramide. Class IA drugs are a type of antiarrhythmic medication that work by blocking sodium channels in the heart, which helps to regulate the heart's rhythm. Quinidine, Procainamide, and Disopyramide all belong to this class of drugs and are commonly used to treat various types of arrhythmias. Lidocaine and Flecainide, on the other hand, belong to different classes of antiarrhythmic drugs and are not classified as class IA drugs.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following are class III agents?  (Select all that apply)

    • A.

      Amiodarone

    • B.

      Sotalol

    • C.

      Propafenone

    • D.

      Ibutilide

    • E.

      Flecainide

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Amiodarone
    B. Sotalol
    D. Ibutilide
    Explanation
    Amiodarone, Sotalol, and Ibutilide are all class III antiarrhythmic agents. Class III agents primarily work by blocking potassium channels, prolonging the action potential duration and refractory period of cardiac cells. This helps in preventing re-entry circuits and maintaining sinus rhythm. These drugs are commonly used to treat various types of arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and atrial flutter. Propafenone and Flecainide, on the other hand, belong to class Ic antiarrhythmic agents and work by blocking sodium channels.

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  • 9. 

    A young, healthy adult presents with atrial tachycardia that has an abrupt onset and termination. Her atrial rate is approximately 140 to 250 bpm. She feels an uneasy sensation in her chest, anxiety, and dizziness. For the next ten minutes, it feels like her heart is racing and skipping beats. She has no other symptoms. Following one episode that lasted for several hours, she is seen at the ER. What is her diagnosis?

    • A.

      A fib

    • B.

      Heart block

    • C.

      PSVT

    • D.

      Angina

    • E.

      Torsades

    Correct Answer
    C. PSVT
    Explanation
    The patient's presentation of abrupt onset and termination of atrial tachycardia with a heart rate of 140 to 250 bpm, along with symptoms of chest uneasiness, anxiety, and dizziness, is consistent with Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia (PSVT). PSVT is a type of arrhythmia characterized by rapid heart rates originating above the ventricles. It can cause palpitations, shortness of breath, and lightheadedness. The patient's lack of other symptoms and the absence of findings suggestive of other conditions such as atrial fibrillation or heart block support the diagnosis of PSVT.

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  • 10. 

    The ER physician wants to use a drug that slows conduction through the AV node, thus interrupting the reentry cycle and decreasing or slowing the ventricular rate. The drug of choice is ____________ given by IV push.

    • A.

      Verapamil

    • B.

      Sotalol

    • C.

      Lidocaine

    • D.

      Adenosine

    • E.

      Quinidine

    Correct Answer
    D. Adenosine
    Explanation
    Adenosine is the drug of choice for slowing conduction through the AV node and interrupting the reentry cycle. It is given by IV push because it has a very short half-life and needs to be administered rapidly to achieve its desired effect. Adenosine works by temporarily blocking the AV node, which can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with supraventricular tachycardia. Verapamil, Sotalol, Lidocaine, and Quinidine are not typically used for this purpose and do not have the same mechanism of action as Adenosine.

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  • 11. 

    Unfortunately, the patient had just downed a few Red Bulls and some Theophylline at a pill party (and due to the competitive antagonism by methylxanthines like caffeine and theophylline) the higher doses and repeat bolus doses of Adenosine did not work. We need to switch to an alternate drug such as...

    • A.

      Verapamil or a Beta Blocker

    • B.

      Verapamil or Lidocaine

    • C.

      Quinidine or a Beta Blocker

    • D.

      Quinidine or Lidocaine

    Correct Answer
    A. Verapamil or a Beta Blocker
    Explanation
    The patient's ingestion of Red Bulls and Theophylline, which are methylxanthines, can competitively antagonize the effects of Adenosine. This means that higher doses and repeat bolus doses of Adenosine will not be effective in this case. Therefore, an alternate drug such as Verapamil or a Beta Blocker should be used instead. These drugs can help in managing the patient's condition effectively.

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  • 12. 

    A patient presents with the most common arrhythmia. It is due to a chaotic rhythm with multiple ectopic foci in atria firing randomly and multiple reentrant loops. His atrial rate is 350-600 bpm and his ECG shows no identifiable p wave. He has recently fainted. He has hypertension and heart failure already. What is his diagnosis?

    • A.

      A fib

    • B.

      V fib

    • C.

      PSVT

    • D.

      Heart block

    Correct Answer
    A. A fib
    Explanation
    The patient's presentation of a chaotic rhythm with multiple ectopic foci in the atria firing randomly, along with a high atrial rate and the absence of an identifiable p wave on the ECG, suggests a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (A fib). This is further supported by the patient's history of hypertension and heart failure, which are common comorbidities associated with A fib.

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  • 13. 

    This patient is at an increased risk of thrombotic stroke.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    This patient is at an increased risk of thrombotic stroke because certain factors or conditions increase the likelihood of blood clot formation in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. These factors may include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. Additionally, a history of previous strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), as well as certain medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation, can also increase the risk of thrombotic stroke. Therefore, it is important for this patient to be aware of the increased risk and take appropriate measures to prevent stroke, such as managing their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and staying physically active.

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  • 14. 

    The physician tells you that she wants to slow the ventricular rate with AV nodal blocking drugs. What drugs are the best drugs to use in this Step 1 process?

    • A.

      Adenosine, digoxin, and beta blocker

    • B.

      Verapamil/diltiazem, beta blocker, and sotalol

    • C.

      Digoxin, beta blocker, and verapamil/diltiazem

    Correct Answer
    C. Digoxin, beta blocker, and verapamil/diltiazem
    Explanation
    The physician wants to slow the ventricular rate with AV nodal blocking drugs. Adenosine is not the best choice as it is a rapid-acting drug used for diagnosing and treating supraventricular tachycardia, not for long-term rate control. Sotalol is a class III antiarrhythmic drug used for maintaining sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation and flutter, not specifically for rate control. Therefore, the best drugs to use in this process are digoxin, a cardiac glycoside that slows the ventricular rate by increasing vagal tone, beta blockers that block the effects of sympathetic stimulation on the heart, and verapamil/diltiazem, calcium channel blockers that slow the conduction through the AV node.

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  • 15. 

    The nurse is wondering what Step 1 agent (digoxin, beta blocker, verapamil/diltiazem) would be the best choice for high sympathetic tone.

    • A.

      Digoxin

    • B.

      Beta blocker

    • C.

      Verapamil/diltizem

    Correct Answer
    B. Beta blocker
    Explanation
    A beta blocker would be the best choice for high sympathetic tone because it blocks the action of adrenaline and other stress hormones on the heart and blood vessels. This helps to reduce the heart rate and blood pressure, which can be elevated in individuals with high sympathetic tone. Digoxin is primarily used to treat heart failure and atrial fibrillation, while verapamil/diltiazem are calcium channel blockers that are more commonly used for conditions such as hypertension and angina. However, beta blockers specifically target the sympathetic nervous system, making them the most suitable choice in this scenario.

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  • 16. 

    What Step 1 drug is usually effective unless there is high sympathetic tone? It has a slow onset of action, may take relatively high doses, and caution must be used if the patient has renal failure.

    • A.

      Digoxin

    • B.

      Beta blocker

    • C.

      Verapamil/diltiazem

    Correct Answer
    A. Digoxin
    Explanation
    Digoxin is a Step 1 drug that is usually effective unless there is high sympathetic tone. It has a slow onset of action and may require relatively high doses. Caution must be exercised when administering digoxin to patients with renal failure. This explanation highlights the characteristics of digoxin that make it the correct answer, such as its effectiveness, slow onset of action, dosage requirements, and caution in renal failure patients.

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  • 17. 

    The nurse tried to give the patient adenosine. You informed him that adenosine has far too short of a half-life and instead recommended digoxin. You successfully slowed the ventricular rate with AV node blocker! Now you need to pharmacologically convert the patient to normal sinus rhythm. Which drugs do you choose?

    • A.

      Class IA and Class II

    • B.

      Class IA and Class III (ibutilide, dofetilide)

    • C.

      Class IA and Class IV

    Correct Answer
    B. Class IA and Class III (ibutilide, dofetilide)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Class IA and Class III (ibutilide, dofetilide). Class IA antiarrhythmic drugs (such as quinidine, procainamide) help to stabilize the cell membrane and prolong the action potential duration, which can be effective in converting the patient to normal sinus rhythm. Class III antiarrhythmic drugs (such as ibutilide, dofetilide) prolong the repolarization phase of the action potential, helping to restore normal sinus rhythm. Therefore, using both Class IA and Class III drugs can be an effective approach to pharmacologically convert the patient to normal sinus rhythm.

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  • 18. 

    The patient's daughter quickly darts through the ER door and tells you that the patient has been in A-fib for an unknown duration. What do you do?

    • A.

      Anticoagulate now

    • B.

      Cardiovert now

    Correct Answer
    A. Anticoagulate now
    Explanation
    In this scenario, the patient's daughter informs you that the patient has been in A-fib (atrial fibrillation) for an unknown duration. A-fib is a condition where the heart beats irregularly, increasing the risk of blood clots. Anticoagulating the patient immediately is important to prevent clot formation and reduce the risk of stroke or other complications. Cardioversion, which is the procedure to restore a normal heart rhythm, may be considered later, but anticoagulation takes priority in this situation.

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  • 19. 

    3 weeks pass. The patient has been successfully anticoagulated to prevent stroke as a result of the cardioversion procedure. You gave the patient a class IA or Class III agent (while monitoring the patient's QT interval because these drugs may cause Torsades). If cardioversion is successul you want to try to maintain normal sinus rhythm with what chronic antiarrhythmic drugs?

    • A.

      Amiodarone or quinidine

    • B.

      Amiodarone or sotalol

    • C.

      Sotalol and quinidine

    Correct Answer
    B. Amiodarone or sotalol
    Explanation
    The correct answer is amiodarone or sotalol. These drugs are commonly used as chronic antiarrhythmic medications to maintain normal sinus rhythm after a successful cardioversion procedure. Amiodarone is a class III agent that works by blocking potassium channels, prolonging the action potential duration and refractory period. Sotalol is also a class III agent that has both beta-blocking and potassium channel-blocking properties. Both drugs are effective in preventing the recurrence of atrial fibrillation or other arrhythmias, but they should be used with caution and their QT interval should be monitored as they may cause Torsades de Pointes.

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  • 20. 

    The patient walks into the pharmacy and said that he had read some really horrible things about amiodarone online. He wants to know which of the following are true about amiodarone: (select all that apply)

    • A.

      It can cause pulmonary toxicity

    • B.

      It can cause hepatoxicity

    • C.

      It has a half-life of 53 days (it distributes to organs and fat)

    • D.

      It can cause blue-gray skin discoloration/photosensitivity

    • E.

      It can cause hypo/hyperthyroidism (40% iodine by weight)

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. It can cause pulmonary toxicity
    B. It can cause hepatoxicity
    C. It has a half-life of 53 days (it distributes to organs and fat)
    D. It can cause blue-gray skin discoloration/photosensitivity
    E. It can cause hypo/hyperthyroidism (40% iodine by weight)
    Explanation
    Amiodarone is a medication used to treat certain types of irregular heartbeat. The given answer states that it can cause pulmonary toxicity, hepatoxicity, has a half-life of 53 days, can cause blue-gray skin discoloration/photosensitivity, and can cause hypo/hyperthyroidism. These statements are all true about amiodarone. Pulmonary toxicity and hepatoxicity are known side effects of the medication. Amiodarone has a long half-life of 53 days, meaning it stays in the body for a prolonged period of time. It can cause blue-gray skin discoloration and increased sensitivity to sunlight, leading to photosensitivity. Additionally, amiodarone contains 40% iodine by weight, which can affect thyroid function and potentially cause hypo/hyperthyroidism.

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  • 21. 

    You assured the patient that most of the side effects were not common, but he returns a few months later and tells you that his ophthalmologist found corneal microdeposits in his eye. What do you tell him?

    • A.

      That can happen but vision changes are rare

    • B.

      That's not from the amiodarone

    Correct Answer
    A. That can happen but vision changes are rare
    Explanation
    The correct answer suggests that while corneal microdeposits can occur as a side effect of the medication, they are rare. This means that it is possible for the patient to have experienced this side effect, but it is not a common occurrence. By providing this information, the healthcare provider acknowledges the patient's experience while also reassuring them that it is not a common or expected side effect of the medication.

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  • 22. 

    The patient said his doctor warned him that amiodarone can increase digoxin serum levels by 70% but it also doubles the effects of another medication. What medication?

    Correct Answer
    WARFARIN
    warfarin
    Warfarin
    Coumadin
    coumadin
    Explanation
    The correct answer is warfarin. Warfarin is a medication used as an anticoagulant to prevent blood clots. Amiodarone can increase the levels of warfarin in the bloodstream, which can lead to an increased risk of bleeding. Therefore, it is important for patients taking both medications to be closely monitored for any signs of bleeding or changes in their INR (International Normalized Ratio) levels.

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  • 23. 

    Which indicates a CHADS2 scoring of 2 points (making the patient high risk). (Select all that apply.)

    • A.

      Prior stroke

    • B.

      Diabetes

    • C.

      Hypertension

    • D.

      TIA

    • E.

      Systemic embolism

    Correct Answer(s)
    A. Prior stroke
    D. TIA
    E. Systemic embolism
    Explanation
    The CHADS2 scoring system is used to assess the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Each factor in the scoring system is assigned a certain number of points, and a higher score indicates a higher risk of stroke. In this case, the factors that indicate a CHADS2 scoring of 2 points are prior stroke, TIA (transient ischemic attack), and systemic embolism. These factors suggest a history of cerebrovascular events, which increases the risk of future strokes. Therefore, the patient is considered high risk for stroke based on these factors.

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  • 24. 

    Age 75 years or older, history of HTN, history of HF or LVD, and diabetes all score 1 point with CHADS2 scoring?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The CHADS2 scoring system is used to assess the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this system, points are assigned to various risk factors. Age 75 years or older, history of hypertension (HTN), history of heart failure (HF) or left ventricular dysfunction (LVD), and diabetes all score 1 point. Therefore, the statement that these factors score 1 point with CHADS2 scoring is true.

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  • 25. 

    A 65-year old Afib patient with diabetes presents to the doctor's office.  According to CHADS2 should she receive anticoagulation therapy or antiplatelet therapy?

    • A.

      No

    • B.

      Yes, warfarin

    • C.

      Yes, aspirin

    • D.

      Yes, warfarin or aspirin

    Correct Answer
    D. Yes, warfarin or aspirin
    Explanation
    According to the CHADS2 scoring system, which is used to assess the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib), this 65-year-old patient with diabetes would have a score of 2. Based on the CHADS2 score, a score of 2 or higher indicates a high risk for stroke, and anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is recommended. However, in some cases, especially when the risk of bleeding is high, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin may be considered as an alternative. Therefore, the correct answer is "Yes, warfarin or aspirin."

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  • 26. 

    A patient presents to the pharmacy asking you about premature beats. You tell her that we all have isolated premature beats, they are usually short-lived, and we don't do anything about them. She tells you that her VPCs last for several minutes, she has at least 3 or more VPCs in a row, and her heartbeat is greater than 100 bpm. She feels lightheaded. You tell her to call her doctor because she probably has V-Tach and is at risk for sudden cardiac death. Her options for treatment are an automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator and several different drugs. What is the drug of choice?

    • A.

      Lidocaine

    • B.

      Propafenone

    • C.

      Digoxin

    • D.

      Sotalol

    • E.

      Amiodarone

    Correct Answer
    E. Amiodarone
    Explanation
    Based on the given information, the patient is experiencing ventricular tachycardia (V-Tach), which is a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia. The drug of choice for treating V-Tach is amiodarone. Amiodarone is a class III antiarrhythmic medication that is effective in converting and preventing V-Tach. It has a broad spectrum of activity and is considered to be the most effective antiarrhythmic drug for ventricular arrhythmias. Lidocaine, propafenone, digoxin, and sotalol are not the drugs of choice for treating V-Tach.

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  • 27. 

    What drug has a common side effect of diarrhea?

    Correct Answer
    Quinidine
    quinidine
    QUINIDINE
    Explanation
    Quinidine is a drug that is commonly associated with the side effect of diarrhea. This side effect occurs when the drug affects the gastrointestinal system, leading to loose or watery stools. It is important to note that the repeated mention of "quinidine" in different case formats (upper case, lower case) does not change the fact that it is the correct answer.

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  • 28. 

    A patient tells you that he is having ringing in his ears. Which drug that he is currently taking is likely to cause this?

    • A.

      Procainamide

    • B.

      Digoxin

    • C.

      Mexiletine

    • D.

      Quinidine

    • E.

      Amiodarone

    Correct Answer
    D. Quinidine
    Explanation
    Quinidine is a medication used to treat abnormal heart rhythms. One of its known side effects is tinnitus, which is a condition characterized by ringing in the ears. Therefore, if a patient is experiencing ringing in their ears, it is likely that quinidine, among the listed drugs, is causing this symptom.

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  • 29. 

    Which drug may cause lupus?

    • A.

      Quinidine

    • B.

      Procainamide

    • C.

      Amiodarone

    Correct Answer
    B. Procainamide
    Explanation
    Procainamide is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as antiarrhythmics. It is commonly used to treat irregular heart rhythms. However, one of the known side effects of procainamide is drug-induced lupus. Drug-induced lupus is a condition where certain medications can cause symptoms similar to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease. This includes symptoms such as joint pain, fever, rash, and fatigue. While other medications like quinidine and amiodarone may have their own side effects, procainamide is specifically associated with drug-induced lupus.

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  • 30. 

    Which drug causes nausea that may be minimized by taking it with food to delay gastric emptying and slow absorption rate? Key drug interactions are CYP450 enzyme inhibitors or inducers.

    • A.

      Amiodarone

    • B.

      Digoxin

    • C.

      Quinidine

    • D.

      Mexiletine

    Correct Answer
    D. Mexiletine
    Explanation
    Mexiletine is the correct answer because it is known to cause nausea, which can be reduced by taking it with food. Additionally, Mexiletine is metabolized by CYP450 enzymes, so drug interactions with CYP450 enzyme inhibitors or inducers can affect its absorption rate and metabolism.

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  • 31. 

    Class IA and Class III drugs may cause Torsades.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Class IA and Class III drugs are known to have a potential side effect of causing Torsades de Pointes, a specific type of irregular heartbeat. Torsades de Pointes is a potentially life-threatening condition that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest. Class IA drugs, such as quinidine and procainamide, and Class III drugs, such as amiodarone and sotalol, have been associated with an increased risk of Torsades de Pointes. Therefore, the statement "Class IA and Class III drugs may cause Torsades" is true.

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  • 32. 

    Which drug has a half-life of 53 days, and also has alpha, beta, and calcium channel blocking activity?

    • A.

      Amiodarone

    • B.

      Digoxin

    • C.

      Quinidine

    • D.

      Procainamide

    Correct Answer
    A. Amiodarone
    Explanation
    Amiodarone is the correct answer because it has a half-life of 53 days, which is significantly longer than the other drugs listed. Additionally, Amiodarone is known to have alpha, beta, and calcium channel blocking activity, making it a suitable option for treating certain heart rhythm disorders. Digoxin, Quinidine, and Procainamide do not have the same combination of characteristics as Amiodarone.

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  • 33. 

    Quinidine doubles digoxin serum levels, but __________ increases digoxin levels by 70%.

    Correct Answer
    amiodarone
    AMIODARONE
    Amiodarone
    Explanation
    Amiodarone is the correct answer because it increases digoxin levels by 70%. This means that when amiodarone is taken with digoxin, the levels of digoxin in the bloodstream will increase by 70%. This information suggests that amiodarone has a significant impact on the metabolism or elimination of digoxin, leading to higher levels of the drug in the body.

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  • 34. 

    Verapamil/Diltiazem is useful for supraventricular arrhythmias only.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Verapamil and Diltiazem are calcium channel blockers that are commonly used to treat supraventricular arrhythmias. These medications work by slowing down the electrical conduction in the heart, specifically in the atrioventricular (AV) node. By doing so, they can effectively control and prevent supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. However, they are not typically used for ventricular arrhythmias or other types of cardiac rhythm disturbances. Therefore, the statement "Verapamil/Diltiazem is useful for supraventricular arrhythmias only" is true.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 02, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Caitlinb
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