Perception MCQs Quiz

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Perception MCQs Quiz - Quiz

Perception is a state of mind that makes someone takes a point of understanding of a situation. Sometimes, the very first experience may either create the correct perception or the wrong one. Find it all below. Take this super interesting "Perception MCQs Quiz" to test your knowledge about it!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following words does NOT describe perception?

    • A.

      A passive process

    • B.

      A psychological process

    • C.

      No direct contact with the physical world

    • D.

      Using sense organs

    Correct Answer
    A. A passive process
    Explanation
    A camera is passive but perception is an ACTIVE process of making sense of the world rather than just passively capturing it. However the underlying neurology is so sophisticated it feels like a passive process

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  • 2. 

    What percentage of the cortex are visual brain areas?

    • A.

      50%

    • B.

      10%

    • C.

      30%

    • D.

      2%

    Correct Answer
    A. 50%
    Explanation
    around 30 areas and 100 billion cells

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  • 3. 

    Which of the sensory modalities is the most studied/understood?

    • A.

      Vision

    • B.

      Touch

    • C.

      Taste/Smell

    • D.

      They are all heavily studied

    Correct Answer
    A. Vision
    Explanation
    Vision is the most studied and understood sensory modality because it plays a crucial role in our daily lives. The human visual system is highly complex, and extensive research has been conducted to understand its mechanisms, including the structure and function of the eye, visual processing in the brain, and perception of visual stimuli. Additionally, vision is the primary sense through which we gather information about our environment, making it a subject of great interest in various fields such as psychology, neuroscience, and computer science.

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  • 4. 

    Psychophysics has a central concept of measuring the ... of sensory systems?

    • A.

      All of these

    • B.

      Detection limits

    • C.

      Discrimination limits

    • D.

      Thresholds

    Correct Answer
    A. All of these
    Explanation
    These are all measures of the limits of perception

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  • 5. 

    Measuring detection thresholds, a favored practice of Fechner, can be carried out by three methods; which of the following is NOT one of them?

    • A.

      Absolute method

    • B.

      Limit method

    • C.

      Adjustment method

    • D.

      Constant stimuli method

    Correct Answer
    A. Absolute method
    Explanation
    These three methods allow different ways of finding a participant's weakest stimulus that evokes a sensation

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  • 6. 

    What percentage of correct performance is necessary for psychophysical trials to determine a threshold of perception (discriminatory or detection)

    • A.

      75%

    • B.

      90%

    • C.

      50%

    • D.

      67%

    Correct Answer
    A. 75%
    Explanation
    In psychophysical trials to determine a threshold of perception, a percentage of correct performance is necessary. The correct answer in this case is 75%. This means that in order to accurately determine the threshold, participants need to correctly perceive or discriminate stimuli at a rate of 75% or higher. This level of accuracy ensures that the results are reliable and can be used to make conclusions about the perception threshold.

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  • 7. 

    During a psychophysical trial, the SAME stimulus strength will cause different answers from the same participant; what explains why our threshold detections are not discrete?

    • A.

      Signal detection theory

    • B.

      Noisy wiring theory

    • C.

      Stimulus discrimination theory

    • D.

      Judgement bias theory

    Correct Answer
    A. Signal detection theory
    Explanation
    Internal noise interferes with out perceptual decision hence thresholds are probabilistic and not absolute measures of performance (hence 75%)

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following is incorrect about neurophysiological single-cell recording in vision?

    • A.

      It is intracellular

    • B.

      It uses a microelectrode that is surgically placed into a visual system area of study

    • C.

      It records next to the axon of a cell to pick up action potentials from a specific cell

    • D.

      It is reductionist

    Correct Answer
    A. It is intracellular
    Explanation
    This technique has to record extracellularly, it is reductionist because measuring single cells tells us little about the combined activity of many neurones

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  • 9. 

    What type of graph is collected from a neurophysiological experiment of vision?

    • A.

      Histogram (PSTH)

    • B.

      Line graph (PSTLG)

    • C.

      Scatter graph (PSTSG)

    • D.

      Logarithm graph (PSTL)

    Correct Answer
    A. Histogram (PSTH)
    Explanation
    Peri-Stimulus-Time-Histogram - firing rate of a cell against time a stimulus is presented in its receptive field

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  • 10. 

    Thresholds can NOT be calculated from which of the following?

    • A.

      All of these can measure thresholds

    • B.

      Neurometric function (single cell)

    • C.

      Psychometric function (detection)

    • D.

      Psychometric function (discrimination)

    Correct Answer
    A. All of these can measure thresholds
    Explanation
    All of the given options can measure thresholds. A neurometric function (single cell) measures the response of a single neuron to different stimuli and can help determine the threshold at which the neuron responds. A psychometric function (detection) measures the ability of an individual to detect a stimulus at different levels of intensity, allowing the determination of the threshold. Similarly, a psychometric function (discrimination) measures the ability to discriminate between different stimuli at varying levels, helping to identify the threshold at which discrimination becomes possible. Therefore, all of these options can be used to calculate thresholds.

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  • 11. 

    Hubel and Wiesel (1959) showed monkeys a bar in various orientations and made what conclusion about neurons?

    • A.

      They act as feature detectors

    • B.

      Animal studies should not be applied to humans

    • C.

      Brain areas respond to different bar orientations

    • D.

      Receptive fields are crucial for object recognition

    Correct Answer
    A. They act as feature detectors
    Explanation
    Cells individually responded to different orientations, hence brain has to build up an image through this pattern like firing

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  • 12. 

    Of the functional imaging techniques, which one requires radioactive tagging?

    • A.

      PET

    • B.

      FMRI

    • C.

      EEG

    • D.

      MEG

    Correct Answer
    A. PET
    Explanation
    EEG - electrical activity but poor spatial RESOLUTION
    fMRI/PET - bloodflow but poor spatial ACCURACY

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  • 13. 

    Changes in luminance occurs at many different spatial scales, what change in luminance is responsible for FINE detail?

    • A.

      Abrupt (sharp) changes

    • B.

      Medium changes

    • C.

      Smooth changes

    • D.

      Course changes

    Correct Answer
    A. Abrupt (sharp) changes
    Explanation
    These would be represented by high SF sinusoidal gratings

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  • 14. 

    How does the brain represent the information in Visual images?

    • A.

      Sinusoidal gratings

    • B.

      Luminance changes

    • C.

      Wavelength changes

    • D.

      Pixel equivalents

    Correct Answer
    A. Sinusoidal gratings
    Explanation
    The brain represents information in visual images through sinusoidal gratings. Sinusoidal gratings are patterns made up of alternating light and dark bars that vary in spatial frequency. These patterns are commonly used in vision research to study visual perception and the brain's processing of visual information. The brain's visual system is sensitive to these gratings and can extract information about their orientation, spatial frequency, and phase. This allows the brain to encode and interpret visual images, contributing to our perception of the world around us.

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  • 15. 

    Which of the following best describes a sinusoidal grating?

    • A.

      Luminance varying across space

    • B.

      Luminance varying across time and space

    • C.

      Luminance varying across time

    • D.

      Luminance varying across 1 dimension

    Correct Answer
    A. Luminance varying across space
    Explanation
    A sinusoidal grating refers to a pattern where the luminance (brightness) of the image varies across space. It consists of a series of alternating light and dark bars that repeat in a sinusoidal manner. The variation in luminance occurs in the spatial dimension, meaning that the brightness changes as you move across the pattern. This type of grating is commonly used in vision research to study visual perception and sensitivity to spatial frequencies.

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  • 16. 

    There are 4 defining characteristics of Sinusoidal Gratings, which of the following is NOT one of them?

    • A.

      Position

    • B.

      Spatial Frequency

    • C.

      Orientation

    • D.

      Contrast

    Correct Answer
    A. Position
    Explanation
    Missing one = Spatial phase - which bar begins the grating (relative positioning)
    Contrast = intensity difference between the bars
    Orientation = axis of the grating's bar
    SF = number of bars in one grating (spatial scale of the luminance variation)

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  • 17. 

    What is the name for the process where by you decompose any image into its unique set of sinusoidal gratings?

    • A.

      Fourier Analysis

    • B.

      Fourier Synthesis

    • C.

      Fourier Disintegration

    • D.

      Fourier Dissolution

    Correct Answer
    A. Fourier Analysis
    Explanation
    Synthesis is the name for the opposite process

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  • 18. 

    What is the name for measuring the visual system's response to simple sinusoidal grating patterns?

    • A.

      Modulation transfer function

    • B.

      Spatial frequency function

    • C.

      Visual acuity function

    • D.

      Complex image function

    Correct Answer
    A. Modulation transfer function
    Explanation
    if we assume the MTF follows a strict set of rules then we predict exactly how the visual system will respond to all images made up of sinusoidal gratings

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  • 19. 

    The Contrast Sensitivity function shows ... ?

    • A.

      The entire visual system's sensitivity to gratings

    • B.

      A single cell's sensitivity to gratings

    • C.

      The entire visual system's sensitivity to contrast changes

    • D.

      A single cell's sensitivity to contrast changes

    Correct Answer
    A. The entire visual system's sensitivity to gratings
    Explanation
    It is a measure of the contrast we need to see specific spatial frequencies, a contrast detection threshold for sinusoidal gratings

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  • 20. 

    Which of the following is an explanation for why there is a drop off in sensitivity to high spatial frequency gratings in the human CSF?

    • A.

      Optical imperfections of the eye

    • B.

      Receptive fields of ganglion cells do not respond to gratings with too high spatial frequency

    • C.

      Both of these are correct

    • D.

      Both of these explain insensitivity to LOW spatial frequency gratings

    Correct Answer
    A. Optical imperfections of the eye
    Explanation
    The receptive fields of ganglion cells explains low sf grating insensitivity

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  • 21. 

    The human Contrast Sensitivity Function shows that humans are most sensitive to sinusoidal gratings with what spatial frequencies?

    • A.

      Mid-range

    • B.

      High

    • C.

      Low

    • D.

      High and Low

    Correct Answer
    A. Mid-range
    Explanation
    The greatest visibility is for sf's of 2-6, extreme high and low sf are invisible without very high contrast

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  • 22. 

    Under which luminance level does our system respond to the highest spatial frequencies?

    • A.

      Photopic

    • B.

      Mesopic

    • C.

      Scotopic

    • D.

      Lumopic

    Correct Answer
    A. Photopic
    Explanation
    Scotopic = night where are rods are active and we lose our fine detail - hence much lower sf gratings become the largest response

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  • 23. 

    When flickering gratings with a high temporal frequency are used then the CSF sensitivity to low spatial frequencies is drastically improved, what is suspected to be responsible for this?

    • A.

      Mangocellular cells are 10 times more sensitive

    • B.

      Parvocellular cells are 10 times more sensitive

    • C.

      Low spatial frequencies become higher when flickering

    • D.

      Higher spatial frequencies become lower when flickering

    Correct Answer
    A. Mangocellular cells are 10 times more sensitive
    Explanation
    proved through lesioning studies

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  • 24. 

    Optometrists use very high contrast stimuli to assess visual acuity in eye tests, which of the following is not a common eye test?

    • A.

      Grayson letter discrimination

    • B.

      Snellen eye chart

    • C.

      Landholt rings

    • D.

      Parallel bars

    Correct Answer
    A. Grayson letter discrimination
    Explanation
    this is what Snellen's test is

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  • 25. 

    What is visual acuity measuring on the CSF

    • A.

      The highest spatial frequency grating you can detect

    • B.

      The lowest spatial frequency grating you can detect

    • C.

      The limits of our spatial frequency grating detection

    • D.

      The complete range of the spatial frequency gratings we can detect

    Correct Answer
    A. The highest spatial frequency grating you can detect
    Explanation
    This is the point we require maximum contrast because our sensitivity is so low

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  • 26. 

    Which of these is an advantage of using CSF over Visual acuity tests to measure spatial visual function clinically?

    • A.

      It allows us to correctly predict how well pilots would see objects in fog (where fine detail is lost)

    • B.

      It is quick to administer

    • C.

      Most causes of loss of sensitivity are optical in nature meaning it reliably picks them up

    • D.

      It requires no specialist equipment

    Correct Answer
    A. It allows us to correctly predict how well pilots would see objects in fog (where fine detail is lost)
    Explanation
    CSF gives us a measure over the entire range of spatial scales and allows us to pick up losses of contrast too, a much more thorough measure but is essentially over the top for basic clinical needs

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  • 27. 

    Henning describes 4 basic taste qualities, which of the following is not one of the original 4?

    • A.

      Umami

    • B.

      Salty

    • C.

      Sour

    • D.

      Bitter

    Correct Answer
    A. Umami
    Explanation
    Umami is proposed as the 5th but the original 4th was sweet

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  • 28. 

    Which of the following is incorrect about the origin of the 4 taste components?

    • A.

      Salty - alkaline substances

    • B.

      Sour - acidic substances

    • C.

      Sweet - carbohydrates and amino acids

    • D.

      Bitter - alkaloids

    Correct Answer
    A. Salty - alkaline substances
    Explanation
    Salty comes from organic salts such as NaCl

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  • 29. 

    The average human has ... tastebuds?

    • A.

      10,000

    • B.

      1000

    • C.

      100,000

    • D.

      1,000,000

    Correct Answer
    A. 10,000
    Explanation
    The average human has 10,000 tastebuds. Tastebuds are small sensory organs on the tongue that allow us to taste different flavors. They are responsible for detecting sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami (savory) tastes. The number of tastebuds can vary from person to person, but on average, it is estimated that humans have around 10,000 tastebuds.

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  • 30. 

    What are the little bumps on the tongue that contain tastebuds?

    • A.

      Papillae

    • B.

      Foliate

    • C.

      Filoform

    • D.

      Fungiform

    Correct Answer
    A. Papillae
    Explanation
    Papillae are the little bumps on the tongue that contain tastebuds. These bumps are responsible for detecting different tastes such as sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. The tastebuds on the papillae send signals to the brain, allowing us to perceive and differentiate between different flavors.

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  • 31. 

    There are 3 sets of afferent nerve fibres that carry taste information from the taste buds to the brain, which of these is NOT one of them?

    • A.

      Circumpharyngeal

    • B.

      Chorda tympani

    • C.

      Glossopharyngeal

    • D.

      Vagus

    Correct Answer
    A. Circumpharyngeal
    Explanation
    Bit of a bitch question if this comes up

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  • 32. 

    Which brain area do taste afferent fibres not travel through?

    • A.

      Hippocampus

    • B.

      Brain stem

    • C.

      Thalamus

    • D.

      Parietal lobe

    Correct Answer
    A. Hippocampus
    Explanation
    Taste afferent fibers do not travel through the hippocampus. The hippocampus is primarily involved in memory formation and spatial navigation, rather than processing taste information. Taste afferent fibers travel from the taste buds on the tongue to the brain stem, where they synapse with other neurons before being relayed to the thalamus and then to the gustatory cortex in the parietal lobe for further processing and perception of taste.

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  • 33. 

    The degree of pleasantness a sensory (particularly taste) stimulus provides is likely mediated by afferent connections to which brain area?

    • A.

      Orbito-frontal cortex

    • B.

      Thalamus

    • C.

      Somatosensory cortex

    • D.

      Brain stem

    Correct Answer
    A. Orbito-frontal cortex
    Explanation
    The orbito-frontal cortex is responsible for processing sensory information related to taste and is involved in the subjective experience of pleasure or pleasantness. It receives afferent connections from taste receptors in the mouth and relays this information to other areas of the brain involved in decision-making and emotional processing. Therefore, the degree of pleasantness a sensory stimulus, particularly taste, provides is likely mediated by afferent connections to the orbito-frontal cortex.

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  • 34. 

    Cross-fibre theory suggests that ...

    • A.

      Most neurons responds to several taste stimuli but are tuned to a particular taste

    • B.

      Neurons are wired to one taste stimuli and integrate to build a taste repertoire

    • C.

      Neurons respond to all taste stimuli equally and the combined response of all the neurons separates out unique tastes

    • D.

      Neurons have a varying amount of 'preferred' tastes and the combination of these neurons with one, two, three or four preferred tastes builds a representation of the quality of the taste experienced

    Correct Answer
    A. Most neurons responds to several taste stimuli but are tuned to a particular taste
    Explanation
    The pattern of activity of neurons does code information about taste

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  • 35. 

    The front of the tongue is most sensitive to ...

    • A.

      Sweet and Bitter

    • B.

      Salty

    • C.

      Sour and Bitter

    • D.

      Sweet and Salty

    Correct Answer
    A. Sweet and Bitter
    Explanation
    The back side = SOUR (also the soft palate)
    front sides= SALTY

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  • 36. 

    What temperature correlates with the greatest taste sensitivity regardless of taste quality?

    • A.

      22-32 degrees

    • B.

      17-22 degrees

    • C.

      32-42 degrees

    • D.

      37 degrees exactly

    Correct Answer
    A. 22-32 degrees
    Explanation
    The temperature range of 22-32 degrees is associated with the greatest taste sensitivity regardless of taste quality. This means that our taste buds are most sensitive within this temperature range, allowing us to perceive and differentiate flavors more accurately. Temperatures outside of this range may affect our ability to fully experience and appreciate the nuances of different tastes.

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  • 37. 

    25% of the population have twice as many papillae than the 'non tasters' and experience taste very strongly, what are they called?

    • A.

      Supertasters

    • B.

      Extremetasters

    • C.

      Megatasters

    • D.

      OMGtasters

    Correct Answer
    A. Supertasters
    Explanation
    Supertasters are individuals who have a higher density of taste buds, specifically papillae, on their tongues. This increased number of taste buds allows them to experience taste sensations more intensely than the average person. Therefore, supertasters are the correct term to describe the individuals who make up 25% of the population and have twice as many papillae as non-tasters.

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  • 38. 

    Which of these is true about both smell and taste?

    • A.

      They are most likely encoded by cross fibre theory

    • B.

      There are an agreed set of qualities

    • C.

      There is a straightforward relationship between the sensation and the chemical properties

    • D.

      These are all true for both

    Correct Answer
    A. They are most likely encoded by cross fibre theory
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "They are most likely encoded by cross fibre theory." This means that both smell and taste are likely encoded by the cross-fiber theory, which suggests that different combinations of neurons firing in response to different stimuli create the perception of different smells and tastes. This theory suggests that there is not a one-to-one relationship between a specific chemical and a specific sensation, but rather a complex interaction of neural signals.

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  • 39. 

    Which of the following is not a destination for the afferent nerves from the olfactory bulb?

    • A.

      Brain stem

    • B.

      Olfactory cortex

    • C.

      Thalamus

    • D.

      Limbic system

    Correct Answer
    A. Brain stem
    Explanation
    The olfactory bulb is responsible for processing sensory information related to smell. Afferent nerves carry this information from the olfactory bulb to various destinations in the brain. The olfactory cortex, thalamus, and limbic system are all known destinations for the afferent nerves from the olfactory bulb. However, the brain stem is not a destination for these nerves. The brain stem is primarily involved in controlling basic functions such as breathing, heart rate, and consciousness, rather than processing sensory information.

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  • 40. 

    Which of the following does the sensation of touch have in common with all of the other sensory modalities?

    • A.

      Provides information about objects in the world that are in direct contact with us

    • B.

      Receptors distributed throughout the entire body

    • C.

      An extremely diverse response to different qualities and types of stimulation

    • D.

      All the sensory modalities share these properties

    Correct Answer
    A. Provides information about objects in the world that are in direct contact with us
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Provides information about objects in the world that are in direct contact with us." This is because the sensation of touch is unique in that it allows us to perceive and gather information about objects that are in direct physical contact with our body. This is different from other sensory modalities such as vision or hearing, which rely on different mechanisms to gather information about the external world.

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  • 41. 

    Which of the following is FALSE about human smell sensitivity?

    • A.

      Men are more sensitive to odours than women in general

    • B.

      Young adults are more sensitive to odours than the elderly

    • C.

      Up to 1 in 3 individuals suffer from a form of anosmia

    • D.

      Humans can detect some foul smelling compounds at 1 part per 50 billion

    Correct Answer
    A. Men are more sensitive to odours than women in general
    Explanation
    This statement is false because women generally have a better sense of smell compared to men. Studies have shown that women have more olfactory receptors and a larger olfactory bulb in the brain, which contributes to their heightened sense of smell. Men, on the other hand, tend to have a higher threshold for detecting certain odors. Therefore, it is incorrect to say that men are more sensitive to odors than women in general.

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  • 42. 

    There are 4 mechanoreceptors found in SMOOTH skin, which of the following is not found?

    • A.

      Basket cell

    • B.

      Pacinian Corpuscle

    • C.

      Merkel discs

    • D.

      Ruffini endings

    Correct Answer
    A. Basket cell
    Explanation
    The final one is Meissner corpuscle, basket cells are found in hairy skin

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  • 43. 

    How many mechanoreceptors are on the hairless skin of the hand?

    • A.

      17,000

    • B.

      44,000

    • C.

      122,000

    • D.

      5,500

    Correct Answer
    A. 17,000
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 17,000. Mechanoreceptors are sensory receptors that respond to mechanical pressure or distortion. The hand has a high density of mechanoreceptors, particularly in areas like the fingertips. These receptors play a crucial role in our sense of touch and allow us to perceive sensations such as pressure, texture, and vibration. The number of mechanoreceptors on the hairless skin of the hand is estimated to be around 17,000.

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  • 44. 

    Which of the following mechanoreceptors is a rapidly adapting fibre with a small receptor size that responds to fluttering vibrations?

    • A.

      Meissner corpuscle

    • B.

      Pacinian corpuscle

    • C.

      Ruffini ending

    • D.

      Merkel discs

    Correct Answer
    A. Meissner corpuscle
    Explanation
    The Meissner corpuscle is a rapidly adapting mechanoreceptor with a small receptor size that responds to fluttering vibrations. It is located in the skin and is particularly sensitive to light touch and low-frequency vibrations. The Pacinian corpuscle, Ruffini ending, and Merkel discs are also mechanoreceptors, but they have different characteristics and functions.

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  • 45. 

    Which of the following mechanoreceptors is a slow adapting fibre with a small receptive field size that responds to pressure sensations?

    • A.

      Merkel discs

    • B.

      Pacinian corpuscle

    • C.

      Meissner corpuscle

    • D.

      Ruffini ending

    Correct Answer
    A. Merkel discs
    Explanation
    Merkel discs are slow adapting fibers with a small receptive field size that respond to pressure sensations. These mechanoreceptors are located in the skin and are responsible for detecting fine details and textures. They play a crucial role in our ability to perceive pressure and touch sensations.

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  • 46. 

    Which of the mechanoreceptors is the most well studied?

    • A.

      Pacinian corpuscle

    • B.

      Merkel discs

    • C.

      Meissner corpuscle

    • D.

      Ruffini ending

    Correct Answer
    A. Pacinian corpuscle
    Explanation
    The Pacinian corpuscle is the most well-studied mechanoreceptor. This is because it is one of the largest and most easily identifiable mechanoreceptors in the body. It is found in various tissues and organs, including the skin, joints, and internal organs. The Pacinian corpuscle is responsible for detecting deep pressure and vibration, making it an important sensory receptor. Its structure and function have been extensively studied, leading to a better understanding of how mechanoreceptors work and contribute to our sense of touch.

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  • 47. 

    Pacinian corpusble is the ...

    • A.

      Largest mechanoreceptor

    • B.

      Most numerous mechanoreceptor

    • C.

      Most superficially located mechanoreceptor

    • D.

      All of these things

    Correct Answer
    A. Largest mechanoreceptor
    Explanation
    The Pacinian corpuscle is the largest mechanoreceptor in the body. Mechanoreceptors are sensory receptors that respond to mechanical stimuli such as pressure or vibration. The Pacinian corpuscle is found in the skin and other tissues and is responsible for detecting deep pressure and high-frequency vibrations. It has a large, onion-like structure that allows it to detect these stimuli effectively. Therefore, it is considered the largest mechanoreceptor in the body.

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  • 48. 

    To measure absolute thresholds for passive touch on the skin, what stimulus is deployed?

    • A.

      Nylon filament

    • B.

      Human fingertip

    • C.

      Fine hair

    • D.

      Silk

    Correct Answer
    A. Nylon filament
    Explanation
    Nylon filament is deployed to measure absolute thresholds for passive touch on the skin. This means that the nylon filament is used to determine the minimum amount of pressure or force required for a person to perceive the sensation of touch on their skin. It is a common tool used in sensory testing to assess tactile sensitivity and perception.

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  • 49. 

    Information about pain and temperature is carried by the ... ?

    • A.

      Spinothalamic tract

    • B.

      Dorsal side of the spinal cord

    • C.

      Contralateral tract

    • D.

      Substantia gelatinosa

    Correct Answer
    A. Spinothalamic tract
    Explanation
    The spinothalamic tract is responsible for carrying information about pain and temperature. It is a pathway that runs from the spinal cord to the thalamus in the brain, transmitting sensory information related to pain and temperature sensations. This tract allows us to perceive and respond to painful and hot/cold stimuli.

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  • 50. 

    Which of these words does NOT describe the fibres that carry touch information into the dorsal side of the spinal cord

    • A.

      Efferent

    • B.

      Large

    • C.

      Fast

    • D.

      Myelinated

    Correct Answer
    A. Efferent
    Explanation
    They are Afferent (towards the brain)

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Jan 05, 2017
    Quiz Created by
    Matt
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