Perception MCQs Quiz

122 Questions | Total Attempts: 7591

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Perception MCQs Quiz

Perception is a state of mind that makes someone takes a point of understanding of a situation. Sometimes, the very first experience may either create the correct perception or the wrong one. Find it all below. Take this super interesting "Perception MCQs Quiz" to test your knowledge about it!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of the following words does NOT describe perception?
    • A. 

      A passive process

    • B. 

      A psychological process

    • C. 

      No direct contact with the physical world

    • D. 

      Using sense organs

  • 2. 
    What percentage of the cortex are visual brain areas?
    • A. 

      50%

    • B. 

      10%

    • C. 

      30%

    • D. 

      2%

  • 3. 
    Which of the sensory modalities is the most studied/understood?
    • A. 

      Vision

    • B. 

      Touch

    • C. 

      Taste/Smell

    • D. 

      They are all heavily studied

  • 4. 
    Psychophysics has a central concept of measuring the ... of sensory systems?
    • A. 

      All of these

    • B. 

      Detection limits

    • C. 

      Discrimination limits

    • D. 

      Thresholds

  • 5. 
    Measuring detection thresholds, a favored practice of Fechner, can be carried out by three methods; which of the following is NOT one of them?
    • A. 

      Absolute method

    • B. 

      Limit method

    • C. 

      Adjustment method

    • D. 

      Constant stimuli method

  • 6. 
    What percentage of correct performance is necessary for psychophysical trials to determine a threshold of perception (discriminatory or detection)
    • A. 

      75%

    • B. 

      90%

    • C. 

      50%

    • D. 

      67%

  • 7. 
    During a psychophysical trial, the SAME stimulus strength will cause different answers from the same participant; what explains why our threshold detections are not discrete?
    • A. 

      Signal detection theory

    • B. 

      Noisy wiring theory

    • C. 

      Stimulus discrimination theory

    • D. 

      Judgement bias theory

  • 8. 
    Which of the following is incorrect about neurophysiological single-cell recording in vision?
    • A. 

      It is intracellular

    • B. 

      It uses a microelectrode that is surgically placed into a visual system area of study

    • C. 

      It records next to the axon of a cell to pick up action potentials from a specific cell

    • D. 

      It is reductionist

  • 9. 
    What type of graph is collected from a neurophysiological experiment of vision?
    • A. 

      Histogram (PSTH)

    • B. 

      Line graph (PSTLG)

    • C. 

      Scatter graph (PSTSG)

    • D. 

      Logarithm graph (PSTL)

  • 10. 
    Thresholds can NOT be calculated from which of the following?
    • A. 

      All of these can measure thresholds

    • B. 

      Neurometric function (single cell)

    • C. 

      Psychometric function (detection)

    • D. 

      Psychometric function (discrimination)

  • 11. 
    Hubel and Wiesel (1959) showed monkeys a bar in various orientations and made what conclusion about neurons?
    • A. 

      They act as feature detectors

    • B. 

      Animal studies should not be applied to humans

    • C. 

      Brain areas respond to different bar orientations

    • D. 

      Receptive fields are crucial for object recognition

  • 12. 
    Of the functional imaging techniques, which one requires radioactive tagging?
    • A. 

      PET

    • B. 

      FMRI

    • C. 

      EEG

    • D. 

      MEG

  • 13. 
    Changes in luminance occurs at many different spatial scales, what change in luminance is responsible for FINE detail?
    • A. 

      Abrupt (sharp) changes

    • B. 

      Medium changes

    • C. 

      Smooth changes

    • D. 

      Course changes

  • 14. 
    How does the brain represent the information in Visual images?
    • A. 

      Sinusoidal gratings

    • B. 

      Luminance changes

    • C. 

      Wavelength changes

    • D. 

      Pixel equivalents

  • 15. 
    Which of the following best describes a sinusoidal grating?
    • A. 

      Luminance varying across space

    • B. 

      Luminance varying across time and space

    • C. 

      Luminance varying across time

    • D. 

      Luminance varying across 1 dimension

  • 16. 
    There are 4 defining characteristics of Sinusoidal Gratings, which of the following is NOT one of them?
    • A. 

      Position

    • B. 

      Spatial Frequency

    • C. 

      Orientation

    • D. 

      Contrast

  • 17. 
    What is the name for the process where by you decompose any image into its unique set of sinusoidal gratings?
    • A. 

      Fourier Analysis

    • B. 

      Fourier Synthesis

    • C. 

      Fourier Disintegration

    • D. 

      Fourier Dissolution

  • 18. 
    What is the name for measuring the visual system's response to simple sinusoidal grating patterns?
    • A. 

      Modulation transfer function

    • B. 

      Spatial frequency function

    • C. 

      Visual acuity function

    • D. 

      Complex image function

  • 19. 
    The Contrast Sensitivity function shows ... ?
    • A. 

      The entire visual system's sensitivity to gratings

    • B. 

      A single cell's sensitivity to gratings

    • C. 

      The entire visual system's sensitivity to contrast changes

    • D. 

      A single cell's sensitivity to contrast changes

  • 20. 
    Which of the following is an explanation for why there is a drop off in sensitivity to high spatial frequency gratings in the human CSF?
    • A. 

      Optical imperfections of the eye

    • B. 

      Receptive fields of ganglion cells do not respond to gratings with too high spatial frequency

    • C. 

      Both of these are correct

    • D. 

      Both of these explain insensitivity to LOW spatial frequency gratings

  • 21. 
    The human Contrast Sensitivity Function shows that humans are most sensitive to sinusoidal gratings with what spatial frequencies?
    • A. 

      Mid-range

    • B. 

      High

    • C. 

      Low

    • D. 

      High and Low

  • 22. 
    Under which luminance level does our system respond to the highest spatial frequencies?
    • A. 

      Photopic

    • B. 

      Mesopic

    • C. 

      Scotopic

    • D. 

      Lumopic

  • 23. 
    When flickering gratings with a high temporal frequency are used then the CSF sensitivity to low spatial frequencies is drastically improved, what is suspected to be responsible for this?
    • A. 

      Mangocellular cells are 10 times more sensitive

    • B. 

      Parvocellular cells are 10 times more sensitive

    • C. 

      Low spatial frequencies become higher when flickering

    • D. 

      Higher spatial frequencies become lower when flickering

  • 24. 
    Optometrists use very high contrast stimuli to assess visual acuity in eye tests, which of the following is not a common eye test?
    • A. 

      Grayson letter discrimination

    • B. 

      Snellen eye chart

    • C. 

      Landholt rings

    • D. 

      Parallel bars

  • 25. 
    What is visual acuity measuring on the CSF
    • A. 

      The highest spatial frequency grating you can detect

    • B. 

      The lowest spatial frequency grating you can detect

    • C. 

      The limits of our spatial frequency grating detection

    • D. 

      The complete range of the spatial frequency gratings we can detect

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