Pelvic Girdle And Lower Limb

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| By Jeniferclaire
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Jeniferclaire
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 659
Questions: 20 | Attempts: 661

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Pelvic Girdle And Lower Limb - Quiz

Questions to revise - lectures on lower limbs, hip/pelvic girdle and foot


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following is NOT an origin of gluteus maximus?

    • A.

      Iliac crest

    • B.

      Posterior gluteal line

    • C.

      ASIS

    • D.

      Sacrum

    • E.

      Coccyx

    Correct Answer
    C. ASIS
    Explanation
    The anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) is not an origin of the gluteus maximus muscle. The gluteus maximus originates from the iliac crest, posterior gluteal line, sacrum, and coccyx. The ASIS is a bony prominence located at the front of the iliac crest, but it is not a point of origin for the gluteus maximus muscle.

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  • 2. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of the psoas minor?

    • A.

      Originates at sides of T12-L1

    • B.

      Inserts at lesser trochanter

    • C.

      Inserts at the pectineal line

    • D.

      Produces hip flexion

    • E.

      Inserts at the iliopectineal eminence

    Correct Answer
    B. Inserts at lesser trochanter
    Explanation
    The psoas minor is a muscle that originates at the sides of T12-L1 and inserts at the iliopectineal eminence. It does not insert at the lesser trochanter. It is responsible for producing hip flexion.

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  • 3. 

    Which of the following innervated sartorius

    • A.

      Tibail nerve

    • B.

      Obturator nerve

    • C.

      Femoral nerve

    • D.

      Anterior rami

    • E.

      Common fibular nerve

    Correct Answer
    C. Femoral nerve
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the femoral nerve. The femoral nerve is responsible for innervating the sartorius muscle. This muscle is located in the anterior compartment of the thigh and is involved in flexing, abducting, and rotating the hip joint. The femoral nerve originates from the lumbar plexus and provides motor and sensory innervation to the muscles and skin of the anterior thigh and medial leg.

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  • 4. 

    Which of the following is NOT an action of pectineus?

    • A.

      Hip flexion

    • B.

      Hip medial rotation

    • C.

      Hip adduction

    • D.

      Knee flexion

    • E.

      Hip internal rotation

    Correct Answer
    D. Knee flexion
    Explanation
    The pectineus muscle is located in the hip and thigh region. It functions to flex the hip joint, medially rotate the hip, adduct the hip, and internally rotate the hip. However, it does not have any direct action on the knee joint, such as knee flexion. Therefore, knee flexion is NOT an action of the pectineus muscle.

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  • 5. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of semimembranosus?

    • A.

      Originates at the ischial tuberosity

    • B.

      Inserts on the medial condyle of knee

    • C.

      Flexes the knee

    • D.

      Innervated by the tibial nerve

    • E.

      Inserts at pes ancerineus

    Correct Answer
    E. Inserts at pes ancerineus
    Explanation
    The semimembranosus muscle originates at the ischial tuberosity, inserts on the medial condyle of the knee, and flexes the knee. It is innervated by the tibial nerve. However, it does not insert at pes ancerineus.

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  • 6. 

    Which of the following can produce hip extension

    • A.

      Pectineus

    • B.

      Adductor longus

    • C.

      Adductor brevis

    • D.

      Adductor magnus

    • E.

      Gracilius

    Correct Answer
    D. Adductor magnus
    Explanation
    The adductor magnus is capable of producing hip extension. It is a large muscle located in the inner thigh region. When it contracts, it pulls the thigh bone (femur) towards the back, resulting in hip extension. The other muscles listed, such as pectineus, adductor longus, adductor brevis, and gracilis, are primarily responsible for hip adduction, which is the movement of bringing the thigh towards the midline of the body. Therefore, they do not produce hip extension.

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  • 7. 

    Quadratus femoris inserts on what structure of the hip?

    • A.

      Greater trochanter

    • B.

      Lesser trochanter

    • C.

      Trochanteric fossa

    • D.

      Quadrate tubercle

    • E.

      Linea aspera

    Correct Answer
    D. Quadrate tubercle
    Explanation
    The quadratus femoris muscle inserts on the quadrate tubercle of the hip.

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  • 8. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of the gluteus minimus?

    • A.

      Originates on the lateral ilium

    • B.

      Inserts on the iliotibial band

    • C.

      Innervated by the inferior gluteal nerve

    • D.

      Abducts hip

    • E.

      Can medially and laterally rotate the hip

    Correct Answer
    C. Innervated by the inferior gluteal nerve
    Explanation
    The gluteus minimus is a muscle that originates on the lateral ilium and inserts on the iliotibial band. It is innervated by the superior gluteal nerve, not the inferior gluteal nerve. This muscle is responsible for hip abduction and can also medially and laterally rotate the hip.

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  • 9. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of piriformis?

    • A.

      Originates on the lateral sacral surface

    • B.

      Inserts on greater trochanter

    • C.

      Innervated by ventral rami

    • D.

      Medially rotates the hip

    • E.

      May both abduct and adduct the hip

    Correct Answer
    D. Medially rotates the hip
    Explanation
    The piriformis muscle originates on the lateral sacral surface and inserts on the greater trochanter. It is innervated by ventral rami. It is known to both abduct and adduct the hip. However, it does not medially rotate the hip.

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  • 10. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of the dermatomes?

    • A.

      Lateral aspect of the foot is S1

    • B.

      Lateral leg is L5

    • C.

      Hip is L2

    • D.

      Posterior thigh is S2

    • E.

      Anterior knee is L3

    Correct Answer
    E. Anterior knee is L3
    Explanation
    The anterior knee is not innervated by the L3 dermatome. The correct innervation for the anterior knee is the L4 dermatome. The dermatomes are specific regions of the skin that are innervated by different spinal nerves. In this case, the other statements are true as the lateral aspect of the foot is innervated by the S1 dermatome, the lateral leg is innervated by the L5 dermatome, the hip is innervated by the L2 dermatome, and the posterior thigh is innervated by the S2 dermatome.

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  • 11. 

    Which is not true of the medial meniscus?

    • A.

      It is more O shaped

    • B.

      Is acts as a shock absorber

    • C.

      It anchors anteriorly

    • D.

      It anchors posteriors

    • E.

      It anchors medially

    Correct Answer
    E. It anchors medially
    Explanation
    The medial meniscus does not anchor medially. It is a C-shaped structure located on the inner side of the knee joint, between the femur and tibia bones. Its main functions include acting as a shock absorber, providing stability to the knee joint, and distributing forces during movement. However, it does not anchor medially, as it is not attached to the medial side of the knee joint.

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  • 12. 

    Which of the following is not true of the lateral co-lateral ligament?

    • A.

      It is seperate from the joint capsule

    • B.

      It is commonly injuried during ACL ruptures

    • C.

      It inserts on the fibular head

    • D.

      It resists lateral shear of tibia on femur

    • E.

      It is cord like in its structure

    Correct Answer
    B. It is commonly injuried during ACL ruptures
    Explanation
    The given statement is not true because the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is not commonly injured during ACL ruptures. The LCL is a separate ligament from the joint capsule, it inserts on the fibular head, and it resists lateral shear of the tibia on the femur. It is also cord-like in its structure. However, ACL ruptures primarily involve damage to the anterior cruciate ligament, not the LCL.

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  • 13. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of the anterior colateral ligament?

    • A.

      Its fibres run posterior to anterior

    • B.

      Its fibres run lateral to medial

    • C.

      Its fibres run superior to inferior

    • D.

      It resists posterior shear of the tibia

    • E.

      It cannot heal itself

    Correct Answer
    D. It resists posterior shear of the tibia
    Explanation
    The anterior collateral ligament (ACL) is responsible for stabilizing the knee joint and preventing excessive forward movement of the tibia. It is composed of fibers that run from the lateral femoral condyle to the medial tibial plateau, which means its fibers run lateral to medial. The ACL does not resist posterior shear of the tibia, as it primarily functions to prevent anterior translation of the tibia. Additionally, the ACL has limited ability to heal itself due to its poor blood supply.

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  • 14. 

    Which nerve innervates the anterior compartment of the thigh?

    • A.

      Femoral nerve

    • B.

      Tibial nerve

    • C.

      Obturator nerve

    • D.

      Common fibular nerve

    • E.

      Inferior gluteal

    Correct Answer
    A. Femoral nerve
    Explanation
    The femoral nerve innervates the anterior compartment of the thigh. This nerve is responsible for supplying motor fibers to the muscles in the front of the thigh, including the quadriceps muscles. It also provides sensory innervation to the skin on the front and inner side of the thigh. The other nerves listed, such as the tibial nerve, obturator nerve, common fibular nerve, and inferior gluteal nerve, do not innervate the anterior compartment of the thigh.

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  • 15. 

    Which of the following it NOT true of the vastus medialis?

    • A.

      It is involved in stabilising the knee

    • B.

      It resists the lateral pull of the quad group

    • C.

      Ot often rapidly wastes during injury

    • D.

      It opposes the Q angle

    • E.

      It flexs the knee

    Correct Answer
    E. It flexs the knee
    Explanation
    The vastus medialis is a muscle that is involved in stabilizing the knee joint. It helps to resist the lateral pull of the quad group, which helps in maintaining proper alignment of the knee. During injury, the vastus medialis often rapidly wastes, meaning it can become weaker and lose muscle mass. It also opposes the Q angle, which is the angle formed between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. However, it does not flex the knee. Flexion of the knee is primarily performed by the hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles.

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  • 16. 

    Which of the following is NOT an origin of the vastus medialis?

    • A.

      Distal 1/2 of the intertrochanteric line

    • B.

      Medial linea aspera

    • C.

      Proximal 2/3 of the medial supracondylar ridge

    • D.

      Inferior to the greater trochanter

    • E.

      Tendon of adductor magnus

    Correct Answer
    D. Inferior to the greater trochanter
    Explanation
    The vastus medialis originates from the distal 1/2 of the intertrochanteric line, the medial linea aspera, the proximal 2/3 of the medial supracondylar ridge, and the tendon of adductor magnus. It does not originate from inferior to the greater trochanter.

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  • 17. 

    Which of the following is NOT an action of the rectus femoris?

    • A.

      Hip flexion

    • B.

      Knee extension

    • C.

      Hip lateral rotation

    • D.

      Hip medial rotation

    • E.

      Hip abduction

    Correct Answer
    D. Hip medial rotation
    Explanation
    The rectus femoris is a muscle located in the front of the thigh. It is responsible for two main actions: hip flexion and knee extension. Hip lateral rotation and hip abduction are not actions of the rectus femoris. However, hip medial rotation is also not an action of the rectus femoris. Therefore, the correct answer is hip medial rotation.

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  • 18. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of Popliteus?

    • A.

      Originates on the lateral femoral condyle

    • B.

      Originates on the arcuate ligaments

    • C.

      Medially rotates the femur

    • D.

      Originates on the knee capsule

    • E.

      Inserts on the posterior and proximal tibia

    Correct Answer
    C. Medially rotates the femur
    Explanation
    The popliteus muscle originates on the lateral femoral condyle, the arcuate ligaments, and the knee capsule. It inserts on the posterior and proximal tibia. However, it does not medially rotate the femur.

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  • 19. 

    Which of the following is NOT true of popliteus?

    • A.

      It unlocks the knee by countering femoral medial rotation

    • B.

      It produces relative femoral lateral rotation

    • C.

      Assists the ACL in resisting posterior tibial glide

    • D.

      It flexes the knee

    • E.

      It produces medial rotation of the femur

    Correct Answer
    E. It produces medial rotation of the femur
    Explanation
    The popliteus muscle is responsible for unlocking the knee joint by countering femoral medial rotation. It produces relative femoral lateral rotation and assists the ACL in resisting posterior tibial glide. It also flexes the knee. However, it does not produce medial rotation of the femur.

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  • 20. 

    Which of the following originates at the AIIS (anterior inferior iliac spine)

    • A.

      Sartorius

    • B.

      Rectus femoris

    • C.

      Tensor fascia latae

    • D.

      Vastus medialis

    • E.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    B. Rectus femoris
    Explanation
    The rectus femoris muscle originates at the AIIS (anterior inferior iliac spine). This is a bony projection located on the anterior surface of the ilium, which is part of the hip bone. The rectus femoris is one of the four muscles that make up the quadriceps group in the thigh. It crosses both the hip and knee joints, allowing it to flex the hip and extend the knee. Therefore, the rectus femoris is the correct answer as it originates at the AIIS.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Dec 02, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Jeniferclaire
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