Congenital And Genetic Disorders Quiz!

45 Questions | Total Attempts: 633

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Congenital And Genetic Disorders Quiz!

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A change in a gene is called
    • A. 

      Genetic engineering

    • B. 

      A mutation

    • C. 

      A gene

    • D. 

      A pedigree

  • 2. 
    Hemophilia is a sex-linked genetic disorder. Which statement best describes its inheritance pattern?
    • A. 

      It is recessive in both males and females

    • B. 

      It is recessive in males but dominant in females

    • C. 

      It is recessive in females but dominant in males

    • D. 

      It is dominant in both males and females

  • 3. 
    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked trait. That means that it is most commonly passed from:
    • A. 

      Father to son

    • B. 

      Mother to son

    • C. 

      Father to daughter

    • D. 

      Mother to daughter

  • 4. 
    The presence of more than 2 chromosomes to a set. This occurs when a germ cell containing more than 23 chromosomes is involved in conception.
    • A. 

      Nondisjunction

    • B. 

      Polysomy

    • C. 

      Fetal alcohol syndrome

    • D. 

      TORCH

  • 5. 
    The chromosomes of the same quantity and type in both sexes (44 in humans).
    • A. 

      Sex chromosomes

    • B. 

      Linkage

    • C. 

      Autosomes

    • D. 

      Barr bodies

  • 6. 
    Down syndrome is an example of a/an?
    • A. 

      Autosomal dominant disorder

    • B. 

      Multifactorial disorder

    • C. 

      Development defect

    • D. 

      Chromosomal disorder

  • 7. 
    Agents that cause damage during embryonic or fetal development are called:
    • A. 

      Teratogeneic

    • B. 

      Mutagenic

    • C. 

      Multifactorial agents

    • D. 

      Polygenic agents

  • 8. 
    What is an example of multifactorial congenital disorder?
    • A. 

      Type AB blood

    • B. 

      Down syndrome

    • C. 

      Color blindness

    • D. 

      Cleft lip and palate

  • 9. 
    Ultrasonography during pregnancy would be helpful in detecting fetal.
    • A. 

      Enzyme deficits

    • B. 

      Structural anamolies

    • C. 

      Chromosomal defects

    • D. 

      Hormonal abnormalities

  • 10. 
    Inactivated and highly condensed X chromosomes in females.
    • A. 

      Linkage

    • B. 

      Abnormalitiy

    • C. 

      Crossing over

    • D. 

      Barr bodies

  • 11. 
    The tendency of genes located on the same chomosome to be transmitted together in inheritance; can be disrupted by crossing over.
    • A. 

      Linkage

    • B. 

      Abnoramlity

    • C. 

      Disorder D

    • D. 

      Crossing over

  • 12. 
    A disease that most affected children have normal parents, heterozygotes have a normal phenotype, two affected parents will always have affected children, both males and females are affected with equal frequency. Examples: albinism, sickle-cell anemia
    • A. 

      X-linked recessive inheritance

    • B. 

      Autosomal recessive inheritance

    • C. 

      Autosomal dominance inheritance

    • D. 

      Deletion

  • 13. 
    A disease that affected children usually have an affected parent, homozygous dominant are rarely observed, unaffected persons do not transmit the characteristic, both males and females are affected with equal frequency. Examples:Huntington's disorder, achondroplasia, polydactyly, progeria
    • A. 

      Chromosomal mutations

    • B. 

      Autosomal dominance inheritance

    • C. 

      Deletion

    • D. 

      X-linked recessive inheritance

  • 14. 
    A disease that is more males than females are affected, in order for a female to have the characteristic, her father must also have it, Her mother must have it or be a carrier, the characteristic often skips a generation from the grandfather to the grandson, If a woman has the characteristic (is affected), all of her sons will have it. Examples: color blindness, hemophilia
    • A. 

      X-linked recessive inheritance

    • B. 

      Chromosomal mutations

    • C. 

      Deletion

    • D. 

      Duplication

  • 15. 
    Which of the following statements applies to Huntington’s disease?
    • A. 

      The effects are obvious at birth

    • B. 

      There is a test for the defective gene

    • C. 

      There is a 50% probability that the child of an affected parent will be a carrier

    • D. 

      The child must inherit the defective gene from both parents in order to be affected

  • 16. 
    A mother is a carrier of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; the father is unaffected. They have one son with muscular dystrophy. Another male child is expected. The probability of the second son having muscular dystrophy is:
    • A. 

      100%

    • B. 

      50%

    • C. 

      25%

    • D. 

      0%

  • 17. 
    The loss of a chromosome segment, changes in chromosome structure:"point mutations":
    • A. 

      Inversion

    • B. 

      Deletion

    • C. 

      Chromosomal mutations

    • D. 

      Duplication

  • 18. 
    A lab preparation which makes chromosomes visual.
    • A. 

      Karyotype

    • B. 

      Barr bodies

    • C. 

      Sex chromosomes

    • D. 

      Autosomes

  • 19. 
    Changes in chromosome number or arrangement.
    • A. 

      Translocation

    • B. 

      Chromosomal mutations

    • C. 

      Inversion

    • D. 

      Duplication

  • 20. 
    Occurs when a part of one chromosome is transferred to a nonhomologous chromosome. Changes in chromosome structure: "point mutations"
    • A. 

      Translocation

    • B. 

      Monosomy

    • C. 

      Aneuploidy

    • D. 

      Trisomy

  • 21. 
    A condition in which the gametes or cells of an affected individual end up with one extra or one less chromosome than is normal due to nondisjunction (failure of homologous chromosomes or chromatids to separate during meiosis. changes in chromosome number.
    • A. 

      Aneuploidy

    • B. 

      Down syndrome

    • C. 

      Trisomy

    • D. 

      Monosomy

  • 22. 
    The fusion of a gamete with an extra chromosome (n + 1) with a normal gamete resulting in a 2n+1 condition. changes in chromosome number.
    • A. 

      Trisomy

    • B. 

      Monosomy

    • C. 

      Turner syndrome

    • D. 

      Down syndrome

  • 23. 
    The fusion of a gamete with a missing chromosome (n - 1) with a normal gamete resulting in a 2n-1 condition. changes in chromosome number.
    • A. 

      Klinefelter syndrome

    • B. 

      Turner syndrome

    • C. 

      Monosomy

    • D. 

      Down syndrome

  • 24. 
    Results from trisomy 21; results in mental retardation; chances increase with age (trisomy). a chromosomal disorder involving aneuploidy.
    • A. 

      XXY condition

    • B. 

      Klinefelter syndrome

    • C. 

      Down syndrome

    • D. 

      Turner Syndrome

  • 25. 
    Involves females whose cells have only one X chromosome (designated XO); affected individuals are sterile and have other phenotypic problems such as premature aging and shorter life expectancy (monosomy). chromosomal disorder involving aneuploidy.
    • A. 

      Turner syndrome

    • B. 

      Down syndrome

    • C. 

      XXY condition

    • D. 

      Klinefelter syndrome

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