Pat Practice Test

57 Questions | Total Attempts: 7841

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Pat Practice Test

Program aptitude test (PAT) preparation. **This test is intended for preparation purpose only and not for any evaluation purpose. **The format is similar to PAT**Time :90 minutes**Format:Verbal Ability & Communication Skills:20 questions Logical Reasoning & Creative Problem Solving:10 questions Numerical Ability:20 questions Supporting Personality Traits:10 questions**Answers are provided at the end of test and also after each question.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. It is argued that the Indian security system is ____ only in ____ the less resourceful terrorist outfits.
    • A. 

      Useless ;; Helping

    • B. 

      Effective ;; Discouraging

    • C. 

      Useful ;; Encouraging

    • D. 

      Challenged ;; Attacking

  • 2. 
    From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. A more rigorous research is needed to ___ how the new system of medicine works.
    • A. 

      Extract

    • B. 

      Vindicate

    • C. 

      Ascertain

    • D. 

      Expound

  • 3. 
    From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. ‘Nature’ ____ that both success and failure are a part of life, in such a situation, it is best to remain ____ from the outcome.
    • A. 

      Assumed ;; different

    • B. 

      Implies ;; focused

    • C. 

      Dictates ;; detached

    • D. 

      Advises ;; disconnected

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      Proscribed ;; underlying

    • B. 

      Precipitated. ;; undermining

    • C. 

      Retained ;; underscoring

    • D. 

      Deplored ;; underwriting

  • 5. 
    Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Ministers: Council
    • A. 

      Juvenials : School

    • B. 

      Branches : Woods

    • C. 

      Stars : Galaxy

    • D. 

      Pups : Herd

  • 6. 
    Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Radio: Camera
    • A. 

      Listen:see

    • B. 

      Ear:eye

    • C. 

      Mouth :eye

    • D. 

      Speak : see

  • 7. 
    • A. 

      Strength : Muscle

    • B. 

      Fire : spark

    • C. 

      Depth : Fathom

    • D. 

      Joy : Ecstacy

  • 8. 
    Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Religion: Ritual
    • A. 

      Fire: Matches

    • B. 

      Possible: Impossible

    • C. 

      Engine: Ignition

    • D. 

      Belief: Practice

  • 9. 
    Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Debate: Soliloquy
    • A. 

      Monologue : Theory

    • B. 

      Ovation: Silence

    • C. 

      Group : Hermit

    • D. 

      Elegant : Regal

  • 10. 
    Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? What does the author talk about?
    • A. 

      Self reliance

    • B. 

      Expression of self

    • C. 

      Latent feelings

    • D. 

      A genius

  • 11. 
    Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? ‘The soul always hears an admonition’. The admonition is because of  
    • A. 

      Lack of self respect

    • B. 

      Not speaking out one’s mind before somebody says the same

    • C. 

      Dislike of the verses written by the eminent painter

    • D. 

      The valuable sentiment of the reader

  • 12. 
    Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? The author advises us to be as
    • A. 

      Voluble as teenagers

    • B. 

      Eccentric as possible

    • C. 

      Docile as youth

    • D. 

      Individualistic as infants usually are

  • 13. 
    Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? As understood from the passage, a genius is one
    • A. 

      Betrays the perception that the absolutely trustworthy sits at his heart

    • B. 

      Does not bow to pressures of society

    • C. 

      Speaks out what he thinks

    • D. 

      Watches a thought flash across his brain

  • 14. 
    Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pairZealous : Dilettante ::
    • A. 

      Eager : dabbler

    • B. 

      Spectator : fan

    • C. 

      Spellbound : indifferent

    • D. 

      Hot : cold

  • 15. 
    Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Yam : Potato ::
    • A. 

      White : sweet

    • B. 

      Root : tuber

    • C. 

      Goober : peanut

    • D. 

      Stem : root

  • 16. 
    Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Deviant : Orthodox  : :
    • A. 

      Infidel : believer

    • B. 

      Orthodox : heretic

    • C. 

      Conservative : reformed

    • D. 

      Septum : occlusion

  • 17. 
    Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.News report : Descriptive  : :
    • A. 

      Weather report : unpredictable

    • B. 

      Editorial : one-sided

    • C. 

      Feature story : newsworthy

    • D. 

      Commercial : prescriptive

  • 18. 
    Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Minaret : Mosque  : :
    • A. 

      Religion : laity

    • B. 

      Steeple : church

    • C. 

      Dainty : grotesque

    • D. 

      Allure : flash

  • 19. 
    There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
    • A. 

      RSSR

    • B. 

      RSRS

    • C. 

      RRRS

    • D. 

      RSSS

  • 20. 
    There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
    • A. 

      RSRS

    • B. 

      SRSR

    • C. 

      RRRS

    • D. 

      RSSR

  • 21. 
    There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
    • A. 

      RSRS

    • B. 

      SSRR

    • C. 

      RRRS

    • D. 

      RSSR

  • 22. 
    There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
    • A. 

      RSRS

    • B. 

      SSRS

    • C. 

      RRRS

    • D. 

      RSSR

  • 23. 
    There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
    • A. 

      RSRS

    • B. 

      RSSS

    • C. 

      RRRS

    • D. 

      RSSR

  • 24. 
    Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.There’s hardly a government left in the world, whether communist, socialist or free-market conservative, that isn’t openly or wishfully committed to a policy of ‘tough love’ towards it business sector. The ‘love’ is for business as benefactor: Governments now realized that business, and only business, can provide the jobs that provide the paychecks that provide government with the two things it needs to keep going – the tax money that pays for service, and a sense of prosperity that translates as votes. The ‘toughness’ is for business as beseecher: Governments, with a few exceptions, now realize that protecting business enterprises creates bloated companies unable to compete in global markets. In local markets it is like taking money (in higher prices and reduced choices) from consumers – a k.a. voters. Which of the following can be concluded from this paragraph?
    • A. 

      Governments across the world have begun to realize the importance of business enterprises

    • B. 

      Governments have come to know that the consumer voter has already own the game

    • C. 

      Governments around the world have failed to maintain good contact with their business managers

    • D. 

      The socialist governments around the world had been opposing the rapid development of their respective business sectors

  • 25. 
    Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.The Committee of Governmental Experts which worked out the model Provisions did not lose sight of the necessity of maintaining a proper balance between protection against abuses of expressions of folklore, on the one hand, and of the freedom and encouragement of further development and dissemination of folklore, on the other. The Committee took into account that expressions of folklore formed a living body of human culture which should not be stifled by very rigid protection. It also considered that any protecting system should be practicable and effective, rather than a system of imaginative requirements, unworkable in reality? Which of the following can be an inference drawn from this paragraph?
    • A. 

      The Committee has made efforts to reduce the tautness of the laws made for the protection of expression of folklore

    • B. 

      Expressions of folklore are now entirely dependent on the Model provisions

    • C. 

      The Committee’s intention is to negotiate the protection of expressions of folklore and their humanistic elements

    • D. 

      The Committee intends to make the Model Provisions a separate law in itself