Act English - Basic Preview

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Act English - Basic Preview - Quiz

A good overall review of basic ACT English questions!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What two things are essential to make a complete sentence?

    • A.

      Subject + preposition

    • B.

      Subject + object

    • C.

      Subject + verb

    • D.

      Subject + modifier

    Correct Answer
    C. Subject + verb
    Explanation
    The subject is a person or thing which is the main "doer" in the sentence, and the verb is the main action being done. You need a subject and a verb in order to make a complete sentence! Without one of these two elements, the sentence is incomplete.

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  • 2. 

    Read the following sentence: "I plan to go to Belize and swim with sharks." How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      To, go to Belize and swim

    • C.

      To go to, Belize and swim

    • D.

      To go to Belize, and swim

    Correct Answer
    A. No change is necessary
    Explanation
    No comma is necessary in this sentence. Students will often see the "and" and think, the FANBOYS rule says we need a comma before the "and"! However, they forget that it's important that we have two independent clauses on either side of the FANBOYS conjunction. To check for this, try removing the "and" and reading the two clauses separately. It becomes clear that "I plan to go to Belize" is an independent clause, but "swim with sharks" is not! Since that criteria of the FANBOYS rule isn't met, we cannot put a comma in the sentence.

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  • 3. 

    Read the following sentence: "He left his wallet at home so he had no idea how he was going to pay for lunch." How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      At home, so he had no idea how

    • C.

      At home so, he had no idea how

    • D.

      At home so he had no idea, how

    Correct Answer
    B. At home, so he had no idea how
    Explanation
    The correct place for a comma is between "home" and "so" because "so" is one of the FANBOYS conjunctions, and if you remove the "so" you can see that there are two complete sentences on either side of the conjunction ("He left his wallet at home" and "he had no idea how he was going to pay for lunch").

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  • 4. 

    Read the following sentence: "I think I need a doctor because my skin has turned orange with blue spots." How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      I need, a doctor because my skin

    • C.

      I need a doctor, because my skin

    • D.

      I need a doctor because, my skin

    Correct Answer
    A. No change is necessary
    Explanation
    No comma is necessary in this sentence because "because" is not a FANBOYS conjunction!

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  • 5. 

    Read the following sentence: "Our dog a black and white Great Dane is almost the size of a small pony." How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      Dog, a black and white Great Dane, is

    • C.

      Dog, a black and white, Great Dane is

    • D.

      Dog a black, and white, Great Dane is

    Correct Answer
    B. Dog, a black and white Great Dane, is
    Explanation
    The question tests your knowledge of something called the appositives comma rule. An "appositive" is extra information that could be removed from the sentence 1) without messing up the grammar of the sentence and 2) without losing any essential information. The appositive in this sentence is "a black and white Great Dane" because without it, the sentence would read "Our dog is almost the size of a small pony," which is still a complete sentence and we get the main point. In order to indicate that a part of the sentence is an appositive, we have to put commas before and after it.

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  • 6. 

    Read the following sentence: "One student's request for the test to be pushed back caused a chain reaction, as the rest of the class demanded a similar extension." Then answer: The underlined subject is ___________ (singular or plural), so it is _______ (right or wrong) that the apostrophe is before the "s" to show possession.

    • A.

      Singular / right

    • B.

      Singular / wrong

    • C.

      Plural / right

    • D.

      Plural / wrong

    Correct Answer
    A. Singular / right
    Explanation
    The subject of the sentence, "one student," is singular, so the apostrophe should go before the "s" to show that it's "one student's request."

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  • 7. 

    Complete the following statement so that it is true: "It" and "is" can be combined into the contraction ____ (it's or its).  The possessive form of "it" is ____ (it's or its).

    • A.

      Its / its

    • B.

      Its / it's

    • C.

      It's / it's

    • D.

      It's / its

    Correct Answer
    D. It's / its
    Explanation
    A "contraction" is when you smoosh two words into one, like when "do" and "not" become "don't." The apostrophe shows that one of the original letters has been removed (in "don't" the second "o" has been taken out). So the contraction of "it" and "is" becomes "it's." The problem is that usually, when we have a singular subject like "it" and we're trying to show possession, we put an apostrophe before the "s" so the possessive of "it" should be "it's." But "it's" is already the contraction of "it is," like we just said! So for the possessive form of "it," we end up just leaving out the apostrophe, and it becomes "its."

    Want an easy way to remember the difference? Consider the sentence "The dog chewed on its bone." If you aren't sure whether there should be an apostrophe in "its" or not, try substituting "it is" for "its" to see if that would make sense. If it does, then use the apostrophe! But if it doesn't (in this case the sentence would become "The dog chewed on it is bone," which makes no sense), then leave the apostrophe out.

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  • 8. 

    Read the following sentence: "It was raining during the game, so all of the cheerleaders pom-pons got quite soggy." To show possession (that the cheerleaders owned the pom-pons), where should you put an apostrophe in the underlined section above?

    • A.

      Cheerleader's

    • B.

      Cheerleaders'

    • C.

      Cheerleaders's

    • D.

      No apostrophe is necessary

    Correct Answer
    B. Cheerleaders'
    Explanation
    If it was just one cheerleader, the apostrophe would go before the "s" and become "cheerleader's." However, because there are multiple cheerleaders, the apostrophe goes after the "s" and becomes "cheerleaders'." The position of the apostrophe is key, because we should always be able to locate the apostrophe and look to the left of it to identify whether the subject is singular or plural. In the previous question we were given "student's", so everything to the left of the apostrophe is "student." Therefore, we know it's singular, or just one student. In this question we ended up with "cheerleaders'," because we can look to the left of the apostrophe and see "cheerleaders," so we know it's plural, or multiple cheerleaders.

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  • 9. 

    Read the following sentence: "This is our shopping list for IKEA a desk, comfy chairs, and a bamboo plant." What punctuation mark would you put between "IKEA" and "a desk" to indicate the start of a list?

    • A.

      A comma (,)

    • B.

      A colon (:)

    • C.

      A semicolon (;)

    • D.

      A dash (-)

    Correct Answer
    B. A colon (:)
    Explanation
    Colons are used to indicate that a list is about to start. The sentence becomes "This is our shopping list for IKEA: a desk, comfy chairs, and a bamboo plant." The colon sets up the list very nicely for the reader. It is important, however, that there is an independent clause before the colon. For example, if we changed this sentence to read "Our shopping list for IKEA includes a desk, comfy chairs, and a bamboo plant," we couldn't put a colon after IKEA to indicate the list because "Our shopping list for IKEA includes" isn't an independent clause. A colon works for the above sentence only because "This is our shopping list for IKEA" is an independent clause.

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  • 10. 

    Read the following sentence: "It was pointless we would never agree on which superhero, Superman or Batman, was the coolest." What punctuation mark could you put between "pointless" and "we" to link the two complete sentences together?

    • A.

      A comma (,)

    • B.

      A colon (:)

    • C.

      A semicolon (;)

    • D.

      A dash (-)

    Correct Answer
    C. A semicolon (;)
    Explanation
    Semicolons act just like periods; they break up two independent clauses (just like in this explanation sentence, ha!). "It was pointless" and "we would never agree on which superhero, Superman or Batman, was the coolest" are both independent clauses. We could make them two separate sentences if we wanted, but we can also link them together with a semicolon to say "It was pointless; we would never agree on which superhero, Superman or Batman, was the coolest."

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  • 11. 

    Read the following sentence: "My mother - a sweet woman with many wonderful qualities and talents can't cook to save her life." What punctuation mark could you put between "talents" and "can't" in order to complete the writer's tangent about her mother?

    • A.

      A comma (,)

    • B.

      A colon (:)

    • C.

      A semicolon (;)

    • D.

      A dash (-)

    Correct Answer
    D. A dash (-)
    Explanation
    Dashes strongly set apart information that departs from the main idea of the sentence, and they usually come in pairs. In this sentence, the main idea is that "My mother can't cook to save her life." The extra information that she is also "a sweet woman with many wonderful qualities and talents" is radically different from the main information, and is almost contradicting it. So rather than setting it apart with something like commas, we want to show that it's radically different from our main point, so we put dashes around it and it becomes "My mother - a sweet woman with many wonderful qualities and talents - can't cook to save her life."

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  • 12. 

    Which tense of the verb "to play" would make the most sense in the following sentence: "After we finished our game of tag in the rain, we _____ computer games inside the house."

    • A.

      Past tense: "played"

    • B.

      Past participle tense: "have played"

    • C.

      Present tense: "play"

    • D.

      Future tense: "will play"

    Correct Answer
    A. Past tense: "played"
    Explanation
    Because the sentence began with the past tense form with "finished," you want to stay within the same tense for the rest of the sentence, so "played" would be correct.

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  • 13. 

    Read the following sentence: "The coloring of the floors, a horrible green shade of shag carpet, does not match anything else in the house." Then answer: For this sentence, the subject is __________ (singular or plural), so the correct verb form is _______ ("does not" or "do not")

    • A.

      Singular/"do not"

    • B.

      Singular/"does not"

    • C.

      Plural/"do not"

    • D.

      Plural/"does not"

    Correct Answer
    B. Singular/"does not"
    Explanation
    The full subject is "the coloring of the floors," which is singular, even though it looks plural because it ends with "floors." The main focus is on the "coloring," which is a singular thing. Therefore, the correct singular verb form to go along with the singular subject is "does not." It's easier to see when you take out the appositive "a horrible green shade of shag carpet" so the sentence just reads "The coloring of the floors does not match anything else in the house."

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  • 14. 

    Read the following sentence: "The principal gave the award to Hannah and me." Which of the following choices should replace the underlined section?

    • A.

      Hannah and I

    • B.

      I and Hannah

    • C.

      Us, me and Hannah

    • D.

      The underlined section is fine the way it is.

    Correct Answer
    D. The underlined section is fine the way it is.
    Explanation
    If we took out "Hannah and," it would be clear that the sentence "The principal gave the award to me" would be correct. The other options would not be able to pass this test, so the sentence is fine the way it is.

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  • 15. 

    Read the following sentence: "The team celebrated their victory by going out for pizza." Then answer: The subject in this sentence is _________ (singular or plural), so the underlined portion of the above sentence should be ______ (its or their).

    • A.

      Singular/their

    • B.

      Singular/its

    • C.

      Plural/their

    • D.

      Plural/its

    Correct Answer
    B. Singular/its
    Explanation
    The subject in this sentence is "the team." Even though we know that a team is made up of many members, saying "the team" is describing them as one singular entity, so it's a singular subject. Therefore, the correct singular subject pronoun that corresponds is "its," because "their" is only for plural subjects.

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  • 16. 

    Read the following sentence: "You have to speak ____ to avoid waking the baby." Then answer: The correct word to fill in the blank is _____ (quiet or quietly) because it is an ______ (adjective or adverb).

    • A.

      Quiet / Adjective

    • B.

      Quiet / Adverb

    • C.

      Quietly / Adjective

    • D.

      Quietly / Adverb

    Correct Answer
    D. Quietly / Adverb
    Explanation
    Adjectives are words that describe people. places, or things (nouns). Adverbs are words that describe actions (verbs), and they usually end in -ly. In the above sentence, the blank is next to the verb "speak," so we know that we must have a word that describes how you have to speak. The answer is therefore "quietly," and the whole sentence reads "You have to speak quietly to avoid waking the baby."

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  • 17. 

    Read the following sentence: "Between the two animals (the tortoise and the hare), the hare will be able to run _______." Then answer: The correct word to fill in the blank is _______, because it is a comparison between only two things.

    • A.

      Fast

    • B.

      Faster

    • C.

      Fastest

    • D.

      More fast

    Correct Answer
    B. Faster
    Explanation
    Words that compare two things, called comparitives, usually end in -er, like "bigger" or "stronger." Words that compare more than two things are called superlatives, and usually end in -est. Here we only have two things to compare, the tortoise and the hare, so "faster" would be correct.

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  • 18. 

    Read the following sentence: "I will stop __ the post office on my way home." Which one of the following words would complete the phrase best, according to the standards of the English language?

    • A.

      For

    • B.

      To

    • C.

      By

    • D.

      Toward

    Correct Answer
    C. By
    Explanation
    Phrases that are just standard to the English language are called "idioms." For some reason, it just sounds right to say "stop by the post office" rather than "stop for the post office" or "stop to the post office." The key for these is to trust your ear; if you think it sounds wrong, then the phrasing probably needs to be changed!

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  • 19. 

    Which one of the following sentences is a fragment?

    • A.

      We didn't know.

    • B.

      That wasn't a problem.

    • C.

      The first attempt that had ever been made to clone the genetic make-up of a human.

    • D.

      While stressful in preparation, the exam ended up being easy in execution.

    Correct Answer
    C. The first attempt that had ever been made to clone the genetic make-up of a human.
    Explanation
    We discussed before that a complete sentence needs a subject and a verb. An incomplete sentence, or a sentence that lacks either a subject or a verb, is called a "fragment." The third option is a fragment because it lacks a verb. It describes "the first attempt," the subject, but never follows through with a verb about what that first attempt is doing. Try reading it aloud; once you get to the end of the fragment, you'll get a feeling that there should be something else to complete it! Don't be fooled into thinking that a fragment is always short; sometimes, like the above sentence, they're actually quite long!

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  • 20. 

    Which of the following sentences is a run-on?

    • A.

      It was awful there wasn't anything we could do.

    • B.

      Although I appreciate Branagh's interpretation, however bombastic he tends to get, my favorite film version will always be the one starring Tenant and Stewart.

    • C.

      I was at a loss for words and thus began to stutter like a penguin in the cold.

    • D.

      My paper - the one I had slaved over and poured my blood, sweat, and tears into - was unceremoniously eaten by my dog.

    Correct Answer
    A. It was awful there wasn't anything we could do.
    Explanation
    A run-on is where there are two independent clauses that aren't properly linked by a conjunction or separated with appropriate punctuation. Please note that, like with fragments, the length of the sentence has nothing to do it! For example, even though the other sentences are very long, the first sentence is the only one that has two independent clauses ("It was awful" and "there wasn't anything we could do) stuck together without any punctuation inbetween, so it is considered a run-on.

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  • 21. 

    Which of the following sentences is properly structured to avoid confusion about the subject?

    • A.

      Walking down Main Street, the town was quiet.

    • B.

      Walking down Main Street, the houses looked empty.

    • C.

      Walking down Main Street, nobody was around.

    • D.

      Walking down Main Street, I felt like I was in a ghost town.

    Correct Answer
    D. Walking down Main Street, I felt like I was in a ghost town.
    Explanation
    This is a question that asks you to fix something called a "misplaced modifier." A modifier is usually a phrase that gives us more detail about the subject, such as what the subject is doing or what the subject looks or feels like. Because modifiers describe subjects, we want to make sure that the modifier is always as close as possible to the subject that it is describing in a sentence. In all the above options, our modifier is "Walking down Main Street." So the question is, WHAT is walking down Main Street? Who is our subject? Even if we don't know for sure, we have to assume that our subject is something that can walk! When we look at the first three options, the subjects that immediately follow the modifier are "the town," "the houses," and "nobody." These are clearly not things that could be walking down Main Street! The last option is the only one that makes it clear WHO is walking down Main Street.

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  • 22. 

    Which of the following transition words WOULD NOT be able to replace the underlined portion in the following sentence: "I wanted to teach the students about proper English grammar.  On the contrary, I didn't want to put them to sleep with my rambling."

    • A.

      Therefore

    • B.

      That said

    • C.

      However

    • D.

      At the same time

    Correct Answer
    A. Therefore
    Explanation
    The underlined word and all the answer options are called "transition" words. A transition is a word or phrase that moves from one idea to the next, and shows how the ideas are related to one another. For example, the transition "on the contrary" shows that the second idea ("I didn't want to put them to sleep with my rambling) is going to contradict, or oppose, the first idea ("I wanted to teach the students about proper English grammar"). The first idea was something I WANTED to do, but the second was something I DIDN"T WANT to do. So if we wanted to replace "on the contrary," we would have to find a transition that has the same function of contradicting or opposing ideas. "However," "that said," and "at the same time" all have that same function. "Therefore" is the only transition that would not have the same function as "on the contrary." "Therefore" is a transition word whose function is to conclude an idea, which is not what we're trying to do here, so it would not be able to replace the underlined portion.

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  • 23. 

    Read the following sentence: "On summer break, I enjoy swimming at the local pool, barbecuing in the backyard, and _______________." Which of the following phrases, inserted in the blank, WOULD NOT follow the sentence structure of the above sentence?

    • A.

      Sleeping in until noon

    • B.

      Not stressing about homework

    • C.

      Going on vacation with my family

    • D.

      To visit the Ann Arbor summer festival

    Correct Answer
    D. To visit the Ann Arbor summer festival
    Explanation
    In this sentence, we have an example of something called "parallel structures." If you remember from math class, "parallel" means something that runs similarly side by side. In this case, we apply the idea of parallelism to the way the verbs are set up in a list. The sentence sets up the parallel verb structures of "swimming" and "barbecuing," so for the third activity that goes in the blank we want something that follows the same pattern; we need a verb that ends in -ing. The first three options all meet this criteria ("sleeping," "stressing," and "going"), and the last option is the only one that doesn't ("to visit" rather than "visiting").

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  • 24. 

    Read the following two sentences: 1. The US Congress passed the bill. 2.  The bill was passed by the US Congress. Then answer:  The better sentence is the ______ (first or second) sentence because it's written in _______ (active or passive) voice.

    • A.

      First / active

    • B.

      First / passive

    • C.

      Second / active

    • D.

      Second / passive

    Correct Answer
    A. First / active
    Explanation
    When the typical sentence structure of Subject + Verb + Object is followed, it is called "active voice." It feels "active" because it's very clear who is doing what to what! An example of this is sentence number 1, where "the US Congress" (Subject) "passed" (Verb) "the bill (Object). "Passive voice" is where this order is switched around to Object + Verb + Subject. It feels "passive" because we don't see the subject, the main "doer" of the verb, until the very end. An example of this is sentence number 2, where "the bill" (Object) "was passed by" (Verb) "the US Congress" (Subject).

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  • 25. 

    Which of the following sentences contains unnecessary, or redundant, extra information?

    • A.

      My worry, which felt like a fully-trained sumo wrestler sitting on my chest, did not seem like it was going away anytime soon.

    • B.

      The international message was broadcast all over the world.

    • C.

      Worn and dog-eared, with a binding held together by duct-tape, the textbook looked like an old war veteran.

    • D.

      The adventure was frightening, uncomfortable, and dangerous, and I can't wait to go on another one.

    Correct Answer
    B. The international message was broadcast all over the world.
    Explanation
    If something is "redundant," it means that it is extra information that is unnecessary because it has already been covered. For example, saying "baby puppies" is redundant, because we know that "puppies" are baby dogs, so we don't need to also call them "baby." In the sentence "The international message was broadcast all over the world," we already know that "international" means something is going all over the world, so saying "all over the world" at the end gets redundant.

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  • 26. 

    Read the following sentence: "Before we watch the movie we have to make popcorn." How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      We, watch the movie we have to

    • C.

      We watch, the movie we have to

    • D.

      We watch the movie, we have to

    Correct Answer
    D. We watch the movie, we have to
    Explanation
    The sentence needs a comma to be placed between "movie" and "we," because it shows the separation between the introductory dependent clause "Before we watch the movie" and the following independent clause, "we have to make popcorn."

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  • 27. 

    Read the following sentence: "While they had gone into the tournament confidently, the team members were all stunned by their crushing defeat." What is the main subject of this sentence?

    • A.

      They

    • B.

      The team

    • C.

      The team members

    • D.

      Their crushing defeat

    Correct Answer
    C. The team members
    Explanation
    "The team members" is the main subject because it is the subject of the independent clause in the sentence. "They" is part of the dependent clause at the beginning, so it can't be the main subject, and "the team" is not complete because we are talking about all the members. "Their crushing defeat" is something called the "object" of the sentence, or the thing that the subject is doing something to.

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  • 28. 

    Read the following sentence: "Before I could go to the concert, I had to make sure that all my schoolwork was done." Then answer: The part of the sentence before the comma is a(n) __________________ (independent or dependent) clause, and the part of the sentence after the comma is a(n) __________________ (independent or dependent) clause.

    • A.

      Independent / independent

    • B.

      Independent / dependent

    • C.

      Dependent / independent

    • D.

      Dependent / dependent

    Correct Answer
    C. Dependent / independent
    Explanation
    The part of the sentence before the comma is not a complete sentence and cannot stand on its own, so it is a dependent clause. Consider that if someone just said "Before I could go to the concert!" we would think that there was more they meant to say! The part of the sentence after the comma is a complete sentence ("I had to make sure that all my schoolwork was done.") and could stand independently from the rest, so it is an independent clause.

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  • 29. 

    What does FANBOYS stand for?

    • A.

      For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So

    • B.

      First, And, Not, Because, Only, Since

    • C.

      Fuchsia, Apple, Neon, Blue, Orange, Yellow, Scarlet

    • D.

      Foxtrot, Alpha, November, Bravo, Oscar, Yankee, Sierra

    Correct Answer
    A. For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So
    Explanation
    FANBOYS is an easy way to remember some very important "conjunctions." A conjunction is a word that joins parts of a sentence; the most common ones are "and," "but, " and "or." It is very important to learn what FANBOYS stands for, because there is a very important comma rule involving FANBOYS conjunctions.

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  • 30. 

    Fill in the blank so that the following statement is correct: For the FANBOYS comma rule, you must put a comma before every FANBOYS conjunction IF AND ONLY IF there is a(n) ___________ (dependent or independent) clause before the conjunction and a(n) _____________ (dependent or independent) clause after the conjunction.

    • A.

      Dependent / dependent

    • B.

      Dependent / independent

    • C.

      Independent / dependent

    • D.

      Independent / independent

    Correct Answer
    D. Independent / independent
    Explanation
    For the FANBOYS comma rule, you must put a comma before For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, or So in a sentence if it is surrounded by two independent clauses. For example, "I'm writing this explanation, and I'm enjoying every minute of it," I put a comma before "and" because "I'm writing this explanation" and "I'm enjoying every minute of it" are both independent clauses. However, if I changed the sentence to "I'm writing this explanation and enjoying every minute of it," I WOULD NOT put a comma before "and" because now "enjoying every minute of it" is a dependent clause.

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  • 31. 

    True or False: Its' is the plural possessive form of "it."

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    "Its'," with an apostrophe after the "s" like that, doe not exist. If you see this anywhere, just know that it is wrong. The reason is that "it" is always singular and has no plural form; you cannot have multiple "its."

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  • 32. 

    Read the following sentence:"The scientist Rosalind Franklin discovered the double helix."How should the underlined portion be changed?

    • A.

      No change is necessary

    • B.

      The scientist, Rosalind Franklin discovered,

    • C.

      The scientist, Rosalind Franklin, discovered

    • D.

      The, scientist Rosalind Franklin, discovered

    Correct Answer
    A. No change is necessary
    Explanation
    No commas are necessary. Often students who have learned the appositive rule will want to put commas around the name Rosalind Franklin, thinking that it could be removed from the sentence and the remaining sentence, "The scientist discovered the double helix," would still be grammatically correct. However, the problem is that we have lost the essential information, which is WHO discovered the double helix! Just saying "the scientist" is too vague and doesn't give us any useful information. So in this case, we would not put any commas in the sentence.

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  • 33. 

    Which of the following options WOULD NOT be an acceptable way to either link or separate these two independent clauses: "I love Cedar Point" and "my favorite ride is the Millennium Force."

    • A.

      I love Cedar Point; my favorite ride is the Millennium Force.

    • B.

      I love Cedar Point, my favorite ride is the Millennium Force.

    • C.

      I love Cedar Point, and my favorite ride is the Millennium Force.

    • D.

      I love Cedar Point. My favorite ride is the Millennium Force.

    Correct Answer
    B. I love Cedar Point, my favorite ride is the Millennium Force.
    Explanation
    These two clauses are independent clauses, meaning they could be complete sentences on their own. A semicolon, a period, and a comma with the "and" conjunction would be options for joining or separating them. The second option, which uses just a comma between them, is not a sufficient separation between the two independent clauses. That situation, where a comma tries to do a period's job but fails, is known as a "comma splice," and it isn't proper grammar.

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  • 34. 

    Complete the following sentence so that the statement is correct:Parts of a sentence that could be complete sentences on their own are called __________ (dependent or independent) clauses, and parts of a sentence that could not be complete sentences on their own are called ___________ (dependent or independent) clauses.

    • A.

      Dependent / dependent

    • B.

      Dependent / independent

    • C.

      Independent / independent

    • D.

      Independent / dependent

    Correct Answer
    D. Independent / dependent
    Explanation
    A "clause" is a fancy English word for a part of a sentence. For rules of grammar, it is extremely important to be able to identify, within a sentence, which clauses are independent and which clauses are dependent. An independent clause is a part of a sentence that, if you removed it from the current sentence it was in and made it its own sentence, it would be a complete sentence. It's independent, so it can be complete all by itself! A dependent clause is a part of a sentence that, if you removed it from its current sentence and put it by itself, it would be an incomplete sentence. It's dependent, so it depends on another clause in order to be complete. For example, consider the sentence "If we want to get through the rest of this quiz, these explanations have to get shorter." The independent clause is "these explanations have to get shorter" because it's a complete sentence, and the dependent clause is "if we want to get through the rest of this quiz" because it cannot stand alone.

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  • 35. 

    Read the following sentence:"The lawyers meet in the old library."Where should an apostrophe be placed in the underlined portion?

    • A.

      No apostrophe is necessary

    • B.

      Lawyer's

    • C.

      Lawyers'

    • D.

      Law'yers

    Correct Answer
    A. No apostrophe is necessary
    Explanation
    Be careful! Sometimes you get so caught up on thinking about where to put apostrophes that you forget to think about whether or not you need one! Apostrophes are used to show possession; in the above sentence, there is no possession going on. "The lawyers" is plural; there are multiple lawyers, but they aren't claiming ownership of anything, so no apostrophe is necessary.

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