General Knowledge Trivia Quiz On Politics And History!

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Catherine Halcomb
C
Catherine Halcomb
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 1428 | Total Attempts: 5,929,496
Questions: 20 | Attempts: 435

SettingsSettingsSettings
Politics Quizzes & Trivia

Below is a general knowledge trivia quiz on politics and history! The constitution has had different amendments since its creation so as to sit with the times as some of the laws were either biased or didn’t serve well for justice systems. How has politics changed from the time when America had its first president till not? This quiz will help refresh your memory. Do give it a shot and see how well you do!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    The segregation that is imposed by law.

    • A.

      De jure segregation

    • B.

      De facto segregation

    • C.

      Discrimination

    • D.

      Prejudice

    Correct Answer
    A. De jure segregation
    Explanation
    De jure segregation refers to the segregation that is enforced by law. This means that there are specific laws or policies in place that mandate the separation of different racial or ethnic groups. This is different from de facto segregation, which refers to segregation that occurs in practice, even if it is not legally mandated. Discrimination and prejudice are related concepts, but they do not specifically refer to segregation. Discrimination refers to the unfair or unequal treatment of individuals or groups based on certain characteristics, while prejudice refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes towards others based on their membership in a particular group.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Court Case in 1896 which ruled that segregation was constitutional as long as the facilities for blacks and whites were "separate but equal".

    • A.

      Plessy vs Ferguson

    • B.

      Brown vs Board of Education

    • C.

      Marshall vs Madison

    • D.

      Sweatt vs McLaurin

    Correct Answer
    A. Plessy vs Ferguson
    Explanation
    Plessy vs Ferguson is the correct answer because it was a court case in 1896 that established the "separate but equal" doctrine. The case involved a man named Homer Plessy who challenged a Louisiana law that required separate train cars for blacks and whites. The Supreme Court ruled that segregation was constitutional as long as the facilities provided for each race were equal. This decision upheld racial segregation laws and had a significant impact on civil rights in the United States, allowing for the legal segregation of public facilities for decades.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Segregation by unwritten custom or tradition and was a fact of life.

    • A.

      De jure segregation

    • B.

      De facto segregation

    • C.

      An American Dilemma

    • D.

      Congress of Racial Equality

    Correct Answer
    B. De facto segregation
    Explanation
    De facto segregation refers to the segregation that occurs in practice or in reality, rather than being legally mandated. This means that even though there may not be any official laws or regulations enforcing segregation, it still exists due to unwritten customs or traditions. It was a prevalent and accepted form of segregation in American society, particularly during the time period discussed in the question. The term "de facto" is used to distinguish this type of segregation from "de jure" segregation, which refers to segregation that is explicitly mandated by laws or regulations.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    James Farmer and several others founded this group which was convinced that African Americans could apply direct nonviolent methods to gain Civil Rights.

    • A.

      Congress of Racial Equality

    • B.

      Montgomery Improvement Association

    • C.

      Freedom Riders

    • D.

      NAACP

    Correct Answer
    A. Congress of Racial Equality
    Explanation
    The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded by James Farmer and others with the belief that African Americans could achieve Civil Rights through direct nonviolent methods. CORE played a significant role in the Civil Rights Movement, organizing sit-ins, freedom rides, and other forms of peaceful protest to challenge racial segregation and discrimination. Their efforts aimed to bring about social and political change by highlighting the injustices faced by African Americans and advocating for equal rights and opportunities.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    Proclaimed that "in the field of public education the doctrine of separate but equal has no place."

    • A.

      Earl Warren

    • B.

      Thurgood Marshall

    • C.

      Harry Truman

    • D.

      Linda Brown

    Correct Answer
    A. Earl Warren
    Explanation
    Earl Warren is the correct answer because he made the statement that "in the field of public education the doctrine of separate but equal has no place." This statement reflects his stance against racial segregation in schools, which was a significant issue during his time as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Warren's leadership and the Court's subsequent ruling in Brown v. Board of Education played a pivotal role in ending segregation in public schools.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Arkansas governor who used the state national guard to prevent 8 African American students from attending Central High School. 

    • A.

      Orval Faubus

    • B.

      Dwight D. Eisenhower

    • C.

      Elizabeth Eckford

    • D.

      Rosa Parks

    Correct Answer
    A. Orval Faubus
    Explanation
    Orval Faubus is the correct answer because he was the governor of Arkansas who infamously used the state national guard to block the enrollment of eight African American students at Central High School in 1957. This event, known as the Little Rock Nine, sparked a major civil rights crisis and ultimately led to President Dwight D. Eisenhower sending federal troops to ensure the students' safety and enforce desegregation. Elizabeth Eckford was one of the African American students who attempted to attend Central High School, and Rosa Parks is known for her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    This law established the United States Civil Rights Commission which had the power to investigate violations of civil rights and gave the US attorney General greater power to protect the voting rights of African Americans.

    • A.

      Civil Rights Act of 1957

    • B.

      Brown v Board of Education

    • C.

      Voting Rights Act

    • D.

      African American Act

    Correct Answer
    A. Civil Rights Act of 1957
    Explanation
    The Civil Rights Act of 1957 is the correct answer because it established the United States Civil Rights Commission, which had the authority to investigate civil rights violations. It also granted the US Attorney General more power to safeguard the voting rights of African Americans. This legislation was a significant step towards ensuring equality and protecting the civil rights of African Americans in the United States.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    African American in December 1955 who refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery which started the bus boycott and kicked off Martin Luther King Jr.'s career.

    • A.

      Rosa Parks

    • B.

      Linda Brown

    • C.

      Orval Faubus

    • D.

      Elizabeth Eckford

    Correct Answer
    A. Rosa Parks
    Explanation
    Rosa Parks is the correct answer because in December 1955, she famously refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her act of defiance sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a pivotal event in the Civil Rights Movement. This boycott, led by Martin Luther King Jr., brought attention to the issue of racial segregation and discrimination in public transportation. Rosa Parks' courageous action and the subsequent boycott played a significant role in shaping Martin Luther King Jr.'s career as a prominent civil rights leader.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Martin Luther King Jr and Ralph Abernathy form this organization which was primarily made up of African American ministers and advocated nonviolent resistance to fight injustice.

    • A.

      National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

    • B.

      Southern Christian Leadership Conference

    • C.

      Montgomery Improvement Association

    • D.

      Congress of Rational Equality

    Correct Answer
    B. Southern Christian Leadership Conference
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. This organization was formed by Martin Luther King Jr and Ralph Abernathy and consisted mainly of African American ministers. It advocated for nonviolent resistance as a means to fight against injustice.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    When did students begin to visit lunch counters with African Americans in Greensboro North Carolina?

    • A.

      Sit In

    • B.

      Strike

    • C.

      Walk Out

    • D.

      Wade in

    Correct Answer
    A. Sit In
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Sit In." In the 1960s, students in Greensboro, North Carolina began to visit lunch counters with African Americans as a form of protest against racial segregation. They would sit at the counters and refuse to leave until they were served, challenging the discriminatory policies of the time. This act of civil disobedience played a significant role in the Civil Rights Movement and helped bring attention to the issue of racial inequality in the United States.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Helped to start the Student NonViolent Coordinating Committee which as its goal tried to create grassroots movement that involved all classes of African Americans in the struggle to defeat white racism and to obtain equality.

    • A.

      Ella Baker

    • B.

      Martin Luther King Jr.

    • C.

      Linda Brown

    • D.

      Ralph Abernathy

    Correct Answer
    A. Ella Baker
    Explanation
    Ella Baker was instrumental in starting the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which aimed to mobilize African Americans from all social classes in the fight against white racism and for equality. Her goal was to create a grassroots movement that empowered individuals and communities to take action. Baker believed in the power of collective action and organizing at the local level, which aligned with the principles of the SNCC. Her leadership and dedication to the civil rights movement made her the correct answer for this question.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Supreme Court ruling in 1960 which stated segregation on interstate buses and in waiting rooms was illegal.

    • A.

      Boynton v Virginia

    • B.

      Brown v Board of Education

    • C.

      Plessy v Ferguson

    • D.

      Civil Rights Act of 1957

    Correct Answer
    A. Boynton v Virginia
    Explanation
    In the Boynton v Virginia case, the Supreme Court ruled in 1960 that segregation on interstate buses and in waiting rooms was illegal. This ruling was significant in the Civil Rights Movement as it affirmed that segregation in public transportation was unconstitutional and violated the rights of African Americans. The case set an important precedent for future civil rights cases and helped to dismantle the Jim Crow laws that enforced racial segregation.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    Air force veteran who was admitted to the University of Mississippi in the face of severe segregation and discrimination in 1962.

    • A.

      James Meredith

    • B.

      Medgar Evers

    • C.

      John F Kennedy

    • D.

      Ross Barnett

    Correct Answer
    A. James Meredith
    Explanation
    James Meredith is the correct answer because he was the first African American student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi in 1962. This was a significant event during the Civil Rights Movement, as it challenged the segregation and discrimination that was prevalent at the time. Meredith's admission was met with protests and violence, but he persevered and successfully enrolled, paving the way for more integration in educational institutions.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    Birmingham's Public Safety Commissioner who used police dogs and fire hoses on Civil Rights protestors.

    • A.

      T. Eurene "Bull" Connor

    • B.

      Medgar Evers

    • C.

      Orval Faubus

    • D.

      Robert Kennedy

    Correct Answer
    A. T. Eurene "Bull" Connor
    Explanation
    T. Eurene "Bull" Connor is the correct answer because he was Birmingham's Public Safety Commissioner who infamously used police dogs and fire hoses on Civil Rights protestors. This brutal response to peaceful demonstrations became a symbol of the violent resistance against the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Medgar Evers was a prominent civil rights activist who was assassinated, Orval Faubus was the governor of Arkansas who resisted desegregation, and Robert Kennedy was the Attorney General who played a significant role in advancing civil rights legislation.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    Event which took place on August 28, 1963 attended by Martin Luther King Jr. at the Lincoln Memorial where the crown listed to the "I have a dream speech"

    • A.

      March on Washington

    • B.

      Freedom Rides

    • C.

      Civil Rights Act

    • D.

      SCLC

    Correct Answer
    A. March on Washington
    Explanation
    The March on Washington is the correct answer because it is the event that took place on August 28, 1963, where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous "I have a dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial. The March on Washington was a peaceful protest organized by civil rights leaders to advocate for equal rights and an end to racial segregation in the United States. It was attended by hundreds of thousands of people and is considered a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    The act banned segregation in public accommodations and gave the federal government the ability to compel state and local school boards to desegregate their schools.  The act also allowed the Justice Department to prosecute individuals who violated people's civil rights and outlawed discrimination in employment.

    • A.

      Civil Rights Act of 1957

    • B.

      Civil Rights Act of 1964

    • C.

      Voter Rights Act

    • D.

      I have a dream Act

    Correct Answer
    B. Civil Rights Act of 1964
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This act was a landmark piece of legislation that aimed to end racial segregation and discrimination in the United States. It prohibited segregation in public accommodations such as restaurants, hotels, and theaters. Additionally, it granted the federal government the power to enforce desegregation in schools and authorized the Justice Department to prosecute those who violated individuals' civil rights. The act also outlawed employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Overall, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a significant step towards achieving equality and justice for all Americans.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    About 1,000 volunteers, mostly black and whites students flooded into Mississippi to register voters in 1964.

    • A.

      Freedom Summer

    • B.

      Freedom Riders

    • C.

      Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • D.

      March on Washington

    Correct Answer
    A. Freedom Summer
    Explanation
    In 1964, a significant event called Freedom Summer took place in Mississippi, where around 1,000 volunteers, including black and white students, came together to register voters. This movement aimed to combat racial discrimination and promote civil rights by increasing African American voter participation. The volunteers faced immense challenges, including violence and intimidation from white supremacists, but their efforts played a crucial role in raising awareness about the need for equal voting rights and paved the way for significant changes in the American civil rights movement.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    In 1965 Martin Luther King, Jr, and the SCLC organized a major campaign in Alabama to pressure the federal government to enact voting rights legislation.

    • A.

      March on Selma

    • B.

      Montgomery Bus Boycott

    • C.

      Birmingham Protests

    • D.

      March on Washington

    Correct Answer
    A. March on Selma
    Explanation
    The correct answer is March on Selma. In 1965, Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) organized a campaign in Selma, Alabama to advocate for voting rights legislation. This campaign included a series of protests and marches, most notably the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, which drew national attention and ultimately led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The March on Selma was a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement and played a significant role in advancing voting rights for African Americans.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    The Act banned literacy tests and empowered the federal government to oversee voter registration and elections in states that had discriminated against minorities.

    • A.

      Voting Rights Act of 1965

    • B.

      Civil Rights Act of 1964

    • C.

      Civil Rights Act of 1957

    • D.

      African American Act of 1954

    Correct Answer
    A. Voting Rights Act of 1965
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Voting Rights Act of 1965. This act was passed to address the issue of voter discrimination against minorities, particularly African Americans, in the United States. It prohibited the use of literacy tests as a requirement for voting, which had been used as a means to disenfranchise minority voters. Additionally, the act gave the federal government the authority to oversee voter registration and elections in states that had a history of discrimination. This was a significant step towards ensuring equal voting rights for all citizens and combating racial discrimination in the electoral process.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    Huey Newton and Bobby Seale formed this organization soon after Stokely Carmichael used the term "black power"  and organized armed patrols of African Americans around urban neighborhoods. 

    • A.

      Nation of Islam

    • B.

      Black Panthers

    • C.

      SCLC

    • D.

      NAACP

    Correct Answer
    B. Black Panthers
    Explanation
    Huey Newton and Bobby Seale formed the Black Panthers organization in response to Stokely Carmichael's use of the term "black power" and his organization of armed patrols of African Americans in urban neighborhoods. The Black Panthers aimed to empower and protect African Americans, advocating for self-defense and community service. They also fought against police brutality and racial inequality, and their formation marked a significant moment in the Civil Rights Movement.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Mar 10, 2014
    Quiz Created by
    Catherine Halcomb
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.