L.A. 7 Final (Semester 2)

47 Questions | Total Attempts: 44

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Grammar Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Read the following passage From “The Log Jam” from River Notes: the Dance of the Herons by Barry Holstun Lopez and answer the question below:  A storm came this year, against which all other storms were to be measured, on a Saturday in October, a balmy afternoon. Men in the woods cutting firewood for winter, and children outside with melancholy thoughts lodged somewhere in the memory of summer. It built as it came up the valley as did every fall storm, but the steel-gray thunderheads, the first sign of it anyone saw, were higher, much higher, too high. In the stillness before it hit, men looked at each other as though a fast and wiry man had pulled a knife in a bar. They felt the trees falling before they heard the wind, and they dropped tools and scrambled to get out. The wind came up suddenly and like a scythe, like piranha after them, like seawater through a breach in a dike. The first blow bent trees in half to the ground, the second caught them and snapped them like kindling, sending limbs raining down and twenty-foot splinters hurling through the air like mortar shells to stick quivering in the ground. Bawling cattle running the fences, a loose lawnmower bumping across a lawn, a stray dog lunging or a child racing by. The big trees went down screaming, ripping open holes in the wind that were filled with the broken-china explosion of a house and the yawing screech of a pickup rubbed across asphalt, the rivet popping and twang of phone and electric wires       It was over in three or four minutes. The eerie sucking silence it left behind seemed palpably evil, something that would get into the standing timber, like insects, a memory.      No one was killed. Roads were cut off, a bridge buckled. No power. A few had to walk in from places far off in the steep wooded country, arriving home later than they’d ever been up. Some said it pulled the community together, others how they hated living in the trees with no light. No warning. The next day it rained and the woods smelled like ashes. It was four or five days before they got the roads opened and the phones working, electricity back. Three sent down to the hospital in Holterville. Among the dead, Cawley Besson’s dog. And two deer, butchered and passed quietly in parts among neighbors.       Of the trees that fell into the river, a number came up like beached whales among willows at the tip of an island.   From “The Log Jam” from River Notes: the Dance of the Herons by Barry Holstun Lopez. Copyright © 1976 by Barry Holstun Lopez. All rights reserved. Reproduced by permission of SSL/terling Lord Literistic, Inc. Before the storm, people are _________________.  
    • A. 

      Preparing breakfast and going to work

    • B. 

      Going about their everyday activities

    • C. 

      Going into town to attend a festival

    • D. 

      Buying supplies in preparation for the storm

  • 2. 
    Identify the figure of speech in the sentence, The road was a ribbon of moonlight.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 3. 
    A contraction ____________have an apostrophe to show where letters have been left out.
    • A. 

      Should

    • B. 

      Should not

  • 4. 
    Yosemite Safety   Backcountry hazards   The risks of wilderness travel or danger from accidents, wildlife, and natural phenomena must be accepted as part of the wilderness experience. Common sense and some knowledge of safe travel and camping techniques are required to protect yourself and others from harm. Be alert to the following situations:   Weather   Sudden changes in weather catch many unaware. Drenching thunderstorms can form in a matter of hours, and snow can fall at any time during the year. Be prepared for all weather conditions. Afternoon thunderstorms are a frequent and spectacular occurrence in the Yosemite wilderness. These summer storms often bring intense rain, hail, and lightning strikes, particularly in mid- to late afternoon. Plan to be over passes and away from high open areas by noon. During a storm, stay away from peaks (particularly Half Dome), ridges, caves, water, and open areas. Seek shelter in low forested areas, but avoid tall, solitary trees. By setting up camp in a safe location before lightning begins, you can enjoy the power and spectacle of a mountain thunderstorm without apprehension.   High water   During early spring and summer, run-off from melting snow can cause high water levels and swift currents in rivers and streams. Please remember that any unbridged stream crossing may be hazardous. Cross in a wide shallow spot that is not above rapids or falls. Unbuckle waist straps, use a long stick for stability, and face upstream while crossing. Don’t tie yourself in to “safety ropes”—they can drown you. Water will be extremely cold. Caution should be used to prevent conditions that may lead to hypothermia 1.    There are two known diseases carried by ticks in this area: Lyme disease and relapsing fever (borelliosis). Not all ticks carry these diseases. If you are bitten by a tick and later experience flu-like symptoms, contact your doctor and mention you had a tick bite. If you are diagnosed as having Lyme disease or relapsing fever, and you believe you got it in Yosemite, have your doctor contact the park sanitarian.   Giardia lamblia   Giardiasis is an intestinal disease caused by Giardia lamblia, a water-borne protozoan 2. Giardia is carried by humans and some domestic and wild animals. Giardia may contaminate lakes and streams. All water or melted snow must be treated by boiling for at least five minutes, using an iodine-based purifier or using a Giardia-rated water filter. Associated symptoms include chronic diarrhea, abdominal cramps, bloating, fatigue, and loss of weight. Treatment by a physician is necessary to kill the organisms.   Safety Hints Safety Hints   It is your responsibility to be aware of potential dangers and to take steps necessary to minimize the chance that you will become lost or injured. Let someone know your itinerary and instruct them to contact Park Service emergency personnel if you are overdue. Stay on the trail!!! In addition to causing severe erosion and damage to fragile habitat, hiking off-trail increases the potential for injury or becoming lost. When hiking with a group, keep track of each other, and wait at all trail junctions. Always carry extra food and water, rain gear, and warm clothing in case you have to spend the night out unexpectedly. If you become ill or injured on the trail and are unable to hike, send someone in your party or a passing hiker for help. Write down and give the messenger your exact location, age, gender, height, weight, and a description of your illness/injury in order to ensure the appropriate emergency response. If you become disoriented or lost, attempt to fix your location using a map, compass, and visible landmarks. If you are unable to locate the trail, stay put! Use a mirror or reflective object to signal for help. Any signal done three times in a series is a universal distress call.    1  hypothermia n.: body temperature that is below normal.   2 protozoan n.: a single-celled, microscopic organism.     Original content Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Additions and changes to the original content are the responsibility of the instructor   This document was written for __________________ .
    • A. 

      Park rangers in Yosemite

    • B. 

      People buying land in the area

    • C. 

      Weather forecasters

    • D. 

      Visitors to Yosemite

  • 5. 
    Read these two folktales. What is one cultural belief these  folk tales reveal?   Oni and the Great Bird Oni is born wearing boots that grow as he grows. When he becomes a warrior, the boots make him immune to enemy arrows. The other young warriors are afraid of Oni’s strange gift and banish him from the village.   The Hummingbird King A chief’s son is born on the day an amazing hummingbird appears and leaves behind a bright red feather. The boy carries the feather with him. Later he realizes that no enemy arrow can hurt him. His uncle is jealous of his gift and decides to kill him.
    • A. 

      Good luck symbols don't work .

    • B. 

      People who are “different” may have special gifts.

    • C. 

      Everyone should always be the same .

  • 6. 
    One aspect of Greek and Roman myths is that they _______________. 
    • A. 

      Often try to explain the forces of nature and the universe

    • B. 

      Are historically accurate records of the ancient world

    • C. 

      Basically remain oral stories and do not appear in other art forms

    • D. 

      Explain mysterious forces as being created by ordinary people

  • 7. 
    1)The Hippodrome was the center of Constantinople's social life. 2)The Hippodrome's main function was as a horse- and chariot-racing track. 3)(The term hippodrome comes from the Greek words hippos ["horse"] and dromos ["path" or "way"]). 4)Besides a race track, it also was the place to see royal ceremonies, parades of victorious generals, political demonstrations, and executions. 5)Acrobats, plays performed by actors, and fights between wild animals also entertained the crowds.   In the paragraph above, identify all the sentences that support the main idea.
    • A. 

      5

    • B. 

      4

    • C. 

      3

    • D. 

      2

    • E. 

      1

  • 8. 
    The “It Says/I Say/And So” chart is a way to connect the text to your own life. Choose the inference about the characters from “Seventh Grade” that best completes the chart.   It Says: After class, Teresa asked him if he would help her with her French and she smiled at him. I Say: When two students of the opposite sex help each other with schoolwork, it usually means they like each other. (This may or not be true in your own experience, but assume that it is true so you can make an inference). And So: ______________
    • A. 

      Teresa has no idea that Victor likes her.

    • B. 

      Teresa probably likes Victor.

    • C. 

      Teresa smiled at Victor but it wasn’t sincere.

  • 9. 
    The purpose of a drama is never to persuade the audience to think or believe something because a drama is not meant to be that serious.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    Identify the figure of speech in the sentence:  Make no bones about it I'm going to get it done! 
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 11. 
    In The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street, most of the plot complications are focused on ____________________.
    • A. 

      Why Maple Street is the only street without power

    • B. 

      Which person will be blamed for Pete Van Horn’s death

    • C. 

      Which person will be blamed for an alien invasion

    • D. 

      Which person is the friendliest neighbor on the street

  • 12. 
    __________________ are those events or circumstances that make it hard for the character to get what he or she wants.
    • A. 

      External conflicts

    • B. 

      Foreshadowings

    • C. 

      Resolutions

    • D. 

      Complications

  • 13. 
    A short story usually has ___________ pages.
    • A. 

      Between 5 and 20 pages

    • B. 

      More than 100 pages

    • C. 

      Between 20 and 100 pages

    • D. 

      Fewer than 100 pages

  • 14. 
    Yosemite Safety   Backcountry hazards   The risks of wilderness travel or danger from accidents, wildlife, and natural phenomena must be accepted as part of the wilderness experience. Common sense and some knowledge of safe travel and camping techniques are required to protect yourself and others from harm. Be alert to the following situations:   Weather   Sudden changes in weather catch many unaware. Drenching thunderstorms can form in a matter of hours, and snow can fall at any time during the year. Be prepared for all weather conditions. Afternoon thunderstorms are a frequent and spectacular occurrence in the Yosemite wilderness. These summer storms often bring intense rain, hail, and lightning strikes, particularly in mid- to late afternoon. Plan to be over passes and away from high open areas by noon. During a storm, stay away from peaks (particularly Half Dome), ridges, caves, water, and open areas. Seek shelter in low forested areas, but avoid tall, solitary trees. By setting up camp in a safe location before lightning begins, you can enjoy the power and spectacle of a mountain thunderstorm without apprehension.   High water During early spring and summer, run-off from melting snow can cause high water levels and swift currents in rivers and streams. Please remember that any unbridged stream crossing may be hazardous. Cross in a wide shallow spot that is not above rapids or falls. Unbuckle waist straps, use a long stick for stability, and face upstream while crossing. Don’t tie yourself in to “safety ropes”—they can drown you. Water will be extremely cold. Caution should be used to prevent conditions that may lead to hypothermia 1.    There are two known diseases carried by ticks in this area: Lyme disease and relapsing fever (borelliosis). Not all ticks carry these diseases. If you are bitten by a tick and later experience flu-like symptoms, contact your doctor and mention you had a tick bite. If you are diagnosed as having Lyme disease or relapsing fever, and you believe you got it in Yosemite, have your doctor contact the park sanitarian.   Giardia lamblia   Giardiasis is an intestinal disease caused by Giardia lamblia, a water-borne protozoan 2. Giardia is carried by humans and some domestic and wild animals. Giardia may contaminate lakes and streams. All water or melted snow must be treated by boiling for at least five minutes, using an iodine-based purifier or using a Giardia-rated water filter. Associated symptoms include chronic diarrhea, abdominal cramps, bloating, fatigue, and loss of weight. Treatment by a physician is necessary to kill the organisms.   Safety Hints   It is your responsibility to be aware of potential dangers and to take steps necessary to minimize the chance that you will become lost or injured. Let someone know your itinerary and instruct them to contact Park Service emergency personnel if you are overdue. Stay on the trail!!! In addition to causing severe erosion and damage to fragile habitat, hiking off-trail increases the potential for injury or becoming lost. When hiking with a group, keep track of each other, and wait at all trail junctions. Always carry extra food and water, rain gear, and warm clothing in case you have to spend the night out unexpectedly. If you become ill or injured on the trail and are unable to hike, send someone in your party or a passing hiker for help. Write down and give the messenger your exact location, age, gender, height, weight, and a description of your illness/injury in order to ensure the appropriate emergency response. If you become disoriented or lost, attempt to fix your location using a map, compass, and visible landmarks. If you are unable to locate the trail, stay put! Use a mirror or reflective object to signal for help. Any signal done three times in a series is a universal distress call.    1  hypothermia n.: body temperature that is below normal.   2 protozoan n.: a single-celled, microscopic organism.     Original content Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Additions and changes to the original content are the responsibility of the instructor   If you are bitten by a tick, you should __________________ .
    • A. 

      Wait to see if you have flu-like symptoms

    • B. 

      Immediately call your doctor

    • C. 

      Get hypothermia treatment

    • D. 

      Call the park health official at once

  • 15. 
    Select all the statements about folk tales and fairy tales that are TRUE.
    • A. 

      Fairy tales and folk tales are just entertainment; they don’t try to teach anything.

    • B. 

      A lost or missing object is an example of a common motif found in many fairy tales and folk tales.

    • C. 

      Different versions of these stories are passed on from generation to generation.

    • D. 

      Fairy tales and folk tales are only found in certain parts of the world.

    • E. 

      Fairy tales and folk tales are so old no one knows who the original author is.

  • 16. 
    A missing object ____________ a common motif in many folk tales.
    • A. 

      Is not

    • B. 

      Is

  • 17. 
    Identify  which word best completes the sentence  The purpose of previewing a document is to get  _________  about the information it contains.
    • A. 

      All the details

    • B. 

      A general idea

  • 18. 
    Select all the answers that are true about literary themes.   Themes ______________________.
    • A. 

      Are usually stated directly

    • B. 

      Are the ideas that the writer wants to communicate

    • C. 

      Focus on the big ideas of life

    • D. 

      Can usually be expressed in one or two words

    • E. 

      Are the same thing as subjects

    • F. 

      Can only be expressed in a complete sentence

  • 19. 
    The four basic purposes for writing are to inform, to entertain, to persuade, and to _______________.
    • A. 

      Learn more about people

    • B. 

      Gain wisdom

    • C. 

      Express feelings

  • 20. 
    Yosemite Safety   Backcountry hazards   The risks of wilderness travel or danger from accidents, wildlife, and natural phenomena must be accepted as part of the wilderness experience. Common sense and some knowledge of safe travel and camping techniques are required to protect yourself and others from harm. Be alert to the following situations:   Weather   Sudden changes in weather catch many unaware. Drenching thunderstorms can form in a matter of hours, and snow can fall at any time during the year. Be prepared for all weather conditions. Afternoon thunderstorms are a frequent and spectacular occurrence in the Yosemite wilderness. These summer storms often bring intense rain, hail, and lightning strikes, particularly in mid- to late afternoon. Plan to be over passes and away from high open areas by noon. During a storm, stay away from peaks (particularly Half Dome), ridges, caves, water, and open areas. Seek shelter in low forested areas, but avoid tall, solitary trees. By setting up camp in a safe location before lightning begins, you can enjoy the power and spectacle of a mountain thunderstorm without apprehension.   High water   During early spring and summer, run-off from melting snow can cause high water levels and swift currents in rivers and streams. Please remember that any unbridged stream crossing may be hazardous. Cross in a wide shallow spot that is not above rapids or falls. Unbuckle waist straps, use a long stick for stability, and face upstream while crossing. Don’t tie yourself in to “safety ropes”—they can drown you. Water will be extremely cold. Caution should be used to prevent conditions that may lead to hypothermia 1.    There are two known diseases carried by ticks in this area: Lyme disease and relapsing fever (borelliosis). Not all ticks carry these diseases. If you are bitten by a tick and later experience flu-like symptoms, contact your doctor and mention you had a tick bite. If you are diagnosed as having Lyme disease or relapsing fever, and you believe you got it in Yosemite, have your doctor contact the park sanitarian.   Giardia lamblia   Giardiasis is an intestinal disease caused by Giardia lamblia, a water-borne protozoan 2. Giardia is carried by humans and some domestic and wild animals. Giardia may contaminate lakes and streams. All water or melted snow must be treated by boiling for at least five minutes, using an iodine-based purifier or using a Giardia-rated water filter. Associated symptoms include chronic diarrhea, abdominal cramps, bloating, fatigue, and loss of weight. Treatment by a physician is necessary to kill the organisms.   Safety Hints   It is your responsibility to be aware of potential dangers and to take steps necessary to minimize the chance that you will become lost or injured. Let someone know your itinerary and instruct them to contact Park Service emergency personnel if you are overdue. Stay on the trail!!! In addition to causing severe erosion and damage to fragile habitat, hiking off-trail increases the potential for injury or becoming lost. When hiking with a group, keep track of each other, and wait at all trail junctions.Always carry extra food and water, rain gear, and warm clothing in case you have to spend the night out unexpectedly. If you become ill or injured on the trail and are unable to hike, send someone in your party or a passing hiker for help. Write down and give the messenger your exact location, age, gender, height, weight, and a description of your illness/injury in order to ensure the appropriate emergency response. If you become disoriented or lost, attempt to fix your location using a map, compass, and visible landmarks. If you are unable to locate the trail, stay put! Use a mirror or reflective object to signal for help. Any signal done three times in a series is a universal distress call.    1  hypothermia n.: body temperature that is below normal.   2 protozoan n.: a single-celled, microscopic organism.     Original content Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Additions and changes to the original content are the responsibility of the instructor   The hint from the article best reduces your chance of becoming lost or injured is __________________________. 
    • A. 

      Use a compass or visible landmarks to fix your location.

    • B. 

      Bring rain gear and warm clothing to wear at night.

    • C. 

      Stay on the trail where others can see you.

    • D. 

      Always carry extra food and water.

  • 21. 
    Writers are using chronological order if they present events out of sequence.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    Fantastic elements are often found in ____________.
    • A. 

      Novels

    • B. 

      Articles

    • C. 

      Biographies

    • D. 

      Folk tales

  • 23. 
    In a work of fiction, a series of events is also known as the _____________.
    • A. 

      Climax

    • B. 

      Plot

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Exposition

  • 24. 
    Shape changes can be found in many stories. Features like these are called _________________. 
    • A. 

      Motifs

    • B. 

      Resolutions

    • C. 

      Climaxes

    • D. 

      Fairy tales

  • 25. 
    Which of the following examples shows a negative perspective about dogs?
    • A. 

      Studies have shown that dogs that bite can be changed.

    • B. 

      Look into any dog’s eyes, and you will see a plea for love.

    • C. 

      Almost any dog can be trained not to jump up.

    • D. 

      I was approached by a snarling, vicious puppy

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