Brave New World Test

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 114

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Brave New World Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Helmholtz found himself in trouble with the authorities over a poem he wrote and shared with his Advanced Emotional Engineering students.  Who turned him in?
    • A. 

      Bernard Marx

    • B. 

      Benito Hoover

    • C. 

      One of his students

    • D. 

      The principal of the school

  • 2. 
    Why does the Director tell John that the citizens of the World State will not understand Othello?
    • A. 

      They no longer take literature classes in school.

    • B. 

      Othello is too old and the language and culture are too remote for them to understand.

    • C. 

      In order to have tragedy, one must have social instability.

    • D. 

      The story of Othello is too unpleasant, and they would not understand it because they would not make it to the end of the play.

  • 3. 
    Mustapha Mond explains that "the optimum population...is modelled on the iceberg..." (Huxley 223).  What does he mean?
    • A. 

      There can only be a few leaders to a majority of followers.

    • B. 

      Citizens should only know what little they need to know about their reality.

    • C. 

      If there is no social stability, society will dwindle like a melting iceberg until there is nothing left.

    • D. 

      Outsiders only see what is on the surface of their society, but in order to truly understand it, and appreciate it, you have to look deeper.

  • 4. 
    Why does Mustapha Mond say that sending Bernard Marx to an island is more of a reward than a punishment?
    • A. 

      The islanders will recondition him so that he will be able to return to society and happily fit in.

    • B. 

      There are no rules on the island, and each person is free to live as they choose.

    • C. 

      The most interesting men and women in the world live there.

    • D. 

      The island is full of beautiful scenery, unlike anything they have in the World State.

  • 5. 
    What book does Mustapha Mond show to John?
    • A. 

      The Holy Bible

    • B. 

      Beowulf

    • C. 

      Paradise Lost

    • D. 

      The Vanity of Human Wishes

  • 6. 
    John expects that he will react to the World State like ____________ did to the island in The Tempest, but he actually turns out to be more like ___________.
    • A. 

      Prospero, Miranda

    • B. 

      Miranda, the savage

    • C. 

      The savage, Miranda

    • D. 

      Miranda, Prospero

  • 7. 
    Who best serves as Bernard's foil?
    • A. 

      Lenina

    • B. 

      Benito

    • C. 

      The Controller

    • D. 

      Helmholtz

  • 8. 
    What likely inspired Huxley's Brave New World?
    • A. 

      Dictators taking over as a result of fear, anger, and uncertainty.

    • B. 

      Hitler's invasions.

    • C. 

      The Easter Rising of 1916

    • D. 

      Working class resentment after WWII

  • 9. 
    What is one thing Huxley satirizes in Brave New World?
    • A. 

      Nationalism and the British Commonwealth of Nations

    • B. 

      The British government's maltreatment of the native islanders.

    • C. 

      The Bloomsbury Group

    • D. 

      The depth of global depression

  • 10. 
    Brave New World was published in __________.
    • A. 

      1932

    • B. 

      1929

    • C. 

      1923

    • D. 

      1941

  • 11. 
    What appears to be Huxley's attitude towards communism?
    • A. 

      He feared it.

    • B. 

      He championed it.

    • C. 

      He believed it could benefit a society as long as the right leaders were in power.

    • D. 

      He had no opinion on communism.

  • 12. 
    What was a common characteristic of writers during WWI.
    • A. 

      They were optimistic about the future.

    • B. 

      They mainly wrote pro-war propaganda.

    • C. 

      They shared a profound sense of disillusionment.

    • D. 

      They mainly wrote about the horrors of war.

  • 13. 
    What genre is the novel, Brave New World?
    • A. 

      Dystopian

    • B. 

      Shilling Thriller

    • C. 

      Epistolary Novel

    • D. 

      Frame Narrative

  • 14. 
    From what perspective does Huxley write?
    • A. 

      As one who is optimistic about the future after the end of the Great War.

    • B. 

      As one who has witnessed severe changes in society throughout his lifetime, and he fears that one day his society will be unrecognizable.

    • C. 

      As a champion of communism to help remedy the global depression.

    • D. 

      He wrote the novel as pro-war propaganda piece, to scare people of the possibility of dictatorship, and to urge Great Britain to go to war.

  • 15. 
    How is the novel, Brave New World structured?
    • A. 

      Chronologically

    • B. 

      In media res

    • C. 

      Frame narrative

    • D. 

      Epistolary novel

  • 16. 
    What does Ford symbolize in Brave New World?
    • A. 

      The advancement from cars to helicopters that they use for transportation.

    • B. 

      Huxley is satirizing Christianity, arguing that deities are irrelevant.

    • C. 

      The lead controller of the World State, Ford, is god-like, so Huxley is likening dictators to deities.

    • D. 

      Huxley deifies Ford to represent the citizens commendation of mass production and consumerism.

  • 17. 
    What is the theme of Helmholtz's poem?"Yesterday's committee, Sticks, but a broken drum, Midnight in the City, Flutes in a vacuum, Shut lips, sleeping faces, Every stopped machine, The dumb and littered places Where crowds have been: … All silences rejoice, Weep (loudly or low), Speak–but with the voice Of whom, I do not know. Absence, say, of Susan's, Absence of Egeria's Arms and respective bosoms, Lips and, ah, posteriors, Slowly form a presence; Whose? and, I ask, of what So absurd an essence, That something, which is not, Nevertheless should populate Empty night more solidly Than that with which we copulate, Why should it seem so squalidly? 
    • A. 

      Courage

    • B. 

      Solitude

    • C. 

      Acceptance

    • D. 

      Loyalty

  • 18. 
    What is the tone of Helmholtz's poem?"Yesterday's committee, Sticks, but a broken drum, Midnight in the City, Flutes in a vacuum, Shut lips, sleeping faces, Every stopped machine, The dumb and littered places Where crowds have been: … All silences rejoice, Weep (loudly or low), Speak–but with the voice Of whom, I do not know. Absence, say, of Susan's, Absence of Egeria's Arms and respective bosoms, Lips and, ah, posteriors, Slowly form a presence; Whose? and, I ask, of what So absurd an essence, That something, which is not, Nevertheless should populate Empty night more solidly Than that with which we copulate, Why should it seem so squalidly? 
    • A. 

      Elation

    • B. 

      Melancholy

    • C. 

      Caustic

    • D. 

      Mocking

  • 19. 
    What is the meaning of the italicized text?"Yesterday's committee, Sticks, but a broken drum, Midnight in the City, Flutes in a vacuum, Shut lips, sleeping faces, Every stopped machine, The dumb and littered places Where crowds have been: … All silences rejoice, Weep (loudly or low), Speak–but with the voice Of whom, I do not know. Absence, say, of Susan's, Absence of Egeria's Arms and respective bosoms, Lips and, ah, posteriors, Slowly form a presence; Whose? and, I ask, of what So absurd an essence, That something, which is not, Nevertheless should populate Empty night more solidly Than that with which we copulate, Why should it seem so squalidly? 
    • A. 

      The World State's culture seems absurd to him.

    • B. 

      An unknown presence makes Helmholtz feel as though having sex is dirty.

    • C. 

      The unknown essence that penetrates the night seems squalid.

    • D. 

      The empty night is populated with copulating couples.

  • 20. 
    What type of rhyme does the poem use?"Yesterday's committee, Sticks, but a broken drum, Midnight in the City, Flutes in a vacuum, Shut lips, sleeping faces, Every stopped machine, The dumb and littered places Where crowds have been: … All silences rejoice, Weep (loudly or low), Speak–but with the voice Of whom, I do not know. Absence, say, of Susan's, Absence of Egeria's Arms and respective bosoms, Lips and, ah, posteriors, Slowly form a presence; Whose? and, I ask, of what So absurd an essence, That something, which is not, Nevertheless should populate Empty night more solidly Than that with which we copulate, Why should it seem so squalidly? 
    • A. 

      End rhyme

    • B. 

      Internal rhyme

    • C. 

      Rich rhyme

    • D. 

      Identical rhyme

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