Many, Much, Any, A Lot Of ETC. - Quiz #2

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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 113
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 113

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    01. I would like _____ cheese, please.

    • A.

      Any

    • B.

      Some

    • C.

      A few

    • D.

      Many

    Correct Answer
    B. Some
    Explanation
    In the test sentence 'l would like _____ cheese, please.' we need to choose a quantifier for the uncountable noun 'chees’.
    'A few' (instead of 'some' when we talk about a small number) and 'many' ('a large number of') are used with plural countable nouns:
    a few days, a few questions, a few friends;
    I don't have many dresses.

    The quantifiers 'any' and 'some' as determiners can be used before both countable and uncountable nouns. When using 'some' or 'any', the exact number is not stated.
    We use 'any' in questions and negatives to mean 'some' with countable and uncountable nouns:
    Did you buy any butter?
    We haven't got any eggs. We also use 'any' to mean 'it does not matter which or what' to describe something which is not limited: You can choose any colours you want.; She refused to answer any questions. We use this meaning of 'any' with all types of nouns and usually in affirmative sentences.

    We use 'some' to refer to indefinite quantities: some snow, some people. 'Some' is used in positive
    sentences (l drink some coffee every morning.; I would like some coffee.) and in questions when we are offering something (Would you like some mango ice-cream?) or when we are making a request (Can I buy some ice-cream?). In polite requests 'I'd like some + noun' we use the quantifier 'some' if we mean indefinite quantities: I'd like some coffee, please.
    Therefore, we are to choose ANSWER B ('some'): 'l would like some cheese, please.' [l don't know exactly how much, but I mean a certain amount of cheese, probably some slices or a cheese plate. I don't want all the cheese in the world].

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  • 2. 

    02. Alex, I hope you'll tell me _____ good.

    • A.

      Something

    • B.

      Anything

    • C.

      Some

    • D.

      Someone

    Correct Answer
    A. Something
    Explanation
    Something, anything, some, someone etc. are indefinite pronouns. We use them to talk about a person, thing or place, when we don't know who or what they are, or it is not important. We use such pronouns ending in -body or -one for people, and pronouns ending in -thing for things.
    In the test sentence 'Alex, I hope you'll tell me _____ good.'
    The speaker refers to some good information — a thing, not a person: you'll tell me what?. Therefore, we cannot use 'someone' here. We can use 'some' here neither as a determiner, because there is no noun after it, nor as a pronoun because after it the adjective 'good' is given without any noun. It could be possible to use 'some' here, if there was the noun 'news' after the adjective 'good':
    I hope you'll tell me some good news. The indefinite pronoun anything can be used in affirmative sentences with a meaning that is close to every-: whichever person, whichever place, whichever thing, etc. (l can do anything for you).
    But in this sentence the speaker does not mean 'any/whichever information', not any news, but he or she means good news. 'Anything' can be used in the question: Could you tell me anything good? Thus, the speaker refers to a thing about which he or she knows nothing, and the sentence is affirmative that is why we choose ANSWER A 'something' — 'an object, situation, quality that is not exactly known or stated'.

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  • 3. 

    03. Kate doesn't have _____ knowledge at Maths. 

    • A.

      Some

    • B.

      A few

    • C.

      Many

    • D.

      Much

    Correct Answer
    D. Much
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "much" because it indicates a large amount of knowledge, which is the opposite of what is being described in the sentence. The other options ("some," "a few," and "many") suggest at least some level of knowledge, whereas "much" implies a lack of knowledge in this context.

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  • 4. 

    04. I don't receive _____ letters from him.

    • A.

      No

    • B.

      Many

    • C.

      Much

    • D.

      A little

    Correct Answer
    B. Many
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "many" because the sentence indicates that the person does not receive a large number of letters from him. "No" would imply that the person does not receive any letters, "much" would imply a large amount of letters, and "a little" would imply a small amount of letters.

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  • 5. 

     05. I don't read _____ newspapers at all.

    • A.

      Any

    • B.

      A lot of

    • C.

      Many

    • D.

      Some

    Correct Answer
    A. Any
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "any". This is because the sentence suggests that the person does not read any newspapers at all, indicating a lack of preference or selection. The word "any" is used to refer to an indefinite quantity or amount, which fits the context of the sentence.

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  • 6. 

    06. I haven't heard _____ news about him for a long time.

    • A.

      Any

    • B.

      Some

    • C.

      A few

    • D.

      Many

    Correct Answer
    A. Any
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "any" because it is used in negative sentences to indicate that there is no news about him. It suggests that there has been a lack of information or updates regarding him for a long time.

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  • 7. 

    07. I've heard _____. I think we are not alone in the house.

    • A.

      Anything

    • B.

      Something

    • C.

      Some

    • D.

      Any

    Correct Answer
    B. Something
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "something" because it implies that the speaker has heard a specific noise or sound that makes them believe there is another presence in the house. "Anything" and "some" are too vague and do not convey the same level of certainty as "something." "Any" is incorrect because it is used in negative sentences or questions, and in this case, the speaker is expressing a belief rather than uncertainty.

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  • 8. 

    08. We didn't have _____ success with that task.

    • A.

      Many

    • B.

      A few

    • C.

      Some

    • D.

      Much

    Correct Answer
    D. Much
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "much" because it is used to describe uncountable nouns, such as "success." In this sentence, the speaker is indicating that they did not have a significant amount of success with the task. The other options, "many," "a few," and "some," are used to describe countable nouns and would not be appropriate in this context.

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  • 9. 

    09.  There are _____ cats on the bench.

    • A.

      Many

    • B.

      Much

    • C.

      A little

    • D.

      Any

    Correct Answer
    A. Many
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "many" because "many" is used to refer to a large number of countable nouns, such as cats. In this case, the sentence is asking about the number of cats on the bench, so "many" is the appropriate word to use.

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  • 10. 

    10. We've seen _____ animals in the zoo today.

    • A.

      Much

    • B.

      A little

    • C.

      A lot of

    • D.

      Any

    Correct Answer
    C. A lot of
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "a lot of" because it implies a large quantity or number of animals seen in the zoo. It suggests that the person has seen numerous animals, indicating a significant amount.

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