English 28 Police Report Writing

100 Questions | Total Attempts: 97

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English Quizzes & Trivia

Answer the following questions. Read instructions carefully. God Bless! :)


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      They demonstrate officers’ professionalism

    • B. 

      They provide clues for follow-up investigations

    • C. 

      They provide data for statistical studies

    • D. 

      They help justify arrests or disciplinary actions

  • 2. 
    Your report may be read by
    • A. 

      Your supervisor

    • B. 

      A newspaper reporter

    • C. 

      An attorney

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      The name of your supervisor

    • B. 

      The name and address of a close relative for each witness

    • C. 

      The reason you were at the location

    • D. 

      A brief description of the weather at the time of the incident

  • 4. 
    The preparation stage of report writing includes
    • A. 

      Interviewing

    • B. 

      Outlining your report

    • C. 

      Investigating

    • D. 

      A and c

  • 5. 
    The drafting stage of report writing includes
    • A. 

      Organizing your information

    • B. 

      Spellchecking words you’re unsure of

    • C. 

      Investigating

    • D. 

      A and c

  • 6. 
    The revising stage of report writing includes
    • A. 

      Taking notes

    • B. 

      Spellchecking words you’re unsure of

    • C. 

      Verifying information

    • D. 

      B and c

  • 7. 
    • A. 

      Memorize witnesses’ names and addresses

    • B. 

      Insert opinions and hunches

    • C. 

      Blend two sets of stories

    • D. 

      Predict the outcome of an investigation

  • 8. 
    The practice of identifying people at the scene as Witness 1, Witness 2, and so on is
    • A. 

      A good way to ensure objectivity

    • B. 

      A good way to ensure accuracy

    • C. 

      Helpful later when you’re preparing to testify in court

    • D. 

      Not recommended by your book

  • 9. 
    Suppose you searched an inmate’s locker for contraband without finding anything suspicious. You should
    • A. 

      Write a report

    • B. 

      Not waste time writing a report

    • C. 

      Ask your supervisor for advice

    • D. 

      Recheck the list of contraband items to see what you might have missed

  • 10. 
    Suppose you look for footprints at a crime scene without finding any. Your report should
    • A. 

      State that you looked for footprints

    • B. 

      State that you looked for footprints but didn’t find any

    • C. 

      State why you thought there might be footprints at the scene

    • D. 

      Omit any mention of footprints

  • 11. 
    • A. 

      Victims

    • B. 

      Emotions

    • C. 

      Suspects

    • D. 

      Yourself

  • 12. 
    • A. 

      A waste of time

    • B. 

      Inappropriate

    • C. 

      Useful for further investigation

    • D. 

      Unprofessional

  • 13. 
    Dealing with a victim’s emotions
    • A. 

      Should be done first

    • B. 

      Should be avoided

    • C. 

      Is beyond the scope of an officer’s duties

    • D. 

      Is unprofessional

  • 14. 
    Using quotation marks when you’re taking notes
    • A. 

      Is unprofessional

    • B. 

      Can create confusion when you’re writing your report

    • C. 

      Can be helpful in identifying someone’s exact words later

    • D. 

      Casts doubt upon your objectivity

  • 15. 
    • A. 

      The officer looks unprofessional

    • B. 

      The officer looks uneducated

    • C. 

      The officer is wasting time

    • D. 

      Explanations of unfamiliar words and phrases may be needed

  • 16. 
    Establishing probable cause is especially important in a
    • A. 

      Type 1 report

    • B. 

      Type 2 report

    • C. 

      Type 3 report

    • D. 

      Type 4 report

  • 17. 
    • A. 

      Point of entry or exit

    • B. 

      Your theory about how the crime was committed

    • C. 

      Signs of trauma

    • D. 

      Steps taken to secure the crime scene

  • 18. 
    • A. 

      Who did the interviews

    • B. 

      Assurances that they did not get in each other’s way

    • C. 

      Evidence that they are an effective team

    • D. 

      Which officer took the lead

  • 19. 
    Controlling an interview with a witness
    • A. 

      Is insensitive

    • B. 

      Is sometimes necessary

    • C. 

      Requires permission from a supervisor

    • D. 

      Can cause you to be charged with misconduct

  • 20. 
    Carrying a small notebook in a pocket
    • A. 

      Can damage your uniform

    • B. 

      Requires permission from a supervisor

    • C. 

      Can be helpful in an emergency

    • D. 

      Is not a recommended practice

  • 21. 
    Writing the terms “Victim 1, Victim 2” instead of actual names
    • A. 

      Testifies to your professionalism

    • B. 

      Ensures objectivity

    • C. 

      Can cause confusion

    • D. 

      Makes reports read smoothly

  • 22. 
    The events that happened at a crime scene are
    • A. 

      Recorded in the narrative

    • B. 

      Recorded in the disposition

    • C. 

      Not written down unless there’s a possibility of confusion later

    • D. 

      Left to your supervisor to record

  • 23. 
    If you’re using a printed form or a computer template to write your report, you probably
    • A. 

      Won’t need a narrative

    • B. 

      Won’t need an opening sentence

    • C. 

      Won’t have to establish probable cause

    • D. 

      Don’t need to be concerned about completeness

  • 24. 
    According to your book, the “5W” questions can be help you to
    • A. 

      Remember who was at a crime scene

    • B. 

      Remind you why became an officer in the first place

    • C. 

      Handle flashbacks in a report

    • D. 

      Establish probable cause

  • 25. 
    In a report, flashbacks
    • A. 

      Are an issue with users of illegal substances

    • B. 

      Are jumps backward and forward in time

    • C. 

      Are moments when the officer remembers something that needs to be reported

    • D. 

      Are memories of previous crime scenes

  • 26. 
    • A. 

      Use a separate paragraph for each witness

    • B. 

      Record only the story that seems most credible

    • C. 

      Combine all the witness stories in one paragraph

    • D. 

      Ask a supervisor how to handle the contradictions

  • 27. 
    A report about a domestic dispute
    • A. 

      Is likely to include events that happened before the officer arrived

    • B. 

      Is likely to include contradictory stories

    • C. 

      Is likely to require interviews

    • D. 

      All the above

  • 28. 
    Categories like yourself, witnesses, and evidence
    • A. 

      Make good headings for a report

    • B. 

      Are thinking tools

    • C. 

      Are rarely useful to officers

    • D. 

      Don’t reflect the realities of what you’re likely to encounter at a crime scene

  • 29. 
    A narrative is
    • A. 

      A police report

    • B. 

      A fabrication

    • C. 

      A story

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 30. 
    Calling an ambulance belongs to which of the six categories?
    • A. 

      Narrative

    • B. 

      Victims

    • C. 

      Disposition

    • D. 

      Evidence

  • 31. 
    Probable cause is particularly important in
    • A. 

      All reports

    • B. 

      Type 1

    • C. 

      Type 3

    • D. 

      Type 4

  • 32. 
    In Type 1 situations, the officer may not have to
    • A. 

      Establish probable cause

    • B. 

      File charges

    • C. 

      Collect evidence

    • D. 

      A, b, and c

  • 33. 
    • A. 

      The officer performs an investigation

    • B. 

      Probable cause is usually an issue

    • C. 

      The officer intervenes in the situation

    • D. 

      The officer sets the case in motion

  • 34. 
    • A. 

      The officer performs an investigation

    • B. 

      Probable cause is usually an issue

    • C. 

      The officer intervenes in the situation

    • D. 

      The officer sets the case in motion

  • 35. 
    • A. 

      Probable cause is an issue

    • B. 

      Will be filed

    • C. 

      A citizen called 911 for assistance

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 36. 
    • A. 

      Witnesses and suspects may tell conflicting stories

    • B. 

      No charges

    • C. 

      The officer must explain why he or she was at the scene

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 37. 
    In a Type 2 situation, officers should
    • A. 

      Establish probable cause

    • B. 

      Include the results of the investigations, even if nothing is found

    • C. 

      Describe only investigations that yielded results

    • D. 

      Intervene to settle the conflict

  • 38. 
    In a type 3 situation, an officer will
    • A. 

      Look, listen, and write

    • B. 

      Look, listen, write, and investigate

    • C. 

      Look, listen, write, investigate, and intervene

    • D. 

      Set the case in motion

  • 39. 
    In a type 4 situation, an officer will
    • A. 

      Look, listen, and write

    • B. 

      Look, listen, write, and investigate

    • C. 

      Look, listen, write, investigate, and intervene

    • D. 

      Set the case in motion

  • 40. 
    Understanding the four types of reports
    • A. 

      Is required by statute

    • B. 

      Ensures that officers will handle a situation professionally

    • C. 

      Helps officers focus on what should be included in each type of report

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 41. 
    • A. 

      Seemed

    • B. 

      Carried

    • C. 

      Said

    • D. 

      Grabbed

  • 42. 
    • A. 

      Old

    • B. 

      Confused

    • C. 

      Gray

    • D. 

      Slowly

  • 43. 
    Objectivity is ensured by
    • A. 

      Using expressions like Victim 1 and Victim 2

    • B. 

      Constantly monitoring your thoughts and reactions

    • C. 

      Avoiding “I” and “me” when referring to yourself

    • D. 

      An officer’s age and experience

  • 44. 
    • A. 

      Obviously

    • B. 

      disrespectful

    • C. 

      Failed

    • D. 

      Aggressive

  • 45. 
    Applying labels like “crazy” and “sexy” in a report can
    • A. 

      Be a timesaver when you’re preparing for court

    • B. 

      Cause a defense attorney to challenge you

    • C. 

      Make you look insensitive

    • D. 

      B and c

  • 46. 
    • A. 

      A hunch

    • B. 

      A guess

    • C. 

      An action

    • D. 

      A prediction

  • 47. 
    • A. 

      Jones was obviously drunk

    • B. 

      Jones had clearly been drinking too much alcohol

    • C. 

      Jones stumbled

    • D. 

      Jones sounded inebriated when he tried to answer my questions

  • 48. 
    Describing a woman as a “bombshell” or “sexpot” is
    • A. 

      Never appropriate

    • B. 

      Acceptable if the woman really fits the description

    • C. 

      Acceptable if the woman is involved in a sex-related profession

    • D. 

      Acceptable if you’re quoting someone’s exact words

  • 49. 
    A synonym for objective is
    • A. 

      Descriptive

    • B. 

      Sensitive

    • C. 

      Professional

    • D. 

      Factua

  • 50. 
    • A. 

      Paine said, “My husband had been acting strangely since he came home from the party.”

    • B. 

      I looked down the alley and saw a man who was acting strangely.

    • C. 

      Strangely enough, no jewelry was missing from the display case.

    • D. 

      A and c

  • 51. 
    Put a check in the box of every statement that’s appropriate for a report. Leave the box a blank if statement is not appropriate.
    • A. 

      Inmate Jones told me, “I ain’t gonna spend no more time in confinement, that’s for sure.”

    • B. 

      I asked Portnov for his driver’s license and registration.

    • C. 

      Officer Tallis put the handcuffs on Jantzen’s wrists, and I Mirandized her.

    • D. 

      This officer found a steak knife under a pillow in the bedroom.

  • 52. 
    Put a check in the box of every statement that’s appropriate for a report. Leave the box a blank if statement is not appropriate.
    • A. 

      Because I thought Wong was probably telling the truth, I did not arrest him.

    • B. 

      I checked the carpet for footprints, but I didn't find any.

    • C. 

      Linton tried to answer my questions, but his responses didn’t make sense, so I decided to administer a sobriety test.

  • 53. 
    Put a check in the box of every statement that’s appropriate for a report. Leave the box a blank if statement is not appropriate.
    • A. 

      Patel cursed and swore when I asked him about his wife’s accusations.

    • B. 

      Feeling that the interview with Miller was going nowhere, I began to question his administrative assistant.

    • C. 

      Everything in the master bedroom was neat and orderly, the bureau drawers were closed and the bed was made.

  • 54. 
    Put a check in the box of each sentence that effectively records what a person said. Leave box with ineffective sentences a blank.
    • A. 

      The chaplain expressed concern about Talley’s emotional state.

    • B. 

      “I don’t know how that idea got into your fool head,” said Zeiger.

    • C. 

      There ain’t nobody can say I had a damn thing to do with the missing money Dooley told me.

  • 55. 
    Put a check in the box of each sentence that effectively records what a person said. Leave box with ineffective sentences a blank.
    • A. 

      “I don’t care nothin’ about what you want me to do,” said Inmate Tompkins.

    • B. 

      He was in the garage looking for a rake when seemingly he heard the shots.

    • C. 

      Paul kept changing his story when I asked him about the accident.

  • 56. 
    Put a check in the box of each sentence that effectively records what a person said. Leave box with ineffective sentences a blank.
    • A. 

      Price gave several explanations for his whereabouts during the time of the break-in.

    • B. 

      Swenson evaded my questions about the events that morning.

    • C. 

      Harper said she hasn't made up her mind about pressing a charge yet.

    • D. 

      Jacobs agreed with his wife’s description of the intruder.

  • 57. 
    On-the-job learning
    • A. 

      Is unprofessional

    • B. 

      Can teach you lessons not taught in a classroom

    • C. 

      Can trap you in outdated “the way we’ve always done it” practices

    • D. 

      B and c

  • 58. 
    Criminal justice reports
    • A. 

      Have not changed over the years

    • B. 

      Evolve as officers adapt to new technology

    • C. 

      Require passive voice for objectivity

    • D. 

      B and c

  • 59. 
    Personal pronouns
    • A. 

      Should be avoided in reports unless you’re quoting someone’s exact words

    • B. 

      Are always unprofessional

    • C. 

      Save time and help officers avoid confusion

    • D. 

      Can compromise an officer’s objectivity if not used carefully

  • 60. 
    Words like respective and individual
    • A. 

      Bring a professional tone to criminal justice reports

    • B. 

      Should be avoided unless you’re sure you can spell them correctly

    • C. 

      Save time

    • D. 

      Are often unnecessary

  • 61. 
    Bullet style
    • A. 

      Saves time

    • B. 

      Is a complicated way to organize information

    • C. 

      Should be used sparingly

    • D. 

      A and c

  • 62. 
    The headings in bullet style
    • A. 

      Should be memorized

    • B. 

      Should be the same in every report

    • C. 

      Can help you organize your thoughts

    • D. 

      A, b, and c

  • 63. 
    • A. 

      These items

    • B. 

      The following

    • C. 

      I saw

    • D. 

      A,b, and c

  • 64. 
    Bullet style
    • A. 

      Has always been a feature of criminal justice reports

    • B. 

      Has become popular in recent years

    • C. 

      Compromises an officer’s integrity

    • D. 

      Should be used only when an officer has fired a weapon at the scene

  • 65. 
    Use labels like “victim” or “suspect,” in writing your police report
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 66. 
    A suspect attempted, tried, intended, or planned to do a particular action is a general report.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 67. 
    Words like upset, enraged, scared, nervous, and disturbed are important for a criminal justice report.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 68. 
    Keep a small notebook in a pocket, along with a couple of pens, just in case you need it.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 69. 
    You can rely on your memory to add details later.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 70. 
    Hearsay is permissible in criminal justice reports.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 71. 
    Do not record slang and bad language, because it sounds unprofessional.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 72. 
    "How did you get involved? Were you dispatched, or did you observe something suspicious?" are important questions to answer in making your report.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 73. 
    Disposition refers to the emotions undergone by witnesses and victims.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 74. 
    Subjective (factual) reports make you look professional.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 75. 
    • A. 

      Accuracy

    • B. 

      Brevity

    • C. 

      Completeness

    • D. 

      Subjectivity

  • 76. 
    • A. 

      Use names.

    • B. 

      Generalize.

    • C. 

      Be efficient.

    • D. 

      Be professional.

  • 77. 
    • A. 

      "I"

    • B. 

      victims

    • C. 

      Witnesses

    • D. 

      Suspects

  • 78. 
    • A. 

      Point of entry or exit

    • B. 

      Missing or damaged items

    • C. 

      Vehicular damage

    • D. 

      Documention

  • 79. 
    • A. 

      Names

    • B. 

      The Narrative

    • C. 

      The Last Sentence

    • D. 

      Disposition

  • 80. 
    • A. 

      Write an opening sentence.

    • B. 

      Write a paragraph describing your leaving of the scene.

    • C. 

      Write a paragraph describing what happened while you were there.

    • D. 

      Write a concluding paragraph.

  • 81. 
    • A. 

      Type 1

    • B. 

      Type B

    • C. 

      Type 3

    • D. 

      Type 4

  • 82. 
    • A. 

      Use boy and girl only to refer to children.

    • B. 

      Do not use street slang for minorities or disabled persons.

    • C. 

      Do not use sexually charged language to refer to women (broad, stacked, bombshell, etc.)

    • D. 

      Use vulgar language

  • 83. 
    • A. 

      Passive voice

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Repetition

    • D. 

      Quotation

  • 84. 
    • A. 

      Editorialize

    • B. 

      Be specific.

    • C. 

      Shy away from writing down slang, blasphemy, indecent words, and racial slurs.

    • D. 

      Memorize.

  • 85. 
    Dealing with a victim’s emotions
    • A. 

      Is not part of an officer’s job

    • B. 

      Should usually be the first step in an interview

    • C. 

      Should be done only after all the facts are recorded

    • D. 

      Is rarely necessary

  • 86. 
    “Chain of custody”
    • A. 

      Refers to transporting a suspect

    • B. 

      Refers to filing a report

    • C. 

      Refers to evidence taken at the scene

    • D. 

      Does not need to be recorded in a report

  • 87. 
    Having extra paper and pens in a pocket
    • A. 

      May be helpful in an emergency

    • B. 

      Is unprofessional

    • C. 

      Violates most agency’s regulations

    • D. 

      May damage an officer’s uniform

  • 88. 
    • A. 

      Results of a sobriety test

    • B. 

      Vehicular damage

    • C. 

      Point of entry

    • D. 

      The officer’s theories about how and why the crime was committed

  • 89. 
    Slang
    • A. 

      Has no place in a report

    • B. 

      May require a definition if it’s unfamiliar

    • C. 

      Should be used only if it’s grammatical

    • D. 

      Should be used only if it’s easily understood

  • 90. 
    The following paragraph was changed into bullet style below: Alcee Wright told me woke up and heard men’s voices. He wasn’t sure where the voices were coming from, but they seemed close. He didn’t know how many voices there were. He was frightened and called 911 from his bedroom phone. Which of the following sentences do not belong?
    • A. 

      woke up and heard men’s voices

    • B. 

      Wasn’t sure where the voices were coming from

    • C. 

      Wright thought they were close and was scared

    • D. 

      didn’t know how many voices there were

    • E. 

      was frightened and called 911 from his bedroom phone.

  • 91. 
    The following paragraph was changed into bullet style below: Marcia Sadowski said she last saw her daughter at about 5:30 Wednesday evening. Marcia was cooking dinner and asked Lucy to set the table. Marcia and Lucy had been arguing about Lucy’s grades in school. Lucy took four dinner plates out of a kitchen cabinet and put them on the dining room table. Then Lucy threw one of the plates at the wall. The next thing Marcia heard was a slam from the front door. Marcia ran to the door, opened it, and looked out, but Lucy was nowhere in sight. Which of the following sentences do not belong?
    • A. 

      Marcia Sadowski told me: she last saw her daughter at about 5:30 Wednesday evening

    • B. 

      According to Marcia, Lucy did the following: took four dinner plates out of a kitchen cabinet

    • C. 

      Marcia told me that next she: heard the front door slam

    • D. 

      Lucy said she didn’t' throw any of the plates at the wall.

  • 92. 
    The crowd outside City Hall looked angry, however they listened quietly while the mayor spoke.
    • A. 

      Angry, however

    • B. 

      Angry. However

    • C. 

      Angry, however

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 93. 
    Because Mrs. Katros doesn't speak english, I requested a translator.
    • A. 

      English,

    • B. 

      English;

    • C. 

      English,

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 94. 
    The church was quite and dark when I pulled into the parking lot.
    • A. 

      Quite and

    • B. 

      Quiet and

    • C. 

      Quite, and

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 95. 
    • A. 

      Loose

    • B. 

      Loss

    • C. 

      Lose

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 96. 
    Sharon Lane knows more about the problems in the neighborhood than him.
    • A. 

      Than him

    • B. 

      Than he

    • C. 

      Hen him

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 97. 
    Chief Rodriguez asked Karen Havlak and me to attend the accreditation meeting.
    • A. 

      And me

    • B. 

      And I

    • C. 

      An I

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 98. 
    Both my Uncle Tim and my Grandfather were police officers.
    • A. 

      My Grandfather

    • B. 

      My Grandfather

    • C. 

      My grandfather

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 99. 
    The childrens mother did not return for an hour.
    • A. 

      Childrens mother

    • B. 

      Childrens' mother

    • C. 

      Children's mother

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 100. 
    I tried the door, it was locked.
    • A. 

      Door, it

    • B. 

      Door; it

    • C. 

      Door; It

    • D. 

      None of the above.