11 & 12 Grade English Midterm

97 Questions | Total Attempts: 60

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11 & 12 Grade English Midterm

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A repetition of sentences using the same structure.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Parallel Structure

    • C. 

      Aphorism

    • D. 

      Pastoral

  • 2. 
    The structure of a story; the sequence of events in a story; includes the exposition, rising action, the climax, the falling action, and the resolution.
    • A. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Plot

  • 3. 
    The emotional content of a word.
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Figurative Language

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 4. 
    The dictionary definition of a word.
    • A. 

      Conotation

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 5. 
    A mild word or phrase which substitues for another which would be undesirable because it is too direct, unpleasant, or offensive.
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Genre

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Picaresque Novel

  • 6. 
    The result of an action is the reverse of what the actor expected.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Situational Irony

    • C. 

      Postmodernism

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

  • 7. 
    The audience knows something that the characters in the drama do not.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Bildungsroman

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Dramatic Irony

  • 8. 
    The contrast is between the literal meaning of what is said and what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verbal Irony

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 9. 
    The use of angry and insulting language.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Invective

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 10. 
    Pervasive irony created by a structural feature such as a naive protagonist whose viewpoint is consistently wrong, shared by neither author nor reader is known as this.
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Myth

    • C. 

      Structural Irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 11. 
    A figure os speech wherein a comparison is made between two unlike quantities without the use of the words "like" or "as."
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 12. 
    The hero or central character of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Literary Theory

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 13. 
    A device in literature where an object represents an idea.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Parody

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Theme

  • 14. 
    A statement which lessens or minimizes the importance of what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verisimilitude

    • B. 

      Understatement

    • C. 

      Colloquialism

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 15. 
    An author's choice of words.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Syntax

    • D. 

      Genre

  • 16. 
    Unintentional use of an inappropriate word similar in sound to the appropriate word, often with humorous effect.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Modernism

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 17. 
    A play on words wherein a word is used to convey two meanings at the same time.
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 18. 
    A literary style in which one's thoughts and feelings are depicted in a continuous and uninterrupted flow.
    • A. 

      Stream of Consciousness

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Sonnet

    • D. 

      Soliloquy

  • 19. 
    Language that is native to people (as opposed to learned language) and is used as everyday speech.
    • A. 

      Jarg

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Figure of Speech

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 20. 
    A writer creates unreal characters and situations and asks the reader to pretend that they are real in a fictional work.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 21. 
    A reference in one literary work to a character or theme found in another literary work.
    • A. 

      Analogy

    • B. 

      Apostrophe

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Bildungsroman

  • 22. 
    The method a writer uses to reveal the personality of a character in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Characterization

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 23. 
    Characters that do not change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 24. 
    Characters wiht only one dominant trait or aspect, such as greed or anger.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 25. 
    Characters that change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 26. 
    Characters that have many traits or aspects to their personality.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 27. 
    A movement that stressed the presentation of life as it is, without embellishment or idealization in literature.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 28. 
    A movement or tendency in art, music, and literature to retain the characteristics found in work originating in classical Greece and Rome.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 29. 
    A brief quotation whcih appears at the beginning of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Epigraph

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 30. 
    A major work dealing with an important theme, generally in literature.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Epigraph

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 31. 
    An overused expression.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Pun

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Cliché

  • 32. 
    Systematic study of the nature of literature and the methods for analyzing literature.
    • A. 

      In Medias Res

    • B. 

      Hamartia

    • C. 

      Hubris

    • D. 

      Literary Theory

  • 33. 
    A moment when a character is alone and speaks his or her thoughs aloud.
    • A. 

      Synechdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 34. 
    A figure os speech in which a word represents something else which it suggests.
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 35. 
    An unverifiable story based on a religious belief.
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 36. 
    Expresses the author's attitude toward his or her subject.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 37. 
    The author's use of figurative language, diction, sound effects and other literary devices.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 38. 
    The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 39. 
    An ingredient of a literary work which gives the work unity.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 40. 
    A situation or a statement that seems to contradict itself, but on closer inspection, does not.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 41. 
    A combination of contradictory terms.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 42. 
    A literary device wherein something nonhuman found in nature - a beast, plant, stream, natural force, etc. - performs as though from human feeling or motivation.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 43. 
    A literary work that imitates the style of another literary work.
    • A. 

      Paradox

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Parody

  • 44. 
    Fictional genre with a setting in the Southern United States that vests its stories with foreboding and grotesquerie.
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Picaresque Novel

    • D. 

      Stream of Consciousness

  • 45. 
    The way words are put together to form phrases, clauses, and sentences.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Syntax

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Diction

  • 46. 
    Comparison of two things that are alike in some respects.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 47. 
    A character in a play who sets off the main character or other characters by comparison.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 48. 
    A literary type or form.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 49. 
    A way of saying one thing and meaning something else in literature.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Figurative Language

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 50. 
    A figure of speech wherein the speaker speaks directly to something nonhuman.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Figurative Language

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 51. 
    Vocabulary understood by members of a profession or trade but usually not by other members of the general public.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Vernacular

    • D. 

      Invective

  • 52. 
    A distinctive feature or repeated theme or idea in a piece of literature.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Vernacular

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Invective

  • 53. 
    A figure of speech whcih takes the form of a comparison between two unlike quantities for which a basis for comparison can be found, and which uses the words "like" or "as" in the comparison.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Point of View

  • 54. 
    The eyes through which a story is told; a piece of literature contains a speaker who is speaking in either the first person, telling things from his or her own perspective, in the third person, or telling things from he perspective of an onlooker.
    • A. 

      Point of View

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Naturalism

    • D. 

      Nihilism

  • 55. 
    A figure of speech in which something nonhuman is given human characteristics.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Nihilism

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 56. 
    A word or group of words in a literary work which appeal to one or more of the senses: sight, taste, touch, hearing, and smell.
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Narrator

  • 57. 
    A figure of speech in which an overstatement or exaggeration occurs.
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Narrator

  • 58. 
    A judgment based on reasoning rather than on direct or explicit statement. A conclusion based on facts or circumstances.
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Narrator

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 59. 
    The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Inference

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Imagery

  • 60. 
    Placing of two items side by side to create a certain effect, reveal an attitude, or accomplish some other purpose.
    • A. 

      Juxtaposition

    • B. 

      Romanticism

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Short Story

  • 61. 
    A piece of literature designed ro ridicule the subject of the work.
    • A. 

      Juxtaposition

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Short Story

    • D. 

      Romanticism

  • 62. 
    A short fictional narrative.
    • A. 

      Romanticism

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Short Story

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 63. 
    A movement that championed imagination and emotions as more powerful than reason and systematic thinking in literature.
    • A. 

      Short Story

    • B. 

      Juxtaposition

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Romanticism

  • 64. 
    Select the word grouping that best describes Poe's writing. 
    • A. 

      Cheery, light, comedic

    • B. 

      Murder, bizarre, mysterious

    • C. 

      Nature, rural, realistic

  • 65. 
    Select the correct title to which this passage belongs: 'And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you'- here I opened wide the door;- Darkness there, and nothing more."
    • A. 

      "The Masque of the Red Death"

    • B. 

      "The Tell-Tale Heart"

    • C. 

      "The Raven"

  • 66. 
    Poe is known for being the inventor of the modern detective story and an innovator in the science fiction genre. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 67. 
    Select the correct title to which this passage belongs: "Presently I heard a slight groan, and I knew it was the groan of mortal terror. It was not a groan of pain or of grief --oh, no! --it was the low stifled sound that arises from the bottom of the soul when overcharged with awe. I knew the sound well. Many a night, just at midnight, when all the world slept, it has welled up from my own bosom, deepening, with its dreadful echo, the terrors that distracted me."
    • A. 

      "The Tell-Tale Heart"

    • B. 

      "The Cask of Amontillado"

    • C. 

      "The Fall of the House of Usher"

  • 68. 
    What word means the systematic and planned extermination of an entire national, racial, political, or ethnic group?
    • A. 

      Holocaust

    • B. 

      Genocide

    • C. 

      Pogrom

    • D. 

      Fascism

  • 69. 
    What word means total destruction?
    • A. 

      Annihilation

    • B. 

      Genocide

    • C. 

      Holocaust

    • D. 

      Fascism

  • 70. 
    What word means ill-feeling or hatred toward Jews?
    • A. 

      annihilation

    • B. 

      Prejudice

    • C. 

      Anti-Semitism

    • D. 

      genocide

  • 71. 
    What word means an irrational hatred of a person, group, or race based upon a preconceived opinion or judgment?
    • A. 

      Annihilation

    • B. 

      Prejudice

    • C. 

      anti-Semitism

    • D. 

      genocide

  • 72. 
    In what point of view was the book Night written?
    • A. 

      First person

    • B. 

      Second person

    • C. 

      Third limited

    • D. 

      Third omniscient

  • 73. 
    What did Elie Wiesel want to study at the beginning of the book?
    • A. 

      beadle

    • B. 

      Geometry

    • C. 

      Cabbala

    • D. 

      Russian

  • 74. 
    Madame Schatcher’s visions about fire are an example of what?
    • A. 

      foreshadowing

    • B. 

      irony

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 75. 
    “It was like a page torn from some storybook,” is an example of what?
    • A. 

      Foreshadowing

    • B. 

      irony

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 76. 
    “Everywhere rooms lay open…An open tomb.”  This is an example of what?
    • A. 

      foreshadowing

    • B. 

      irony

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 77. 
    Whose death symbolizes the loss of Elie’s faith?
    • A. 

      Juliek, the violinist

    • B. 

      Akiba Drumer

    • C. 

      Moshe, the Beadle

    • D. 

      The pipel

  • 78. 
    Which of the following symbolizes Elie’s loss of faith?
    • A. 

      Night

    • B. 

      The babies burning in pits in Auschwitz

    • C. 

      The hanging of the sad-eyed angel

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 79. 
    What time does the poem take place?
    • A. 

      Midnight

    • B. 

      Noon

    • C. 

      Dawn

  • 80. 
    What word does the raven say whenever it talks?
    • A. 

      Nevermore

    • B. 

      Prophet

    • C. 

      Lenore

  • 81. 
    How did the raven get into the house?
    • A. 

      He stepped in the window

    • B. 

      He flew in the door

    • C. 

      He was already in the house

  • 82. 
    Who were the main characters in the Gift of the Magi?
    • A. 

      Bella and Edward

    • B. 

      Della and Jim

    • C. 

      Maddie and James

    • D. 

      Bella and Jim

    • E. 

      Jamie and Dino

  • 83. 
    What did Jim sell in order to get Della her gift?
    • A. 

      A chain for a watch

    • B. 

      His Hair

    • C. 

      Hair combs

    • D. 

      His tie

    • E. 

      Gold watch

  • 84. 
    Lewis Carroll is the pseudonym of
    • A. 

      Samuel Clemens

    • B. 

      Charles Dodgson

    • C. 

      George Eliot

    • D. 

      Jane Austen

  • 85. 
    One of the themes in Alice in Wonderland is -
    • A. 

      The injustice of slavery

    • B. 

      The dangers of organized religion

    • C. 

      The growth from childhood to adulthood

    • D. 

      Triumph of the primal over the rational

  • 86. 
    Alice's adventures begins when she follows -
    • A. 

      The White Rabbit

    • B. 

      The Cheshire cat

    • C. 

      The Caterpillar

    • D. 

      Dina, her cat

  • 87. 
    The Caterpillar suggests to Alice that - 
    • A. 

      Change is natural

    • B. 

      The Queen of Hears should be avoided

    • C. 

      There is no difference between being a little boy and being a little girl

    • D. 

      Big people are bad and children are good

  • 88. 
    Inside the house, the Duchess is
    • A. 

      Eating a ham

    • B. 

      Nursing a baby

    • C. 

      Beheading a Footman

    • D. 

      Making soup

  • 89. 
    In Robert Frost's poem "Christmas Trees", the Christmas trees represent what?
    • A. 

      Trees

    • B. 

      His friends

    • C. 

      A party

    • D. 

      Algonquin Round Table

  • 90. 
    How is the poem "Christmas Trees" best described?
    • A. 

      A circular letter wishing his friends a Merry Christmas

    • B. 

      Hate mail

    • C. 

      An average poem

    • D. 

      Short story

  • 91. 
    Mark Twain is the pseudonym for - 
    • A. 

      Charles Dodgson

    • B. 

      Robert Frost

    • C. 

      John Grisham

    • D. 

      Samuel Clemens

  • 92. 
    Twain is best described as a(n)
    • A. 

      Optimist

    • B. 

      Cynic

  • 93. 
    Who are the main characters in "Skipping Christmas" by John Grisham?
    • A. 

      Jim and Della

    • B. 

      Samuel and Jackson

    • C. 

      Luther and Nora

    • D. 

      Elie Wiesel

  • 94. 
    Their daughter, Blair, travels to where?
    • A. 

      Peru

    • B. 

      India

    • C. 

      Egypt

    • D. 

      North Pole

  • 95. 
    What Christmas decoration do the neighbors want Luther and Nora to set free?
    • A. 

      Santa Claus

    • B. 

      Rudolph

    • C. 

      Iron Man

    • D. 

      Frosty

  • 96. 
    The Krank's cruise left on which day?
    • A. 

      New Year's Day

    • B. 

      Christmas Day

    • C. 

      Halloween

    • D. 

      Thanksgiving

  • 97. 
    In "The Innocents Abroad", Twain is fed up with which artist?
    • A. 

      Leonardo DaVinci

    • B. 

      Robert Bentley

    • C. 

      Michael Angelo

    • D. 

      Beethoven