11 & 12 Grade English Midterm

97 Questions | Total Attempts: 118

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11 & 12 Grade English Midterm

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A repetition of sentences using the same structure.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Parallel Structure

    • C. 

      Aphorism

    • D. 

      Pastoral

  • 2. 
    The structure of a story; the sequence of events in a story; includes the exposition, rising action, the climax, the falling action, and the resolution.
    • A. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Plot

  • 3. 
    The emotional content of a word.
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Figurative Language

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 4. 
    The dictionary definition of a word.
    • A. 

      Conotation

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 5. 
    A mild word or phrase which substitues for another which would be undesirable because it is too direct, unpleasant, or offensive.
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Genre

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Picaresque Novel

  • 6. 
    The result of an action is the reverse of what the actor expected.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Situational Irony

    • C. 

      Postmodernism

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

  • 7. 
    The audience knows something that the characters in the drama do not.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Bildungsroman

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Dramatic Irony

  • 8. 
    The contrast is between the literal meaning of what is said and what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verbal Irony

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 9. 
    The use of angry and insulting language.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Invective

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 10. 
    Pervasive irony created by a structural feature such as a naive protagonist whose viewpoint is consistently wrong, shared by neither author nor reader is known as this.
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Myth

    • C. 

      Structural Irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 11. 
    A figure os speech wherein a comparison is made between two unlike quantities without the use of the words "like" or "as."
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 12. 
    The hero or central character of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Literary Theory

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 13. 
    A device in literature where an object represents an idea.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Parody

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Theme

  • 14. 
    A statement which lessens or minimizes the importance of what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verisimilitude

    • B. 

      Understatement

    • C. 

      Colloquialism

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 15. 
    An author's choice of words.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Syntax

    • D. 

      Genre

  • 16. 
    Unintentional use of an inappropriate word similar in sound to the appropriate word, often with humorous effect.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Modernism

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 17. 
    A play on words wherein a word is used to convey two meanings at the same time.
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 18. 
    A literary style in which one's thoughts and feelings are depicted in a continuous and uninterrupted flow.
    • A. 

      Stream of Consciousness

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Sonnet

    • D. 

      Soliloquy

  • 19. 
    Language that is native to people (as opposed to learned language) and is used as everyday speech.
    • A. 

      Jarg

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Figure of Speech

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 20. 
    A writer creates unreal characters and situations and asks the reader to pretend that they are real in a fictional work.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 21. 
    A reference in one literary work to a character or theme found in another literary work.
    • A. 

      Analogy

    • B. 

      Apostrophe

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Bildungsroman

  • 22. 
    The method a writer uses to reveal the personality of a character in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Characterization

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 23. 
    Characters that do not change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 24. 
    Characters wiht only one dominant trait or aspect, such as greed or anger.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 25. 
    Characters that change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

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