Prime Cm&s: Annual Refresher Training On Nuclear Density Gauge Operation & Safety.

40 Questions | Total Attempts: 47

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Prime Cm&s: Annual Refresher Training On Nuclear Density Gauge Operation & Safety.

Prime CM&S Annual Refresher Training on Nuclear Density Gauge Operation & Safety Any Prime CM&S staff in Columbus or Cincinnati who anticipate utilizing a nuclear density gauge within the next 12-months must complete this quiz.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    It is ok to take the nuclear density gauge home, as long as you check on it every few hours.
    • A. 

      True, our license permits the gauge to be stored anywhere.

    • B. 

      False, the nuclear gauge should be returned to its authorized storage location at the end of each work day.

  • 2. 
    If you know you will be reporting back to the same job site for more compaction testing the following morning; it is acceptable to leave the gauge in the contractors trailer overnight.
    • A. 

      True, there is no problem with this.

    • B. 

      False, this is unacceptable.

  • 3. 
    All nuclear gauges must be signed out when removing from storage.
    • A. 

      True, Prime's radioactive materials license requires documentation of each time a nuclear gauge was removed from it's authorized storage area.

    • B. 

      False, signing out nuclear gauges is at the discretion of the technician.

  • 4. 
    The user must sign the gauge back in to the storage area daily.
    • A. 

      True, Prime's radioactive materials license requires documentation of each time a nuclear gauge was returned to it's authorized storage area.

    • B. 

      False, it's not a big deal if you forget to sign the gauge back in.

  • 5. 
    In the event of a structural fire (a building or trailer) involving a nuclear gauge, you should have firefighters...
    • A. 

      Let the fire burn

    • B. 

      Use conventional fire-fighting techniques.

  • 6. 
    Radioactive materials are capable of contaminating objects & people through...
    • A. 

      Inhalation

    • B. 

      Exposure

    • C. 

      Combustion

    • D. 

      Osmosis

  • 7. 
    Which of the three below represent the principles of protecting yourself from radiation?
    • A. 

      Time, Diagnose, Save

    • B. 

      Telephone, Direct, Supervisor

    • C. 

      Time, Distance, Shielding

    • D. 

      Travel, Density, Solar

  • 8. 
    A hazmat employee is an employee that...
    • A. 

      Cannot handle hazardous materials

    • B. 

      Has been exposed to hazardous materials

    • C. 

      Has been cited by OSHA

    • D. 

      Handles hazardous materials as part of the job

  • 9. 
    When properly used by a trained and qualified operator, nuclear density gauges present____ danger to the health and well-being of the operator.
    • A. 

      No

    • B. 

      Little

    • C. 

      Much

    • D. 

      High levels of

  • 10. 
    Each gauge has a document packet, which of the following is NOT in the packet?
    • A. 

      Prime's License for Radioactive Material.

    • B. 

      Prime's Emergency Procedure

    • C. 

      The most recent calibration & leak test documents for the gauge.

    • D. 

      Prime's Radiation Safety Program

    • E. 

      Updated list of Authorized Users

    • F. 

      Blank compaction testing forms.

    • G. 

      Gauge Operation Manual

    • H. 

      Gauge Standard Count Log

  • 11. 
    The packet in each of Prime's nuclear gauge cases should remain in the case during transportation.
    • A. 

      True, this is the safest place for the packet to be stored during transportation.

    • B. 

      False, the nuclear gauge packet should be within arm's reach of the driver during transportation. This is so that the packet is visible to anyone entering the vehicle or so that it can be provided to law enforcement.

  • 12. 
    When transporting the nuclear gauge, the nuclear gauge packet should be placed where?
    • A. 

      Within arm's reach of the driver

    • B. 

      Locked in the nuke transport case

    • C. 

      In the glove box

    • D. 

      Left at the lab/shop so it does not get misplaced

  • 13. 
    The nuclear gauge and case should be locked and braced to the bed of the truck using what?
    • A. 

      Heavy Rope

    • B. 

      Chain or braided steel cable

    • C. 

      Industrial zip ties

  • 14. 
    In the event of a vehicle accident when transporting a nuclear gauge, the first person on the Emergency Contact Call-down list is...
    • A. 

      911

    • B. 

      Ohio Department of Health

    • C. 

      Andy Hood (RSO)

    • D. 

      Cline's Technical Service

  • 15. 
    Which end of the truck bed should the gauge be chained/cabled to?
    • A. 

      Securely chained near the tailgate, away from passengers.

    • B. 

      Securely chained to the cab end of the bed, near passengers.

  • 16. 
    The Federal Hazardous Materials Regulations give you permission to use any size label on a radioactive materials package being transported/shipped.
    • A. 

      True, as long as it has most of the same symbols it should be good.

    • B. 

      False, there are specific labels for our nuclear gauge cases which are to be intact and in good condition during transport.

  • 17. 
    It is the responsibility of the driver transporting a nuclear gauge to or from a job site to verify that the appropriate nuclear transport documents are with the gauge.
    • A. 

      True, signing a gauge out of its storage area assumes your responsibility for proper care and appropriate use of all contents within the case. 

    • B. 

      False, it is the responsibility of whoever used that gauge & its contents previously.

  • 18. 
    "Radioactive Material" signs must be on the vehicle transporting a nuclear gauge.
    • A. 

      True, Prime trucks are required to have a big orange sticker on the tailgate stating that they're transporting radioactive equipment.

    • B. 

      False, this is not a requirement of Prime's radioactive materials license. Though it is critical to have the nuclear gauge packet available in the cab of the vehicle for law enforcement to inspect in the event of an accident or pull-over.

  • 19. 
    ODOT allows any gauge to be used on ODOT projects.
    • A. 

      True, any gauge can be used on an ODOT project

    • B. 

      False, only gauges which have been certified by ODOT may be used on ODOT projects.

  • 20. 
    Whenever testing compaction, it's a good idea to bring a one-point kit also, even if you believe you'll only be testing materials you already have proctors for.
    • A. 

      True, the contractor could introduce new material to the site -or- the client could want a new area tested.

    • B. 

      False, we're only on-site to test what we suppose we may be testing that day.

  • 21. 
    Your RSO insists that when the gauge is unlocked and removed from the transport case, the technician using the gauge treats the gauge as...
    • A. 

      An extension of themselves. (Immediately within arm's reach and free of hazard.)

    • B. 

      A beacon of light. (Placed in a well-lit area, visible from most places on-site.)

    • C. 

      Dry as a scorpion in the Sahara Desert. (Dry & Dangerous.)

  • 22. 
    You should secure and lock the nuclear gauge in its case while you tend to other daily tasks.
    • A. 

      True, there are dozens to hundreds of people you don't know on construction sites who should not be assumed to be trustworthy. Your signature for taking the gauge out assumes your responsibility for both damage & theft/misplacement.

    • B. 

      False, the gauge can simply stay near the truck while you test concrete or go into the job trailer.

  • 23. 
    If a nuclear gauge is crushed and destroyed in a work zone by a dump truck while the technicians run to the restroom real quick, who is at fault?
    • A. 

      The dump truck operator, for not spotting the hazard.

    • B. 

      The testing technician, for not treating the gauge as an extension of themselves.

  • 24. 
    Which scenario is a likely consequence if a Prime nuclear gauge were to be destroyed by heavy equipment on a construction site?
    • A. 

      The technician responsible would indeed face administrative action & likely termination.

    • B. 

      An extensive radiation pollution survey would have to be conducted on the job site, shutting down work for days -to- weeks while permanently damaging Prime CM&S reputation as a prestigious materials testing company.

    • C. 

      Prime CM&S would have their license to handle radioactive materials & equipment in the state of Ohio suspended or revoked, damaging contractual obligations on dozens of sites to provide compaction testing.

    • D. 

      All of the above are highly likely consequences.

  • 25. 
    Prior to use, the gauge standardization test should be taken how?
    • A. 

      On the provided standard block

    • B. 

      Away fro vehicles and power equipment

    • C. 

      Daily, or when gauge accuracy is in quesiton

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 26. 
    A test often taken from 2" - 12" , in which the Gamma Source emits radiation to the Gamma Ray Detector, is called a ______ test
    • A. 

      Transmission

    • B. 

      Gamma Analysis

    • C. 

      One Point

    • D. 

      Detectomatic

  • 27. 
    A test which only tests the top 2-3 inches of material is called a ____ test.
    • A. 

      Bounce Back

    • B. 

      Out and Back

    • C. 

      Backscatter

    • D. 

      Short Bounce

  • 28. 
    It is ok to let an inspector from another company operate our nuclear gauges as long as they have used them before and they seem trustworthy.
    • A. 

      True, this could be a good team building practice for the job site.

    • B. 

      False, only persons listed on the Authorized Users sheet in the gauge packet are to operate Prime nuclear gauges.

  • 29. 
    If you have to leave a job site to pickup lunch; it is acceptable to leave the gauge in a secure location at the site until you return.
    • A. 

      True, a run for lunch shouldn't take more than 30 minutes, which isn't long enough for something to happen to the gauge.

    • B. 

      False, in this instance; the technician should turn off, clean & lock the gauge back in its protective case before securing it to the bed of the truck and departing for lunch.

  • 30. 
    Nuclear gauges should be _____ before being placed back in their protective cases.
    • A. 

      Turned off

    • B. 

      Cleaned

    • C. 

      Locked

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 31. 
    Nuclear density gauges are weatherproof, testing in the rain or snow does not pose any risk or damage.
    • A. 

      True, their rigid structure implies they're weatherproof.

    • B. 

      False, despite their rigid structure; nuclear gauges are extremely susceptible to damage from all forms of moisture.

  • 32. 
    It is acceptable to test compaction in light rain and snow.
    • A. 

      True, light precipitation isn't that bad for the gauge.

    • B. 

      False, introducing the nuclear gauge to any amount of moisture can lead to repairs that exceed $500.00

  • 33. 
    Temperatures exceeding  250°f of a fresh asphalt mat will not damage the nuclear gauge from prolonged exposure.
    • A. 

      True, the nuclear source is securely sealed within the gauge housing

    • B. 

      False, prolonged exposure to temperatures this high can "fry" the electronic components of a nuclear gauge

  • 34. 
    Your RSO is your primary contact in the case of any emergencies involving the gauge. What does RSO stand for?
    • A. 

      Resident Superintendent Officer

    • B. 

      Radiation Safety Officer

    • C. 

      Reulating Supervisor Official

    • D. 

      Required Safety Overseer

  • 35. 
    Nuclear density gauge repairs due to moisture really aren't that expensive or time-consuming.
    • A. 

      True, nuclear gauges are really just simple computers inside a metal case.

    • B. 

      False, nuclear gauge repairs are very expensive. Additionally; they require several non-billable trips to Cline's and it takes the gauge out of use for an upwards of 2 months.

  • 36. 
    Nuclear gauges need to be calibrated every...
    • A. 

      3 months

    • B. 

      6 months

    • C. 

      12 months

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 37. 
    Prime's primary contact for nuke training and nuke calibration is...
    • A. 

      Burt's Nuke Service

    • B. 

      Chet's Radiation Service

    • C. 

      Cline's Technical Service

    • D. 

      Carl's Nuke Emporium

  • 38. 
    Nuclear density gauge technicians should be familiar with their employer's...
    • A. 

      Radiation Safety Program

    • B. 

      Insurance Policy

    • C. 

      Employment Policy

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 39. 
    What will happen the first-time Prime management becomes aware of an emlpoyee's misuse or neglect of a nuclear gauge.
    • A. 

      A verbal warning

    • B. 

      A written warning

    • C. 

      The employee must pay for the next leak test on that gauge.

    • D. 

      Immediate suspension of the employee from using or transporting a nuclear gauge.

  • 40. 
    Compaction reports should be turned into your lab supervisor at the end of each ____.
    • A. 

      Month

    • B. 

      Week

    • C. 

      Day