An Inspector Calls Character And Quote Analysis

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An Inspector Calls Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of the following are examples of stereotypes presented inAn Inspector Calls?

    • A.

      Women are obsessed with pretty clothes, shopping and weddings

    • B.

      Young middle and upper class women are to be protected from "unpleasant and disturbing things"

    • C.

      Women are proud, vain, petty and jealous

    • D.

      Women often get "hysterical"

    • E.

      All except A

    • F.

      All except B

    • G.

      All except C

    • H.

      All except D

    • I.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    I. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above". This means that all of the given statements are examples of stereotypes presented in "An Inspector Calls". These stereotypes include women being obsessed with pretty clothes, shopping, and weddings; young middle and upper-class women being protected from unpleasant things; women being proud, vain, petty, and jealous; and women often getting hysterical.

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  • 2. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of Sheila's relationship with Gerald?

    • A.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is perhaps the most functional and honest in the play.

    • B.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is is an example of what happens when two people speak to each other about their misdeeds, and then attempt afterward to reconcile.

    • C.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is damaged beyond repair when she learns of the role he played in the death of Eva Smith because she realises that she cannot trust him to be honest with her.

    • D.

      At the end of the play, Sheila and Gerald leave open the possibility that they might reunite as a couple, even after what they have learned about each other.

    • E.

      Sheila respects Gerald more after his revelations about his relationship with Eva

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All except E

    • K.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    H. All except C
    Explanation
    Sheila's relationship with Gerald is portrayed as functional and honest in the play, making statement A true. They have a conversation about their misdeeds and attempt to reconcile, making statement B true. However, Sheila's relationship with Gerald is damaged beyond repair when she learns of his role in Eva Smith's death, as she realizes she cannot trust him to be honest with her, making statement C false. At the end of the play, Sheila and Gerald leave open the possibility of reuniting as a couple, making statement D true. Sheila actually respects Gerald more after his revelations about his relationship with Eva, making statement E true. Therefore, the correct answer is all except C.

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  • 3. 

    Why did Mr. Birling fire Eva?

    • A.

      She wanted twenty-five shillings a week instead of twenty-two and six

    • B.

      She was not a good worker

    • C.

      Mr. Birling wanted to use her firing to strike fear into the hearts of other women who might be tempted to go on strike

    • D.

      She was involved in an inappropriate relationship with Mr. Birling's son

    • E.

      She was brave and spoke out against the low wages being paid by Birling and co.

    • F.

      A, B and C

    • G.

      A and B

    • H.

      A and C

    • I.

      A and D

    • J.

      All except A and C

    • K.

      All except B and D

    • L.

      All except C and D

    • M.

      All except D and E

    • N.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    K. All except B and D
    Explanation
    Mr. Birling fired Eva because she wanted a higher wage, which he refused to give her. He also wanted to use her firing as a warning to other women who might consider going on strike. Additionally, Eva was involved in an inappropriate relationship with Mr. Birling's son. Therefore, the correct answer is "All except B and D."

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  • 4. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of Gerald in An Inspector Calls?

    • A.

      He agrees with Mr. Birling that the ringleaders of the strike had to be fired

    • B.

      He believes that young women like Eva are to be protected from "unpleasant things"

    • C.

      He learns from his mistakes and grows and changes throughout the play

    • D.

      Priestley uses him to suggest that a more caring future is not inevitable -people can choose to change or remain set in their ways

    • E.

      He is one of the younger generation but he remains unchanged

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All except E

    • K.

      A, B and C

    • L.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    G. All except B
    Explanation
    Gerald agrees with Mr. Birling that the ringleaders of the strike had to be fired, which is stated in the first option. He learns from his mistakes and grows and changes throughout the play, as mentioned in the third option. Priestley uses him to suggest that a more caring future is not inevitable - people can choose to change or remain set in their ways, which is stated in the fourth option. However, it is not mentioned that Gerald believes that young women like Eva are to be protected from "unpleasant things", so option B is not true. Therefore, the correct answer is all except B.

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  • 5. 

    Which of the following can best be described as " a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing "?

    • A.

      Stereotype

    • B.

      Dramatic irony

    • C.

      Imagery

    Correct Answer
    A. Stereotype
    Explanation
    A stereotype is a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing. It is a preconceived notion or generalization that may not necessarily reflect the true characteristics or qualities of individuals or objects. Stereotypes often lead to unfair judgments or assumptions based on limited information or biased beliefs.

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  • 6. 

    What does Priestley suggest about Sheila when he allows her to say " “I think it’s perfect. Now I really feel engaged" ?

    • A.

      Women are obsessed with pretty clothes, shopping and weddings

    • B.

      Sheila is superficial and materialistic

    • C.

      Sheila needs an expensive symbol of Gerald's love

    • D.

      Women often get "hysterical"

    • E.

      All except A

    • F.

      All except B

    • G.

      All except C

    • H.

      All except D

    • I.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    H. All except D
    Explanation
    Priestley suggests that Sheila is not obsessed with pretty clothes, shopping, weddings, or needing an expensive symbol of Gerald's love. He allows her to say "I think it's perfect. Now I really feel engaged" to indicate that she is not superficial, materialistic, or focused solely on material possessions. This suggests that Sheila is capable of being engaged and interested in deeper, more meaningful aspects of life beyond superficial appearances and material goods.

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  • 7. 

    Eva Smith/Daisy Renton and Sheila are similar in that both women challenge some of the stereotypes of their day.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Eva Smith/Daisy Renton and Sheila challenge the stereotypes of their day. This implies that both women go against the norms and expectations placed upon them by society. They likely exhibit behaviors or attitudes that are not commonly associated with women during their time period. By challenging these stereotypes, Eva Smith/Daisy Renton and Sheila demonstrate their individuality and refusal to conform to societal expectations.

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  • 8. 

    What does Priestley suggest about about Mr.Birling when he allows him to say ... a man has to make his own way—has to look after himself—and his family, too, of course, when he has one—and so long as he does that he won’t come to much harm " ?

    • A.

      Mr.Birling believes that hard work is sufficient enough to allow a person to “get ahead.”

    • B.

      Mr. Birling's worldview is one of total individualism, where society is understood as a collection of persons and their families, each of which tries to maximize his or her own financial and social happiness

    • C.

      Mr. Birling is a capitalist who cares only about himself and his family

    • D.

      Mr. Birling will not hesitate to exploit anyone he can

    • E.

      All except A

    • F.

      All except B

    • G.

      All except C

    • H.

      All except D

    • I.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    I. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer suggests that all of the given statements about Mr. Birling are true. Mr. Birling believes in the importance of hard work and self-reliance, indicating that he believes it is sufficient for success. He also holds a worldview of individualism, where each person and their family strive for their own happiness. Additionally, he is portrayed as a capitalist who prioritizes his own interests and is willing to exploit others. Therefore, all of the options A, B, C, and D are correct statements about Mr. Birling.

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  • 9. 

    What does Priestley suggest about his views whe he uses the doorbell to interrupt Mr.Birling's speech?

    • A.

      He disagrees with Mr.Birling and does not believe that hard work is sufficient enough to allow a person to “get ahead.”

    • B.

      He believes that Mr. Birling's worldview is wrong -society is not simply a collection of persons and their families, each unaffected by the actions of others as each tries to maximize his or her own financial and social happiness

    • C.

      Unlike Mr. Birling, he is a socialist who thinks that "We are all members of one body"

    • D.

      Mr. Birling's speech ignores many of the advantages that Arthur and his family have enjoyed, simply because of their social class

    • E.

      All except A

    • F.

      All except B

    • G.

      All except C

    • H.

      All except D

    • I.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    I. All of the above
    Explanation
    Priestley suggests all of the given views when he uses the doorbell to interrupt Mr. Birling's speech. He disagrees with Mr. Birling's belief that hard work alone is enough for success, indicating that he does not share the same perspective. He also challenges Mr. Birling's worldview, emphasizing that society is interconnected and individuals' actions impact others. Additionally, Priestley's interruption highlights his socialist beliefs, where he believes that everyone is part of a collective community. Lastly, Priestley implies that Mr. Birling's speech overlooks the privileges and advantages that his family has enjoyed due to their social class.

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  • 10. 

    What does Priestley suggest about his views he uses the Inspector to say " We don’t live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other. And I tell you that the time will soon come when if men will not learn that lesson, then they will be taught it in fire and blood and anguish"?

    • A.

      We have an obligation to look after the poor and vulnerable members of society

    • B.

      A world that provides privileges to one set of citizens and ignores the connections between people and the plight of the oppressed, poor and exploited is not a stable world

    • C.

      We are not all connected and trying to connect with others or take responsibility for our actions might have dire consequences

    • D.

      The clash between individual and collective interests will result in war and bloodshed like that spoken of in the book of Revelation in the Bible

    • E.

      If, as a society, we stop now and start to think about and meet the needs of the vulnerable members of society, we might avoid the death, destruction and devastation that will otherwise occur

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    H. All except C
    Explanation
    Priestley suggests that we have an obligation to look after the poor and vulnerable members of society. He emphasizes the importance of recognizing the connections between people and the consequences of ignoring the plight of the oppressed and exploited. He warns that if we do not learn this lesson, there will be dire consequences such as fire, bloodshed, and anguish. Therefore, the correct answer is that all options except for C are suggested by Priestley in his statement.

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  • 11. 

    Which of the following are ways in which the young women in the play challenge the stereotypes society wants to impose on them?

    • A.

      Eva questions and challenges the decision re. wages of her employer instead of simply accepting them

    • B.

      Instead of relying on a man to save her, Eva refuses to accept Eric's money and tries to save herself

    • C.

      Sheila interrupts and challenges her father and Gerald at different point in the play

    • D.

      Sheila starts to state her own opinion openly and no longer gives her opinions in a "half joking" manner

    • E.

      Sheila uses her power as a valued customer to get Eva fired

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All except E

    • K.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    J. All except E
    Explanation
    The young women in the play challenge the stereotypes society wants to impose on them in various ways. Eva questions and challenges the decision regarding her wages, showing that she is not willing to simply accept them. Instead of relying on a man to save her, Eva refuses Eric's money and tries to save herself, asserting her independence. Sheila interrupts and challenges both her father and Gerald at different points in the play, demonstrating her assertiveness. Sheila also starts to state her own opinions openly, no longer giving them in a "half joking" manner, which challenges the expectation that women should be submissive. However, Sheila uses her power as a valued customer to get Eva fired, which does not challenge the stereotypes but reinforces them. Therefore, the correct answer is "All except E."

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  • 12. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of Sheila's relationship with Gerald?

    • A.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is perhaps the most functional and honest in the play.

    • B.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is is an example of what happens when two people speak to each other about their misdeeds, and then attempt afterward to reconcile.

    • C.

      Sheila’s relationship with Gerald is damaged beyond repair when she learns of the role he played in the death of Eva Smith because she realises that she cannot trust him to be honest with her.

    • D.

      At the end of the play, Sheila and Gerald leave open the possibility that they might reunite as a couple, even after what they have learned about each other.

    • E.

      Sheila respects Gerald more after his revelations about his relationship with Eva

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All except E

    • K.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    H. All except C
    Explanation
    Sheila's relationship with Gerald is functional and honest in the play. They speak to each other about their misdeeds and attempt to reconcile. At the end of the play, they leave open the possibility of reuniting as a couple. Sheila also respects Gerald more after his revelations about his relationship with Eva. However, Sheila's relationship with Gerald is damaged beyond repair when she learns of his role in Eva Smith's death, as she realizes she cannot trust him to be honest with her. Therefore, all statements are true except for the possibility of Sheila and Gerald reuniting as a couple.

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  • 13. 

    What does the following suggest about Mrs. Birling? If you think you can bring any pressure to bear on me, Inspector, you’re quite mistaken. Unlike the other three, I did nothing I’m ashamed of or that won’t bear investigation.

    • A.

      Sybil refuses to believe that what she has done is wrong

    • B.

      Sybil believes that she upheld the procedures of the charity

    • C.

      Sybil has no guilt about using her power to prevent Daisy/Eva accessing desperately needed help

    • D.

      Sybil refuses to allow the Inspector to make her feel guilty about her actions

    • E.

      Sybil thinks that she is the only member of the family who has done nothing to feel embarrassed about

    • F.

      All except A

    • G.

      All except B

    • H.

      All except C

    • I.

      All except D

    • J.

      All except E

    • K.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    K. All of the above
    Explanation
    The given statement suggests that Mrs. Birling believes she has done nothing wrong and feels no guilt or shame about her actions. She refuses to believe that she should be pressured or made to feel guilty by the Inspector. This implies that she does not think what she has done is wrong, believes she upheld the procedures of the charity, has no guilt about preventing Daisy/Eva from accessing help, and thinks she is the only member of the family who has nothing to be embarrassed about. Therefore, all of the above options are correct.

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  • 14. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of the play An Inspector Calls?

    • A.

      Priestley’s play presents believable characters in a realistic upper-middle-class situation

    • B.

      Characters speak in “prose” rather than in “verse.”

    • C.

      The presence of the “Inspector” marks within An Inspector Calls the possibility of actions beyond rational reasoning

    • D.

      Priestley uses the play to explore the impact of industrial power and the question of human worth

    • E.

      An Inspector Calls is a historical drama, as it is set in the run-up to the World War One

    • F.

      An Inspector Calls is an example of immediate post-war drama, which means that it was written after World War Two.

    • G.

      All except A

    • H.

      All except B

    • I.

      All except C

    • J.

      All except D

    • K.

      All except E

    • L.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    L. All of the above
    Explanation
    The play "An Inspector Calls" by Priestley presents believable characters in a realistic upper-middle-class situation and explores the impact of industrial power and the question of human worth. The characters speak in "prose" rather than in "verse." The presence of the "Inspector" marks the possibility of actions beyond rational reasoning. The play is set in the run-up to World War One, making it a historical drama. Since the answer states "All of the above," it means that all the statements mentioned are true for the play.

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  • 15. 

    Which of the following IS NOT TRUE of the play An Inspector Calls?

    • A.

      Priestley suggests that while social class is important to the normal functioning of society, individuals can choose to act differently

    • B.

      Priestley uses the play to explore how ill-considered actions on the individual scale can have fatal, if unintentional, consequences

    • C.

      Priestley uses dramatic irony to present Mr. Birling as a short-sighted, opinionated man who does not know as much as he thinks he knows

    • D.

      Priestley challenges the audience's view of women by allowing Sheila to get stronger while Mr. Birling, Gerald and Eric get weaker as the play develops

    • E.

      Priestley uses the issue of class to drive the plot and shape the characters

    • F.

      The characters in the play represent the social classes present in society and Priestley challenges their views and behaviour in order to challenge the class hierarchy

    • G.

      Priestley uses the Birling's arrogant, thoughtless behaviour toward Eva Smith/Daisy Renton to suggest that this type of behaviour was comnon among the middle and upper classes

    • H.

      All except A

    • I.

      All except B

    • J.

      All except C

    • K.

      All except D

    • L.

      All except E

    • M.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. Priestley suggests that while social class is important to the normal functioning of society, individuals can choose to act differently
    Explanation
    Priestley's play An Inspector Calls challenges the audience's view of women, as Sheila becomes stronger while the male characters weaken. He also uses the issue of class to drive the plot and shape the characters, challenging their views and behaviors to challenge the class hierarchy. Additionally, Priestley uses the Birling family's arrogant and thoughtless behavior towards Eva Smith/Daisy Renton to imply that this behavior was common among the middle and upper classes. However, the given statement suggests that individuals have the power to choose to act differently, implying that social class does not necessarily determine one's actions.

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  • 16. 

    Which of the following IS NOT TRUE of life in Britain in 1912?

    • A.

      Society was firmly divided along class lines

    • B.

      The Labour Party was formed in 1906 to represent the interests of the working class

    • C.

      Only men who owned property could vote

    • D.

      Charities like Mrs. Birling's were very important as there was not much government help for people like Eva who needed financial or other support

    • E.

      Middle-class women were expected to plan parties, go shopping, marry into money and do domestic jobs like cook, wash and clean

    • F.

      Gender roles (how men and women were expected to behave) were clearly defined for the wealthy middle class

    • G.

      Men were expected to work and protect women - especially their wives and daughters

    • H.

      All except A

    • I.

      All except B

    • J.

      All except C

    • K.

      All except D

    • L.

      All except E

    • M.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. Middle-class women were expected to plan parties, go shopping, marry into money and do domestic jobs like cook, wash and clean
    Explanation
    In 1912 Britain, middle-class women were not expected to plan parties, go shopping, marry into money, and do domestic jobs like cook, wash, and clean. This statement is not true because during that time, middle-class women were expected to adhere to strict gender roles and focus on their domestic duties, such as managing the household and raising children. They were not encouraged to work outside the home or participate in social activities like party planning or shopping.

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  • 17. 

    Working class women had different roles to middle-class women. Working class women were viewed as "cheap labour" and many worked in factories or worked as servants.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The explanation for the given correct answer is that working class women had different roles compared to middle-class women. They were often seen as "cheap labor" and commonly worked in factories or served as domestic workers. This implies that the statement "Working class women had different roles to middle-class women" is true.

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  • 18. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of Sheila?

    • A.

      Sheila's language makes her seem childish at first

    • B.

      She abused her power and status as a wealthy customer of Milwards when she insisted that Eva Smith be fired

    • C.

      Priestley uses her as a moral judge at the end of the play

    • D.

      The Inspector's revelations change her for good

    • E.

      Priestley presents her as a strong-willed, intelligent young woman

    • F.

      Unlike her parents, Sheila has moral standards

    • G.

      Sheila becomes a bit like the iInspector. She adopts some of the Inspector's techniques asking questions and forcing the others to confront the role they played in the death of Eva Smith

    • H.

      All except A

    • I.

      All except B

    • J.

      All except C

    • K.

      All except D

    • L.

      All except E

    • M.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    M. All of the above
    Explanation
    The given answer states that all of the statements about Sheila are true. This means that Sheila's language initially appears childish, she abused her power as a wealthy customer, Priestley uses her as a moral judge, the Inspector's revelations change her, she is presented as a strong-willed and intelligent young woman, unlike her parents she has moral standards, and she adopts some of the Inspector's techniques.

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  • 19. 

    Which of the following are TRUE of Sheila?

    • A.

      At the start of the play she uses childish, simple language

    • B.

      By the end of the play, she is confident and assertive

    • C.

      As the play progresses, she uses simple, plain and sometimes blunt language - just like the Inspector

    • D.

      Priestley makes her voice sound full of emotion and her language seems honest and heartfelt

    • E.

      Priestley presents her as a strong-willed, intelligent young woman who as the play unfolds, begins to disagree openly with her parents

    • F.

      By making Sheila seem young, naive and immature at the start of the play, Priestley mkes her involvement in the death of Eva Smith/Daisy Renton easier to forgive because it would appear that her actions were prompted more by immaturity than by malice or class prejudice

    • G.

      Sheila becomes a bit like the Inspector. She adopts some of the Inspector's techniques asking questions and forcing the others to confront the role they played in the death of Eva Smith

    • H.

      All except A

    • I.

      All except B

    • J.

      All except C

    • K.

      All except D

    • L.

      All except E

    • M.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    M. All of the above
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "All of the above" because all of the statements provided are true of Sheila. At the start of the play, she uses childish and simple language, but by the end, she becomes confident and assertive. As the play progresses, Sheila's language becomes similar to the Inspector's, using simple and blunt language. Priestley presents her as a strong-willed and intelligent young woman who openly disagrees with her parents. Additionally, Sheila's involvement in the death of Eva Smith/Daisy Renton is easier to forgive due to her initial immaturity rather than malice or class prejudice. Lastly, Sheila adopts some of the Inspector's techniques, questioning others and forcing them to confront their role in Eva Smith's death.

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  • 20. 

    Which of the following is NOT TRUE of the Inspector?

    • A.

      He seems to come from outside the class system, so he is in effect classless

    • B.

      The Inspector disagrees with the Birling's ideas about social class and social responsibility

    • C.

      Priestley uses the Inspector as his mouthpiece, so that his views are spoken by the Inspector

    • D.

      Eric and Sheila realise that the Inspector's moral judgement is as important as or even more important than his legal power s

    • E.

      The Inspector does not share Mr. Birling's interests or values and he is not impressed by Mr. Birling's status and power

    • F.

      The Inspector passes on capitalist messages about the dangers of social class and teaches the other characters as well as the audience a lesson

    • G.

      He does not follow etiquette (normal rules of social behaviour) because he interrupts, repeats, pauses in ways which were not the norm in middle-class prewar England

    • H.

      He represents an all-knowing god-like force that holds the characters responsible for their actions

    • I.

      All except A

    • J.

      All except B

    • K.

      All except C

    • L.

      All except D

    • M.

      All except E

    • N.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    F. The Inspector passes on capitalist messages about the dangers of social class and teaches the other characters as well as the audience a lesson
  • 21. 

    Which of the following might you include in a question exploring the function of the Inspector and the way Priestley present him? 

    • A.

      He drives the plot

    • B.

      The Inspector passes on Priestley's message about social responsibility

    • C.

      Priestley uses the Inspector as his mouthpiece, to show the dangers of class prejudice

    • D.

      He has a strong sense of morality

    • E.

      The Inspector believes in equality and does not share Mr. Birling's interests or values nor he is not impressed by Mr. Birling's status and power

    • F.

      Priestley presents him as a mysterious, all-seeing god-like figure who is outside any class

    • G.

      He does not follow etiquette (normal rules of social behaviour) because he interrupts, repeats, pauses in ways which were not the norm in middle-class prewar England

    • H.

      He shatters the illusion of the 'perfect' family

    • I.

      All except A

    • J.

      All except B

    • K.

      All except C

    • L.

      All except D

    • M.

      All except E

    • N.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    N. All of the above
    Explanation
    The function of the Inspector in the play is explored by including all of the given options. The Inspector drives the plot by uncovering the truth and exposing the family's secrets. He also serves as Priestley's mouthpiece, conveying the message of social responsibility. The Inspector represents the dangers of class prejudice and promotes equality, contrasting with Mr. Birling's values. Priestley presents him as a mysterious, all-seeing figure who is outside any class. The Inspector's unconventional behavior, such as interrupting and repeating, challenges the norms of social behavior. Ultimately, the Inspector shatters the illusion of the 'perfect' family.

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  • 22. 

    Which of the following is NOT TRUE of Sybil Birling? 

    • A.

      Sybil is Mr. Birling's 'social superior', so she is from a family with a higher social status that Mr. Birling

    • B.

      Sybil lives by strict social standards that make her prejudiced against people from a lower social class

    • C.

      Priestley uses Sybil and her husband to suggest that some people are beyond redemption because they refuse to accept responsibility for their actions

    • D.

      Sybil is a self-centred woman who ha snot noticed her son's alcholism and dismisses her daughters concerns about her fiance's whereabouts the previous summer

    • E.

      Sybil learns from the Inspector's message and regrets not "having asked him a few more questions"

    • F.

      Priestley presents Sybil as traditional, proud, prejudiced and cruel

    • G.

      Sybil is outraged that Eva Smith/Daisy Renton would pretend to have "the fine feelings" of a woman of the middle or upper class

    • H.

      Sybil strictly follows the rules of etiquette because a good reputation is an important part of upholding status in society

    • I.

      All except A

    • J.

      All except B

    • K.

      All except C

    • L.

      All except D

    • M.

      All except E

    • N.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    E. Sybil learns from the Inspector's message and regrets not "having asked him a few more questions"
    Explanation
    Sybil Birling is not portrayed as someone who learns from the Inspector's message and regrets not asking more questions. This statement contradicts her character as a self-centered woman who dismisses her daughter's concerns and does not notice her son's alcoholism. The other statements all accurately describe Sybil's character and actions in the play.

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  • 23. 

    PEED stands for Point, Example, Explain, Develop. Read the following extract from an exam question. Where is the point? Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business. For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    • A.

      Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business.

    • B.

      For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • C.

      The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    Correct Answer
    A. Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business.
    Explanation
    The given answer is correct because it accurately summarizes the main point of the passage, which is that Gerald shares similar views with Mr. Birling, specifically in relation to business. The passage provides examples to support this point, such as Gerald's statement about Arthur's actions and their shared belief about the Inspector. This demonstrates that Gerald, like Mr. Birling, lacks social responsibility and prioritizes profit over the well-being of employees. The answer effectively captures the main idea of the passage without including unnecessary information.

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  • 24. 

    PEED stands for Point, Example, Explain, Develop. Read the following extract from an exam question. Where is the Example that is used to support the point?? Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business. For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    • A.

      Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business.

    • B.

      For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • C.

      The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    Correct Answer
    B. For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.
    Explanation
    The example that is used to support the point is Gerald's statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith. This shows that, like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that it is acceptable to prioritize profit over his employees' well-being.

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  • 25. 

    PEED stands for Point, Example, Explain, Develop. Read the following extract from an exam question. Where is the Explanation that is given to expand on the example that is used to support the point? Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business. For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    • A.

      Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business.

    • B.

      For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • C.

      Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • D.

      The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    Correct Answer
    C. Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.
    Explanation
    The given answer explains that Gerald lacks social responsibility and believes it is acceptable to prioritize profit over his employees' well-being, just like Mr. Birling. This is supported by the example provided, where Gerald states that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" when it comes to firing Eva Smith. This implies that Gerald shares Mr. Birling's views on business and lacks concern for the well-being of his employees. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is further emphasized at the end of the play when they both believe that the Inspector was a fake.

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  • 26. 

    PEED stands for Point, Example, Explain, Develop. Read the following extract from an exam question. Where is the Development? Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business. For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    • A.

      Gerald shares many of Mr. Birling's views, particularly about business.

    • B.

      For example, his statement that Arthur "couldn't have done anything else" with regards to firing Eva Smith shows that, Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • C.

      Like Mr. Birling, Gerald lacks social responsibility and thinks that is it acceptable to prioritise profit over his employees' well-being.

    • D.

      The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

    Correct Answer
    D. The similarity between Gerald and Mr. Birling is also shown at the end of the play when they are both happy to believe that the Inspector was a fake and it had all been a hoax.

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