Hamlet Act 1 : Quotes Test! Trivia Questions Quiz

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Hamlet Act 1 : Quotes Test! Trivia Questions Quiz - Quiz

Do you know anything about Hamlet Act 1? This quiz will demonstrate your knowledge. All of the main characters in Hamlet often have memorable quotes that make you think. There are many interesting observations made by these characters. This quiz involves the four main characters and their musings or soliloquies. Take this exercise and see how much you know about Hamlet Act 1.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    A little more than kin, and less than kind.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    This quote, "A little more than kin, and less than kind," is spoken by Hamlet in the play of the same name. In this line, Hamlet is referring to his relationship with his uncle, Claudius, who has married his mother after his father's death. The phrase suggests that while Hamlet is technically related to Claudius, their bond is lacking in true familial love or kindness. This quote reflects Hamlet's conflicted feelings towards his uncle and sets the stage for the complex relationships and themes explored throughout the play.

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  • 2. 

    Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    B. Marcellus
    Explanation
    Marcellus is the correct answer because this line is spoken by Marcellus in Shakespeare's play "Hamlet." The line is often interpreted as a metaphorical reference to the corruption and decay that exists within the state of Denmark. Marcellus says this line after witnessing the ghost of King Hamlet, suggesting that there is something deeply wrong and corrupt within the kingdom. The quote has become famous and is often used to describe situations where there is hidden corruption or deceit.

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  • 3. 

    There are more things in heaven and on earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    The quote "There are more things in heaven and on earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy" is spoken by Hamlet in the play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare. This quote suggests that there are unknown and mysterious aspects of the world that go beyond what can be understood through philosophy or human knowledge.

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  • 4. 

    O, my prophetic soul.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    This quote, "O, my prophetic soul," is spoken by Hamlet, the main character in the play of the same name by William Shakespeare. In this moment, Hamlet is expressing his astonishment and belief in his own ability to foresee the future. The phrase "prophetic soul" suggests that Hamlet has a deep understanding of what is to come, further emphasizing his complex and introspective nature.

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  • 5. 

    Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    C. Polonius
    Explanation
    Polonius is the correct answer because this quote is from the play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare, and Polonius is a character in the play who speaks these words. The quote suggests that one should listen more than speak, emphasizing the importance of being a good listener.

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  • 6. 

    Foul deeds will rise, though all earths o'erwhelm them to men's eyes

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    The given quote, "Foul deeds will rise, though all earths o'erwhelm them to men's eyes," is spoken by Hamlet in the play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare. This quote reflects Hamlet's belief that even though evil actions may be hidden or buried, they will eventually come to light and be exposed to the world. It showcases Hamlet's introspective and philosophical nature, as he contemplates the inevitability of truth and justice prevailing.

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  • 7. 

    Neither a borrower or lender be

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    C. Polonius
    Explanation
    Polonius is the correct answer because this line is spoken by Polonius in the play Hamlet. In Act 1, Scene 3, Polonius gives a long-winded speech of advice to his son Laertes, which includes the famous line "Neither a borrower nor a lender be." This line is often interpreted as a caution against getting involved in financial transactions with others, as it can lead to complications and strain relationships.

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  • 8. 

    Apparel oft proclaims the man.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    C. Polonius
    Explanation
    Polonius is the correct answer because this quote is from the play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare, and Polonius is one of the characters in the play. The quote suggests that a person's clothing and appearance can reveal a lot about their character and status. Polonius is known for being a wise and cautious advisor, and this quote emphasizes the importance of outward appearances in society.

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  • 9. 

    O that this too too solid flesh would melt,  Thaw and resolve itself into a dew, Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd His canon self 'gainst self slaughter.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    The given passage is a soliloquy from Shakespeare's play "Hamlet". The speaker expresses his desire for his own flesh to melt and dissolve into a dew, or for God to not have forbidden suicide. The mention of "self-slaughter" suggests that the speaker is contemplating taking his own life. Therefore, the correct answer is Hamlet, as he is the main character of the play and the one who delivers this soliloquy.

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  • 10. 

    Frailty thy name is woman

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamlet
    Explanation
    The phrase "Frailty thy name is woman" is a quote from Shakespeare's play Hamlet. In this quote, Hamlet is expressing his disappointment and frustration with women, suggesting that they are weak and unreliable. Therefore, the correct answer is Hamlet, as he is the character who utters this line in the play.

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  • 11. 

    This bodes some strange eruption to our state

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    D. Horatio
    Explanation
    In this quote from Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the speaker is expressing that something unusual or unexpected is about to happen to their state. Horatio is the best answer because he is a close friend of Hamlet and is often present during important events in the play. He is known for his loyalty and level-headedness, so his observation of a strange eruption in the state carries weight and credibility. Marcellus and Polonius are not as closely involved in the central events of the play, and Hamlet is the main character, not the speaker in this quote.

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  • 12. 

    It harrows me with fear and wonder.

    • A.

      Hamlet

    • B.

      Marcellus

    • C.

      Polonius

    • D.

      Horatio

    Correct Answer
    D. Horatio
    Explanation
    Horatio is the correct answer because he is the character who speaks this line in Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. The line suggests that something is causing the speaker to feel both fear and amazement. Since the line is attributed to Horatio, it implies that he is experiencing these emotions. This line is spoken in Act 1, Scene 1, when the characters are discussing the appearance of a ghost.

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