What Do These Idioms Mean? Quiz

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Pedersenerica
P
Pedersenerica
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 16 | Total Attempts: 63,176
Questions: 20 | Attempts: 35,017

SettingsSettingsSettings
What Do These Idioms Mean? Quiz - Quiz

Are you ready to take this "What Do These Idioms Mean? Quiz." An idiom is an expression or a group of words that have a symbolic meaning, sometimes even literal meaning. Idioms make the context of speech more productive than it could be in a simple- easy way. So, here we have got you a trivia on the same, it consists of more than twenty questions, and you have to face each.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    You look a little down in the dumps.

    • A.

      You are looking down.

    • B.

      You look a little bit angry.

    • C.

      You look sad.

    • D.

      You look great.

    Correct Answer
    C. You look sad.
    Explanation
    The phrase "in the dumps" is an idiom that means feeling sad or depressed. The statement "You look a little down in the dumps" implies that the person appears sad or unhappy. Therefore, the correct answer is "You look sad."

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    He comes across as a military commander.

    • A.

      He acts like a military commander.

    • B.

      He is a military commander.

    • C.

      He wants to join the military.

    • D.

      He is coming to a military base.

    Correct Answer
    A. He acts like a military commander.
    Explanation
    The given correct answer suggests that the person in question exhibits behavior and characteristics similar to that of a military commander. This implies that his actions, demeanor, and way of conducting himself resemble those of someone in a position of authority and leadership within the military.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Just cheer up and stick with a positive attitude.

    • A.

      Feel better and get a positivity stick.

    • B.

      Smile upwards and maintain a positive attitude.

    • C.

      Think "up" and get a sticky attitude.

    • D.

      Feel better and maintain positive thoughts.

    Correct Answer
    D. Feel better and maintain positive thoughts.
    Explanation
    The answer "Feel better and maintain positive thoughts" is the most appropriate because it directly aligns with the initial statement "Just cheer up and stick with a positive attitude." It emphasizes the importance of feeling better and actively choosing to have positive thoughts. The other options mention smiling, thinking "up," or using a positivity stick, but they do not address the aspect of feeling better or maintaining positive thoughts as directly as the correct answer does.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    He makes me feel like everything is over my head.

    • A.

      He makes me feel like things are on my head.

    • B.

      He makes me feel like I cannot understand anything.

    • C.

      He makes me feel the sky, the trees, and other large things.

    • D.

      He makes me feel my head, which is embarrassing.

    Correct Answer
    B. He makes me feel like I cannot understand anything.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "He makes me feel like I cannot understand anything." This is because the phrase "over my head" is often used to describe something that is too difficult or complex to comprehend. Therefore, when the person in question makes the speaker feel like everything is over their head, it implies that they are unable to understand anything.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    It has been one thing after another lately.

    • A.

      Things have been happening lately.

    • B.

      If one more thing happens, it will happen too late.

    • C.

      Many great things have been happening.

    • D.

      Things have happened close together in time.

    Correct Answer
    D. Things have happened close together in time.
    Explanation
    The phrase "one thing after another" suggests a series of events occurring in quick succession. This implies that multiple things have been happening close together in time.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Maybe it will even chance my luck, knock on wood.

    • A.

      Maybe it will change my luck, and someone's knocking.

    • B.

      Maybe it will change my luck if I knock on the door.

    • C.

      Maybe it will change my luck. I knock on wood to give myself luck.

    • D.

      Maybe it will even change my luck if I knock on wood as much as I can.

    Correct Answer
    C. Maybe it will change my luck. I knock on wood to give myself luck.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Maybe it will change my luck. I knock on wood to give myself luck." This answer correctly identifies the reason for knocking on wood as a superstitious belief in bringing good luck. The other options either incorrectly suggest that someone else is knocking, or that knocking on a door will change luck, or that knocking on wood multiple times will increase luck.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Please give it a rest.

    • A.

      Please stop talking about that topic.

    • B.

      Please lay down.

    • C.

      Please stop talking and lay down.

    • D.

      Please pull out the futon.

    Correct Answer
    A. Please stop talking about that topic.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Please stop talking about that topic." because it directly addresses the request to stop discussing a specific subject. The other options suggest actions like laying down or pulling out a futon, which are unrelated to the request to stop talking about the topic.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    I think I stand a change of getting that job.

    • A.

      I think I'll wait in line for that job.

    • B.

      I think many people are waiting in line for that job, and I'll wait too.

    • C.

      I think I might get that job.

    • D.

      I think I'll stand and think about the job.

    Correct Answer
    C. I think I might get that job.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "I think I might get that job." This is because the phrase "stand a chance" means to have a possibility or likelihood of achieving something. In the given sentence, the speaker expresses their belief that they have a possibility of getting the job.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    I'm sticking to the new diet.

    • A.

      I'm on a new diet of sticky rice.

    • B.

      I'm on a new diet of only sticky foods.

    • C.

      I'm sticking to the kitchen counter.

    • D.

      I'm obeying the new diet.

    Correct Answer
    D. I'm obeying the new diet.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "I'm obeying the new diet." The phrase "sticking to" is used metaphorically here to mean following or adhering to something, in this case, the new diet. The other options do not convey the same meaning and are unrelated to the concept of following a diet.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    This weather leaves a lot to be desired.

    • A.

      This weather is gloomy.

    • B.

      I don't like this weather.

    • C.

      This weather is rainy.

    • D.

      This weather is cloudy.

    Correct Answer
    B. I don't like this weather.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "I don't like this weather" because it expresses a personal dislike for the weather. The other options describe the weather but do not convey any personal opinion or preference.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    We need to get our ducks in a row.  

    • A.

      We need to get some ducks and line them up.

    • B.

      We need to hurry up like ducks flying.

    • C.

      We need to get organized.

    • D.

      We need to position our ducks.

    Correct Answer
    C. We need to get organized.
    Explanation
    The phrase "get our ducks in a row" is an idiomatic expression that means to get organized or to have things in order. It does not literally refer to getting ducks and lining them up or hurrying up like ducks flying. Therefore, the correct answer is "We need to get organized."

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Thanks for taking a rain check.

    • A.

      Thanks for agreeing to postpone our appointment.

    • B.

      Thanks for agreeing to meet, even though it's raining.

    • C.

      Thanks for meeting me on such a rainy day.

    • D.

      Thanks for writing me a check while it's raining.

    Correct Answer
    A. Thanks for agreeing to postpone our appointment.
    Explanation
    The phrase "taking a rain check" is commonly used to politely decline an invitation or request for the present moment, with the intention of accepting it at a later time. In this case, the speaker is expressing gratitude to the person for agreeing to postpone their appointment, indicating that they appreciate their flexibility and understanding.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    For the record, I think two of our people aren't pulling their weight.

    • A.

      For the recorded video session, I think two of our people need to gain weight.

    • B.

      In my opinion, two of our people need to do some weight lifting.

    • C.

      In my opinion, two of our people need to lose a lot of weight.

    • D.

      In my opinion, two of our people are not doing their fair share of work.

    Correct Answer
    D. In my opinion, two of our people are not doing their fair share of work.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "In my opinion, two of our people are not doing their fair share of work." This answer aligns with the statement made in the question that "two of our people aren't pulling their weight." It suggests that these individuals are not contributing as much as they should be and are not fulfilling their responsibilities adequately.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    We don't want our team to come under fire.

    • A.

      We don't want our team to get public criticism.

    • B.

      We don't want our team to get destroyed.

    • C.

      We don't want our team to get assaulted.

    • D.

      We don't want our team to die in smoke and flames.

    Correct Answer
    A. We don't want our team to get public criticism.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "We don't want our team to get public criticism." This answer aligns with the given statement that the team does not want to come under fire. "Public criticism" implies negative feedback or judgment from the public, which can be damaging to the team's reputation or morale. The other options, such as getting destroyed, assaulted, or dying in smoke and flames, are extreme and unrelated to the original statement.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    For crying out loud!

    • A.

      I am crying!

    • B.

      I am crazy!

    • C.

      I am frustrated!

    • D.

      I am seriously depressed!

    Correct Answer
    C. I am frustrated!
    Explanation
    The phrase "For crying out loud!" is an expression of frustration or exasperation. The subsequent statements in the text, such as "I am crying!" and "I am seriously depressed!", further reinforce the idea of frustration and distress. Therefore, the most suitable explanation for the given correct answer is "I am frustrated!" as it aligns with the overall tone and context of the text.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    When pigs fly!

    • A.

      That will never happen!

    • B.

      That will happen when extraordinary events begin to occur, such as pigs taking flight.

    • C.

      You're a pig, and you need to leave!

    • D.

      You're awful, and you need to get out!

    Correct Answer
    A. That will never happen!
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "That will never happen!" because the phrase "When pigs fly!" is an idiomatic expression used to convey that something is impossible or highly unlikely to occur. It is often used sarcastically or humorously to dismiss unrealistic or absurd ideas. Therefore, the answer reflects the meaning and usage of the given phrase.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    I won't beat around the bush.

    • A.

      I won't walk around a bush.

    • B.

      I won't avoid the subject.

    • C.

      I won't avoid the bush.

    • D.

      I won't beat the bush, only around it.

    Correct Answer
    B. I won't avoid the subject.
    Explanation
    The phrase "beat around the bush" is an idiom that means to avoid or delay discussing something directly. The given answer, "I won't avoid the subject," aligns with the meaning of the idiom. It indicates that the speaker will not avoid or evade discussing the topic at hand.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    You and what army!

    • A.

      What army is behind you?

    • B.

      You will need an army's assistance.

    • C.

      You better call the army.

    • D.

      That's impossible!

    Correct Answer
    D. That's impossible!
    Explanation
    This phrase is often used to express disbelief or skepticism towards a statement or situation. It implies that the situation being discussed is highly unlikely or improbable. In this context, it suggests that the idea of someone having an army behind them is so unlikely that it is deemed impossible.

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    Wow, it's raining cats and dogs outside!

    • A.

      It's raining right now!

    • B.

      It's raining and the cats, and dogs are out!

    • C.

      I see cats, dogs, and rain!

    • D.

      It's raining very hard!

    Correct Answer
    D. It's raining very hard!
    Explanation
    The phrase "raining cats and dogs" is an idiom that means it is raining heavily. Therefore, the correct answer "It's raining very hard!" accurately reflects the meaning of the idiom.

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    His bark is worse than his bite.

    • A.

      He acts like a dog to make people angry.

    • B.

      He yells at everybody and does mean things.

    • C.

      He yells, but he does not do mean things.

    • D.

      He barks like a dog and bites people. He needs to be locked up.

    Correct Answer
    C. He yells, but he does not do mean things.
    Explanation
    This phrase means that someone may appear to be aggressive or threatening, but they are actually not harmful or dangerous. The person in question may yell or act tough, but they do not follow through with any harmful actions.

    Rate this question:

Related Topics

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.