Honors Review Quiz For English III Honors Classes: 2008-2009

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Students will use this test to review for their final exam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    List one way in which Slaughterhouse-Five is an anti-narrative. Be specific in your response by using details from the novel. Please note that your response is limited to 250 characters.
  • 2. 
    Please explain one example of metafiction from either Maus I or Maus II. Be specific in your response by using details from the novel, but note that your response is limited to 250 characters.
  • 3. 
    What is the definition of plain style?
    • A. 

      The substitution of a mild, indirect, or vague expression for one thought to be offensive, harsh, or blunt

    • B. 

      A style of writing used by Puritans to imitate the bible

    • C. 

      A person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself

    • D. 

      A style of writing that helps the reader understand how plain the writer is

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      The first section of a work in which we come to find out what drives the action of the story

    • B. 

      The way a character moves and speaks

    • C. 

      The inspiration the author receives to write a work of literature

    • D. 

      The reasons for a character’s behavior

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 5. 
    • A. 

      Something that deceives by producing a false or misleading impression of reality

    • B. 

      Aberration, fantasy, chimera

    • C. 

      The state or condition of being deceived; misapprehension

    • D. 

      A reference to someone or something that is known from history, literature, religion, politics, sports, science, or some other branch of culture

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 6. 
    • A. 

      Any sound considered with reference to its quality, pitch, strength, source, etc

    • B. 

      The attitude a writer takes toward the subject of a work, the characters in it, or the audience

    • C. 

      The pitch of a word used to determine its meaning or to distinguish differences in meaning

    • D. 

      The different colors you see when you read certain words or phrases

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 7. 
    Which of the following choices is a metaphor?
    • A. 

      Her long, full hair resembled the hair of a lioness.

    • B. 

      Her body was just a shell; her true self was within.

    • C. 

      His breath smelled like mustard gas and roses.

    • D. 

      The heart in the human body is like a pump.

  • 8. 
    What is a symbol?
    • A. 

      A person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself

    • B. 

      A letter, figure, or other character or mark or a combination of letters or the like used to designate something

    • C. 

      The use of language to evoke a a picture or a concrete sensation of a person, thing, place, etc

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 9. 
    • A. 

      Stories that recount the kidnapping of settlers by Native Americans

    • B. 

      Stories that describe women as oppressed beings that have been held captive by men

    • C. 

      Stories that have a three part structure that includes enslavement, escape, and freedom

  • 10. 
    • A. 

      The study of language meaning

    • B. 

      Able to speak and write in many languages; multilingual

    • C. 

      Believing in many gods

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 11. 
  • 12. 
    The basic dictionary definition of a word is known as the word's WHAT?
  • 13. 
  • 14. 
     When the speaker in Holmes’s “The Chambered Nautilus” speaks to the shell (an inanimate object), he uses a technique referred to as                                                .
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Dialogue

    • C. 

      Catalog

    • D. 

      Analogy

    • E. 

      Euphemism

  • 15. 
    When Whitman and Dickinson begin multiple lines of verse with the same word, we call this                                                    .
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Free verse

    • C. 

      Catalog

    • D. 

      Anaphora

    • E. 

      Treason

  • 16. 
    Johnny is writing an essay. As he tries to improve his writing, he changes his choice of words many times. For example, he changes “pushy” to “pugnacious.” What is Johnny improving?
    • A. 

      Dialogue

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Paraphrasing

    • D. 

      Semantics

    • E. 

      Etymology

  • 17. 
    Miss Londeree wants her students to do a research project that requires students to find the origin of a specific word, and how the meaning of the word has changed over time. She should ask that students research this word’s                                        .
    • A. 

      Theme

    • B. 

      Symbolism

    • C. 

      Etymology

    • D. 

      Archetype

    • E. 

      Attitude

  • 18. 
    Plays are divided into                                                 , which may include changes of place and time, but generally function as large-scale segments of plot.
    • A. 

      Acts

    • B. 

      Scenes

    • C. 

      Sections

    • D. 

      Paragraphs

    • E. 

      Stanzas

  • 19. 
    In a standard plot of this genre of prose, a white woman is kidnapped and trapped in a Native American society. Her Christianity, strength, and virtue are put to the test. This genre is best defined as...  
    • A. 

      A biography

    • B. 

      An autobiography

    • C. 

      A captivity narrative

    • D. 

      A slave narrative

    • E. 

      A confession

  • 20. 
    Benjamin Franklin was famous for these special sayings, because they were brief and made wise observations about life.
    • A. 

      Aphorisms

    • B. 

      Anachromisms

    • C. 

      Quotations

    • D. 

      Euphemisms

    • E. 

      Kites

  • 21. 
     In “The Raven,” Poe includes images such as a dying fire and rustling curtains, as well the background of night and the month of December, to construct the setting of the poem. The language he uses, along with images which depict the physical setting of poem, help to convey the poem’s                              .
    • A. 

      Atmosphere

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Parallelism

    • D. 

      Irony

    • E. 

      Apostrophe

  • 22. 
      The                  of a story includes the following elements: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.  
    • A. 

      Theme

    • B. 

      Semantics

    • C. 

      Setting

    • D. 

      Plot

    • E. 

      Narration

  • 23. 
    Ben looks at his younger sister Jan and asks “are you stupid?”. Tommy doesn’t expect Jane to answer him. What kind of question did Tommy ask?  
    • A. 

      A stupid question

    • B. 

      A probing question

    • C. 

      A rhetorical question

    • D. 

      A restrictive question

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 24. 
     A story that is told from the third person point of view will always have a                       that is not a character in the book, as opposed to a story told in first person point of view, in which the                      is a main character. (The answer in both blanks is the same term.)  
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Narrator

    • D. 

      Character

    • E. 

      Intruder

  • 25. 
    The killing of Candy’s dog in Of Mice and Men                     the killing of Lennie.  
    • A. 

      Foreshadowed

    • B. 

      Predicted

    • C. 

      Personified

    • D. 

      Symbolized

    • E. 

      Euphemized

  • 26. 
    Dickinson uses              when she gives the soul in her poem a gender and the ability to make decisions.
    • A. 

      Repetition

    • B. 

      Symbolism

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Metaphors

    • E. 

      Modifiers

  • 27. 
    The cliff’s repeated use of the phrase “Give me some tobacco” in “The Origin of Stoies” is an example of                           .  
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Apostrophe

    • C. 

      Repetition

    • D. 

      Alliteration

    • E. 

      Allusion

  • 28. 
    You can learn a lot about the characters in stories through their                       , especially through conversations with other characters.  
    • A. 

      Dialogue

    • B. 

      Semantics

    • C. 

      Asides

    • D. 

      Footnotes

    • E. 

      Body movements

  • 29. 
    Authors employ            to help create a picture or concrete image in the mind of the reader.
    • A. 

      Euphemisms

    • B. 

      Symbolism

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

    • E. 

      None of the above.

  • 30. 
    The desire for enormous audiences has tempted the media to                           the English language.  
    • A. 

      Streamline

    • B. 

      Blend

    • C. 

      Homogenize

    • D. 

      Euphemize

    • E. 

      Industrialize

  • 31. 
    There are four types of                shifts in the English language: specialization, generalization, elevation, and degeneration.
    • A. 

      Semantic

    • B. 

      Dialogue

    • C. 

      Narration

    • D. 

      Setting

    • E. 

      Maneuvering

  • 32. 
     “Passed away” is a                       for died.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Euphemism

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Symbol

  • 33. 
    These stories have a three part structure that includes enslavement, escape, and freedom.
    • A. 

      Captivity narrative

    • B. 

      Feminist narrative

    • C. 

      Interracial narrative

    • D. 

      Slave narrative

    • E. 

      Political narrative

  • 34. 
    To which of the following groups does Edgar Allan Poe belong?
    • A. 

      Southern Gothic Literature

    • B. 

      Transcendentalism Authors

    • C. 

      Harlem Renaissance Authors

    • D. 

      Dark Romantic Literature

  • 35. 
    To which of the following groups does Langston Hughes belong?
    • A. 

      Harlem Renaissance

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic Writers

    • C. 

      Dark Romantics

    • D. 

      Transcendentalists

  • 36. 
    To which of the following groups does Flannery O'Connor belong?
    • A. 

      Dark Romantic Writers

    • B. 

      Transcendentalist Writers

    • C. 

      Southern Gothic Writers

    • D. 

      Fairy Tale Writers

  • 37. 
    The Roots of Modern English: Which of the following theories of language development asserts that speech began when humans started imitating the sounds around them?  
    • A. 

      Ding-dong

    • B. 

      Bow-wow

    • C. 

      Yo-he-ho

    • D. 

      Pooh-pooh

  • 38. 
    Read the following passage from Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken,” then answer the question below.   Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.   Focus on the second line of the passage. The words “I” and “by” in line two represent:
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Assonance

  • 39. 
    Words that connote “something new” are fresh, modern, and innovative.   - Weary of the year’s boring designs, the company was seeking a     look.   Which italicized word from above fits the context of the sentence the best?
    • A. 

      Fresh

    • B. 

      Modern

    • C. 

      Innovative

  • 40. 
    Words that connote “to judge” are assess, discriminate, and censure.   - Holly found it difficult to         between the various shades of light blue.         Which italicized word from above fits the context of the sentence the best?  
    • A. 

      Assess

    • B. 

      Discriminate

    • C. 

      Censure

  • 41. 
    Words that connote “equality” are identical, equivalent, and corresponding.   - Michelle asked what the word                                 to the English “internet” was in French.   Which italicized word from above fits the context of the sentence the best?  
    • A. 

      Identical

    • B. 

      Equivalent

    • C. 

      Corresponding

  • 42. 
    Which of the following types of Native American Oral Narrative “explains the movements of a tribe, and thus frequently recount the colonization of the tribe by Europeans”?  
    • A. 

      Origin and Emergence

    • B. 

      Culture Hero Story

    • C. 

      Historical Narrative

    • D. 

      Trickster Tale

    • E. 

      Captivity Narrative

  • 43. 
    Which of the following types of Oral Narratives dramatizes a people’s beliefs about how “a remarkable individual altered the original world and social order to its culturally accepted form”?
    • A. 

      Origin and Emergence

    • B. 

      Culture Hero Story

    • C. 

      Historical Narrative

    • D. 

      Trickster Tale

    • E. 

      Captivity Narrative

  • 44. 
    Which of the following best describes the setting of the play "The Crucible"?
    • A. 

      1692 Salem, Massachusetts

    • B. 

      1792 Salem, Massachusetts

    • C. 

      1692 Boston, Massachusetts

    • D. 

      1792 Boston, Massachusetts

  • 45. 
    What is a “crucible”?  
    • A. 

      A challenge in which only a very brave person can be victorious

    • B. 

      A severe test or trial

    • C. 

      A situation that demands every character be emotionally vulnerable

    • D. 

      A process that judges right and wrong

  • 46. 
    In Of Mice and Men, which character said: “I ought to of shot that dog myself. I shouldn’t ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog.”
    • A. 

      Candy

    • B. 

      Carlson

    • C. 

      Curley

    • D. 

      Lennie

    • E. 

      George

  • 47. 
    What is metafiction?
    • A. 

      Fiction that is aware that it is fiction

    • B. 

      Fiction that runs multiple story lines simultaneously

    • C. 

      Fiction that uses elevated diction

  • 48. 
    • A. 

      John Steinbeck

    • B. 

      William Faulkner

    • C. 

      F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • D. 

      Mark Twain

  • 49. 
    Of Mice and Men comes full circle when the setting of chapter 6, their campsite by a river, is the same location as the opening of the novella. The atmosphere at the end of the book, however, is different than it was in chapter one. Why?
    • A. 

      The time is night instead of day, which makes the setting drearier than before.

    • B. 

      There are no animals there in chapter 6, and rabbits and other creatures were there before.

    • C. 

      There is an act of violence and death in chapter 6, and things were peaceful in the first chapter

    • D. 

      There have been acts of vandalism at the site when the men return there in chapter 6.

  • 50. 
    The climax of Of Mice and Men is when George shoots Lennie
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 51. 
    In Of Mice and Men, George doesn't let Candy join them in buying the house because it is George and Lennie's private dream to do so.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 52. 
    In Of Mice and Men, Lennie crushes Curley's hand after Curley attacks George.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 53. 
    • A. 

      Beautiful girl

    • B. 

      Heroic man

    • C. 

      Nurturing mother

    • D. 

      Fairy tale kingdom

    • E. 

      All of the above are reversed in her stories

  • 54. 
    • A. 

      "Yet as a rebel fronts a king..."

    • B. 

      "Although she feeds me bread of bitterness..."

    • C. 

      "Darkly I gaze into the days ahead..."

    • D. 

      "I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!"

  • 55. 
    Which of the following terms describes the dictionary definition of a word that does not take into consideration all of its implied meanings?
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Denotation

    • C. 

      Cliche'

    • D. 

      Dichotomy

  • 56. 
    • A. 

      Artie

    • B. 

      Mala

    • C. 

      Francoise

    • D. 

      Mandelbaum

  • 57. 
    • A. 

      First person

    • B. 

      Second person

    • C. 

      Third person

  • 58. 
    “Click,” “boom,” “cheep” and “buzz” are all examples of                                   .            
    • A. 

      Cliché

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • E. 

      Hyperbole

  • 59. 
    Which literary movement asserted the existence of an ideal spiritual reality that transcends the scientific and is knowable through intuition and nature?  
    • A. 

      American Romanticism

    • B. 

      American Renaissance

    • C. 

      Transcendentalism

    • D. 

      Harlem Renaissance

  • 60. 
    “She left me waiting for an eternity” is an example of what figure of speech?  
    • A. 

      Dichotomy

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 61. 
    Which of the following terms describes the origin and historical development of a linguistic form as shown by determining its basic elements, earliest known use, and changes in form and meaning, tracing its transmission from one language to another, identifying its cognates in other languages, and reconstructing its ancestral form?  
    • A. 

      Etymology

    • B. 

      Archetype

    • C. 

      Dystopia

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 62. 
    Which of these terms describes a prose fiction longer than a short story but shorter than a novel?
    • A. 

      Epilogue

    • B. 

      Novella

    • C. 

      Paraphrase

    • D. 

      Free verse

  • 63. 
    Which of these terms is defined as "the act of hiding, removing, altering or destroying so that general public access to it is partially or completely limited"?
    • A. 

      Paraphrasing

    • B. 

      Terrorism

    • C. 

      Censorship

    • D. 

      Stereotyping

  • 64. 
    Which of the following terms is defined as: a play on words based on multiple meanings of a single word or words that sound alike but mean different things?
    • A. 

      Steretype

    • B. 

      Pun

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Biography

    • E. 

      Plot

  • 65. 
    Which type of rhetorical appeal uses the qualifications of and credentials of the speaker?  
    • A. 

      Logos

    • B. 

      Pathos

    • C. 

      Ethos

  • 66. 
    • A. 

      Attacking the person

    • B. 

      Begging the question

    • C. 

      Either-or-reasoning

    • D. 

      False analogy

    • E. 

      Hasty generalization

  • 67. 
    • A. 

      Overstatement

    • B. 

      Either-or-reasoning

    • C. 

      Hasty generalization

    • D. 

      False analogy

    • E. 

      Begging the question

  • 68. 
    • A. 

      Attacking the person

    • B. 

      Begging the question

    • C. 

      Overstatement

    • D. 

      Hasty generalization

    • E. 

      Either-or reasoning

  • 69. 
    • A. 

      Overstatement

    • B. 

      False analogy

    • C. 

      Either-or reasoning

    • D. 

      Hasty generalization

    • E. 

      Attacking the person

  • 70. 
    Which logical fallacy is displayed by the following statement? "Slaughterhouse-Five is the worst book ever written."
    • A. 

      Hasty generalization

    • B. 

      Overstatement

    • C. 

      Either-or reasoning

    • D. 

      False analogy

    • E. 

      Begging the question

  • 71. 
    Which logical fallacy is displayed in the following statement? "Truly Natural Water is the only healthy alternative to sugary, caffeinated drinks."
    • A. 

      Begging the question

    • B. 

      False analogy

    • C. 

      Either-or reasoning

    • D. 

      Attacking the person

    • E. 

      Overstatement

  • 72. 
    Gospel According to Larry:What does pseudocide mean?
    • A. 

      To kill yourself

    • B. 

      To pretend to kill someone

    • C. 

      To pretend to kill yourself

    • D. 

      To plan to commit suicide

  • 73. 
    The Gospel According to Larry: The resolution Josh finds in the end is...
    • A. 

      That he needs to work on himself before he can really change the world.

    • B. 

      ...that he needs to tell Beth and Peter the truth personally.

    • C. 

      ...that he needs to camp out by Walden Pond to find peace.

    • D. 

      ...that he can only find happiness in traveling the world.

  • 74. 
    • A. 

      In the passage, Billy Pilgrim is explaining how he has become unstuck in time. This is metafiction because a character in the Dresden story is explaining how he cannot control his own life.

    • B. 

      In the passage, Kurt Vonnegut is explaining how he tried to make sense of the Dresden story and make in linear. This is metafiction because he explains the process of writing the story within the story itself.

    • C. 

      In the passage, the third person narrator is discussing the art of storytelling in relation to the Dresden story. This is metafiction because it helps to establish the text as an anti-narrative.

  • 75. 
    A protagonist who lacks one or more of the conventional qualities attributed to a hero. Instead of being dignified, brave, idealistic, or purposeful, the             may be cowardly, self-interested, alienated, or weak.  
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Hero

    • D. 

      Antihero

  • 76. 
    Division into two mutually exclusive, opposed, or contradictory groups  
    • A. 

      Antithesis

    • B. 

      Dichotomy

    • C. 

      Catharsis

    • D. 

      Schism

  • 77. 
    State in which the conditions of life are extremely bad as from deprivation or oppression or terror   
    • A. 

      Dystopia

    • B. 

      Dinotopia

    • C. 

      Utopia

    • D. 

      Cornucopia

  • 78. 
    A conclusion added to a literary work such as a novel, play, or long poem  
    • A. 

      Prologue

    • B. 

      Obituary

    • C. 

      Epilogue

    • D. 

      Eulogy

  • 79. 
    A scene in drama or narrative that recounts a prior event  
    • A. 

      Foreshadowing

    • B. 

      Flash forward

    • C. 

      Flashback

    • D. 

      Forewarning

  • 80. 
    An additional piece of information that the author includes at the bottom of a page, usually signaled by a small reference number in the main text.
    • A. 

      Reference

    • B. 

      Anecdote

    • C. 

      Annotation

    • D. 

      Footnote

  • 81. 
    Wavering between humorous and off-putting, a                       character representation might picture a corrupt rural politician as enormously, fat, sweaty, leering, and grasping, each trait serving as a physical counterpart of his moral deformity.  
    • A. 

      Villainous

    • B. 

      Grotesque

    • C. 

      Licentious

    • D. 

      Outlandish

  • 82. 
    We may say “nice wheels” instead of “nice car,” which is an example of…  
    • A. 

      Parallelism

    • B. 

      Euphemism

    • C. 

      Synecdoche

    • D. 

      Fractions

  • 83. 
    “America” by Claude McKay                                                                                                 Line Number: Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,                  1And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth,                      2Stealing my breath of life, I will confess                           3I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!                   4Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,                         5Giving me strength erect against her hate.                     6Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.                      7Yet as a rebel fronts a king in state,                                  8I stand within her walls with not a shred                         9Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.                               10Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,                                     11And see her might and granite wonders there,             12Beneath the touch of Time's unerring hand,                  13           Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.                   14   Which of these lines from Claude McKay’s poem “America” personifies our country?  
    • A. 

      “I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!” (line 4)

    • B. 

      “Yet as a rebel fronts a king…” (line 8)

    • C. 

      “Although she feeds me bread of bitterness…” (line 1)

    • D. 

      “Darkly I gaze into the days ahead…” (line 11)

  • 84. 
    “America” by Claude McKay                                                                                                 Line Number: Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,                  1And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth,                      2Stealing my breath of life, I will confess                           3I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!                   4Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,                         5Giving me strength erect against her hate.                     6Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.                      7Yet as a rebel fronts a king in state,                                  8I stand within her walls with not a shred                         9Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.                               10Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,                                     11And see her might and granite wonders there,             12Beneath the touch of Time's unerring hand,                  13           Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.                   14    The underlined segments of the poem are examples of…  
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Apostrophe

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 85. 
    “America” by Claude McKay                                                                                                 Line Number: Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,                  1And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth,                      2Stealing my breath of life, I will confess                           3I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!                   4Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,                         5Giving me strength erect against her hate.                     6Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.                      7Yet as a rebel fronts a king in state,                                  8I stand within her walls with not a shred                         9Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.                               10Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,                                     11And see her might and granite wonders there,             12Beneath the touch of Time's unerring hand,                  13           Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.                   14    What is the “cultured hell” referred to in line 4 of the poem?  
    • A. 

      A tiger

    • B. 

      America

    • C. 

      Hate

    • D. 

      The future

    • E. 

      None of the above