Germany 1919-45 Quiz - By Dan Guiney

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| By Daniel Guiney
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Daniel Guiney
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Germany 1919-45 Quiz - By Dan Guiney - Quiz

A topic knowledge test for History students from www. Flippinghistory. Net


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    On what date did Hitler become Chancellor in Germany, after which there was a torchlit procession under the Brandenburg Gate?

    • A.

      29th January 1933

    • B.

      30th January 1933

    • C.

      31st January 1933

    • D.

      4th July 1066

    Correct Answer
    B. 30th January 1933
    Explanation
    When Hitler came to power it was through the ballot not the bullet.

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  • 2. 

    On what exact date was the Treaty of Versailles signed? 

    • A.

      11th November 1918

    • B.

      1st January 1919

    • C.

      28th June 1919

    • D.

      25th December 1919

    Correct Answer
    C. 28th June 1919
    Explanation
    Germany was left devastated at the end of the First World War. The Treaty of Versailles imposed enormous penalties on the defeated nation in terms of economic, territorial, military, and social areas. Many had expected a fairer peace based upon Woodrow Wilson’s 14 Points but any hopes of a fairer settlement were soon abandoned.

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  • 3. 

    The Treaty was signed in the palace of Versailles, which was the same place Germany had been declared a nation in 1871. But in which precise room was it signed? 

    • A.

      Hall of Mirrors

    • B.

      Hall of Chairs

    • C.

      Hall of Pillars

    • D.

      Hall of Halls

    Correct Answer
    A. Hall of Mirrors
    Explanation
    Germany had suffered tremendous losses in terms of casualties in four years of horrific fighting and its industry and agriculture had been severely hit by both the war and the peace settlement. West Prussia had been given to Poland, thus cutting Germany in two.

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  • 4. 

    Which socialist who later became regarded as one of the 'November criminals' actually signed the Treaty of Versailles for Germany? 

    • A.

      Bowser

    • B.

      Gustav Bauer

    • C.

      David Bowie

    • D.

      Daddy wouldn't buy me a bow wow wow

    Correct Answer
    B. Gustav Bauer
    Explanation
    There were 3.5 million displaced Germans in the Sudetenland.

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  • 5. 

    What percentage of its European territory did Germany lose after the end of the First World War? (making it even more difficult for them to pay reparations) 

    • A.

      13%

    • B.

      15%

    • C.

      18%

    • D.

      21%

    Correct Answer
    A. 13%
    Explanation
    This meant a smaller population and thus made it harder to meet reparation repayments.

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  • 6. 

    Who was the first President of the new democratic Weimar Republic which replaced the Imperial system in which Germany was ruled by the Kaiser? 

    • A.

      Gustav Stresseman

    • B.

      Jurgen Klopp

    • C.

      Friedrich Ebert

    • D.

      Franz von Papen

    Correct Answer
    C. Friedrich Ebert
    Explanation
    The Kaiser, Wilhelm II, had fled to Holland and it was decided that for the first time Germany would embark upon a democratic form of government – historian Detlev Peukert called this “the noble experiment”. However, right from the start it faced huge difficulties. Thus, the new Republic which was set up in the small town of Weimar (because Berlin, the capital, was deemed too dangerous) was born out of defeat. Many argue that this was a millstone around the neck of the new government and that it struggled to recover from this right from the start.

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  • 7. 

    What is the German word for a forced agreement? This word became widely used to describe the Treaty of Versailles or "indecent peace" as Hitler once called it.

    • A.

      Dicktat

    • B.

      Duck tape

    • C.

      Dictate

    • D.

      Diktat

    Correct Answer
    D. Diktat
    Explanation
    Article 232 was the article which dealt with reparations. At Versailles it was left as a blank cheque. The reality of this meant people lived off turnips which had previously been used only to feed horses, that bread was filled with sawdust to make it go further, and that people drank ersatz (substitute) coffee.

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  • 8. 

    What percentage of its iron industry did Germany lose at the Treaty of Versailles? 

    • A.

      6.7

    • B.

      67

    • C.

      76

    • D.

      7.6

    Correct Answer
    C. 76
    Explanation
    Germany had previously been world leaders in this field with the famous Krupp steelworks.

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  • 9. 

    How long was the Saarland (an area rich in coal and industry) given over to the League of Nations? 

    • A.

      0 years

    • B.

      1 year

    • C.

      5 years

    • D.

      15 years

    Correct Answer
    D. 15 years
    Explanation
    The League also took over the running of former German colonies such as Tanganyika

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  • 10. 

    In what year was the reparations figure which Germany was forced to pay for the First World War finalized? (this might surprise some of you so think about it carefully before you answer).

    • A.

      1918

    • B.

      1919

    • C.

      1920

    • D.

      1921

    Correct Answer
    D. 1921
    Explanation
    Indemnity is another word for reparations.

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  • 11. 

    And what was the figure of these reparations (or indemnity) agreed at Versailles? 

    • A.

      6 billion GBP

    • B.

      6.6 billion GBP

    • C.

      66.6 billion GBP

    • D.

      6.6 billion elephants

    Correct Answer
    B. 6.6 billion GBP
    Explanation
    Bulgaria, another defeted nation, had its reparations completely cancelled.

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  • 12. 

    How small did the German army have to be? (having once been five million strong)

    • A.

      1 soldier

    • B.

      10,000 soldiers

    • C.

      100,000 soldiers

    • D.

      1,000,000 soldiers

    Correct Answer
    C. 100,000 soldiers
    Explanation
    The Germany army was severely restricted and so many Germans felt defenceless in the heart of a vengeful Europe.

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  • 13. 

    How many battleships was Germany allowed? 

    • A.

      0

    • B.

      6

    • C.

      23

    • D.

      100

    Correct Answer
    B. 6
    Explanation
    The remainder being scuttled at Scapa Flow.

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  • 14. 

    Which area was demilitarized for 15 years? 

    • A.

      Black Forest

    • B.

      Bavaria

    • C.

      Saarland

    • D.

      Rhineland

    Correct Answer
    D. Rhineland
    Explanation
    France spoke of "revanche" and a war in perpetuity having been invaded in both 1870 and 1914 by Prussia/Germany. As such they wanted a buffer zone between themselves and Germany.

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  • 15. 

    What was Article 231 of the Treaty of Versailles better known as? 

    • A.

      Colours

    • B.

      Cat's Claws

    • C.

      Santa Claus

    • D.

      War Guilt Clause

    Correct Answer
    D. War Guilt Clause
    Explanation
    This Article treated Germany as the sole nation responsible for the horrors of the war. People referred to those who signed the armistice as the ‘November Criminals’ and the idea of a Dolchstoss came about – this is the belief that Germany (whose soldiers were still on foreign soil at the end of the war) had not been defeated in battle but had been betrayed by people at home. The impact of war, the loss of a Kaiser, and the harsh treaty imposed between January-June 1919 at Versailles combined to make life extremely difficult for the new government.

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  • 16. 

    Which lawyer wrote the Weimar Constitution?

    • A.

      Hugo Preuss

    • B.

      Hugo Boss

    • C.

      Hugo Chavez

    • D.

      Hugo Andmakemeacupoftea

    Correct Answer
    A. Hugo Preuss
    Explanation
    Many countries, such as Britain, have evolved into democracies over thousands of years. Germany on the other hand was attempting to go straight from authoritarianism to democracy in a rapid space of time and some believe this was always going to present difficulties. The new Republic’s constitution, or written set of rules by which to govern, was agreed upon in August 1919 and was the work of lawyer Hugo Preuss (who later died of appendicitis).

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  • 17. 

    Which Article of the Weimar Constitution meant the Reichstag could be dissolved in a national emergency?

    • A.

      8.4

    • B.

      480 Subsection 12b

    • C.

      840

    • D.

      48

    Correct Answer
    D. 48
    Explanation
    Article 48 effectively allowed the President of the Weimar Republic to suspend parliament in times of emergency and many blame this for the Republic’s eventual collapse. The constitution also stated that the Republic would adopt a system known as Proportional Representation (often referred to simply as PR). This was a system whereby political parties gained the same percentage of seats in the Reichstag (German parliament) as votes received. Whilst this seems quite fair it must be considered that this would result in many, many small parties being allowed to form part of the government and led the new Republic to be associated with the problems of pluralism. There were six coalition governments (makeshift governments created when one party could not get a majority in the Reichstag) which undermined the credibility of the Weimar Republic – it had a hard time agreeing upon anything.

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  • 18. 

    In which (modern day) country was Rosa Luxemburg born?

    • A.

      Poland

    • B.

      Karlijnland

    • C.

      Germany

    • D.

      Moldova

    Correct Answer
    A. Poland
    Explanation
    The government allowed the Freikorps (bands of mostly demobilized soldiers with right-wing persuasions who liked to roam the streets) to use force to disband the Spartacists and the attempted revolution was bloodily put down. The two leaders themselves were tortured for several hours before being killed and thrown in a freezing Berlin canal.

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  • 19. 

    Who (most likely) killed Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht? (He was a member of the Freikorps)

    • A.

      Otto Mann

    • B.

      Otto Runge

    • C.

      Otto Otto

    • D.

      Ot Toe

    Correct Answer
    B. Otto Runge
    Explanation
    Now, whilst it is surprising (and some may argue prophetic) that the Weimar Republic allowed for the use of right wing violence on this occasion perhaps what is even more telling is the incredibly lenient sentence dished out to Luxemburg’s killer, Otto Runge, who spent a mere four months in prison for her murder.

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  • 20. 

    How long did Dr. Wolfgang Kapp's right wing Putsch last before it was put down by a general strike?

    • A.

      4 hours

    • B.

      4 days

    • C.

      4 weeks

    • D.

      4 years

    Correct Answer
    B. 4 days
    Explanation
    The first major right wing insurrection was by a New-York born German called Dr. Wolfgang Kapp in what became known as the Kapp Putsch (putsch is a German term for revolution or coup d’état). In March 1920 Kapp and General von Luttwitz attempted to overthrow the government with 12,000 soldiers and members of the Freikorps and revolted in Berlin. Defence Minister Gustav Noske ordered the army or Reichswehr to restore order but General von Seeckt refused to order his troops to attack former soldiers. Trade unions organized a general strike which paralysed the city and forced Kapp to realise his attempt to overthrow the Weimar Republic had failed. He fled to Sweden.

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  • 21. 

    How many SA or Brownshirts were killed in Hitler's November 1923 Munich Beer Hall Putsch? (he himself slipped and broke his collar bone).

    • A.

      2

    • B.

      4

    • C.

      8

    • D.

      16

    Correct Answer
    D. 16
    Explanation
    A second right wing attempt to seize power occurred in November 1923 and was led by Adolf Hitler. This attempt to seize power was known as the Beer Hall Putsch, because it began in a Munich beer hall (which was not as odd as it sounds – it was quite common for people to talk politics and hold political talks in such places). Hitler with 600 SA (Sturmabteilung or Brownshirts) took over a political meeting and announced on 8th November 1923 that he was mounting an effort to take power. Von Kahr, the Bavarian State Commissioner, who had been leading the meeting, escaped. The next day, on 9th November 1923, Hitler took 2,000 SA to the Odeonplatz in the centre of Munich. In the events that followed 16 SA were killed and Hitler simply ran away. In February 1924 Hitler was tried for treason but received a light sentence (which he served in Landsberg jail where he wrote his memoirs called Mein Kampf or My Struggle).

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  • 22. 

    Hitler was sentenced to 5 years in Landsberg Gaol where he wrote Mein Kampf. How many months did he serve in total?

    • A.

      10

    • B.

      12

    • C.

      24

    • D.

      36

    Correct Answer
    A. 10
    Explanation
    As with Otto Runge it was clear the Republic were being fairly lenient on the right wing. This was in part because they sympathized with some of their grievances (such as the diktat) and also because many in power saw the left wing as the greater threat.

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  • 23. 

    France and _________________ invaded the Ruhr because Germany had defaulted on reparations

    • A.

      Britain

    • B.

      Belgium

    • C.

      Russia

    • D.

      Kenya

    Correct Answer
    B. Belgium
    Explanation
    The situation in Germany was dire in 1919 due to the problems of a four year long war which had exhausted the economy, a depleted workforce due to high casualties amongst young working men, and of course the crippling economic terms imposed at Versailles. However, events took a turn for the worse in 1923. Germany had been struggling to pay back the huge indemnity imposed upon it and which it had begun paying in 1921. If it had continued paying the terms of the peace (it was amended in 1929 under the Young Plan) the nation would have still been paying off this debt in the year 1984. The mark had declined in value and Germany defaulted on its payment. France and Belgium which had witnessed the bulk of the fighting, were not prepared to allow for this and Raymond Poincare (who had wanted Germany wiped off the map at Versailles) took the decision to invade Germany on 11th January 1923 to simply take what it could instead. The area they chose to invade was the Ruhr, the rich industrial heartland of Germany. This was clearly a breach of the League of Nations’ rules but it took no action, perhaps because France was so influential in it.

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  • 24. 

    What policy did Germany put in place as a result? This meant downing tools and refusing to work whilst stopping short of active resistance because the army was so puny.

    • A.

      One child

    • B.

      Socialism in one country

    • C.

      Passive resistance

    • D.

      Brexit

    Correct Answer
    C. Passive resistance
    Explanation
    As a result the Weimar Republic (without an army of much use to defend itself) adopted a policy known as ‘passive resistance’ which in effect meant putting down their tools and stopping working in key industries. The French and Belgians couldn’t take what wasn’t being produced – that was the idea.

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  • 25. 

    What economic tragedy did this policy of hyperinflation lead to in 1923 which peaked in the month of November? 

    • A.

      Inflation

    • B.

      Money laundering

    • C.

      Embezzling

    • D.

      Hyperinflation

    Correct Answer
    D. Hyperinflation
    Explanation
    Passive resistance had a huge impact on the German economy which slowed down significantly. As a result the government turned to a policy today referred to as quantitative easing in which they decided to print more money, the result of which was hyperinflation. There are many stories of people burning money because it was cheaper than firewood and of making dresses and kites out of old notes. However, one key figure you might consider remembering is that the value of the mark to the British pound went from a ratio of 20:1 in 1914 to 16,000,000,000,000 in 1923. Unemployment rose from 2% to 23% and many starved and some turned to semi prostitution or crime. This was a disaster for Germany and many people and businesses went bust and lost their savings.

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  • 26. 

    130 Germans were killed during the Franco-Belgian invasion of the Ruhr in 1923. Name one from the list below who was killed for fighting back.

    • A.

      Albert Schlageter

    • B.

      Albert Square

    • C.

      Cesar Boother

    • D.

      Bertie Wooster

    Correct Answer
    A. Albert Schlageter
    Explanation
    He went on to be held up as a martyr type figure in Nazi Germany

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  • 27. 

    Hyperinflation was clearly a disaster for most and led to starvation, crime, and semi prostitution amongst other things. But can you name the German ‘Inflation King’ who actually benefited from it? (pictured)

    • A.

      Richard Branson

    • B.

      Bill Gates

    • C.

      Hugo Stinnes

    • D.

      Donald Trump

    Correct Answer
    C. Hugo Stinnes
    Explanation
    'The inflation King’ Hugo Stinnes actually made money from the crisis! His story was exceptional though and for the vast majority of Germans the end of 1923 was the worst year of their lives economically.

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  • 28. 

    The Dawes Plan of 1924 organized a two year moratorium. What does this mean? 

    • A.

      The German economy was officially dead

    • B.

      Germany did not have to make payments for 2 years - they had a payment 'holiday'

    • C.

      Germany had its war indemnity doubled

    • D.

      All reparation repayments were now cancelled forever

    Correct Answer
    B. Germany did not have to make payments for 2 years - they had a payment 'holiday'
    Explanation
    This was an 800 million marks loan from the USA. Germany was to receive an initial loan of 40 million GBP and was given a two year moratorium (break). In total Germany received 3000 million GBP during 1924-30 and experienced a 17% rise in industrial output. In 1929 the Young Plan further cut down reparations by 25% and annual payments were fixed to run only until 1966, not 1984 as originally requested.

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  • 29. 

    In 1925 a new currency was introduced to combat economic problems. What was it called? 

    • A.

      Kuai

    • B.

      Euro

    • C.

      The Maeve Penny

    • D.

      Rentenmark

    Correct Answer
    D. Rentenmark
    Explanation
    Germany normalized its currency by changing the old mark to the new Rentenmark in 1925. As such by 1928 German production levels were finally back to pre-war level and exports were on the increase.

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  • 30. 

    And what was its highest bill/note?

    • A.

      1

    • B.

      100

    • C.

      1,000

    • D.

      10,000

    Correct Answer
    C. 1,000
    Explanation
    By topping its highest denomination at 1000RM this steadied inflation which we know had been a gigantic issue in 1923.

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  • 31. 

    The Dawes plan had loaned Germany $80m USD. How much did the Young Plan reduce overall payments by? 

    • A.

      0%

    • B.

      25%

    • C.

      50%

    • D.

      75%

    Correct Answer
    B. 25%
    Explanation
    Owen D. Young's middle initial 'D' stood for ... absolutely nothing. It was purely decorative!

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  • 32. 

    What did Gustav Stresemann say Germany was dancing on? (a reference to the danger in loaning so much money from the USA) 

    • A.

      A sandstorm

    • B.

      A typhoon

    • C.

      An earthquake

    • D.

      A volcano

    Correct Answer
    D. A volcano
    Explanation
    Although value in land in Berlin rose by 700% in this period it was dependent on these loans not being called in quickly. In 1928 alone Germany had borrowed 5 billion marks and even at the height of recovery unemployment still stood at 1,000,000.

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  • 33. 

    When the USA called in its loans after the Wall Street Crash of 1929 how many days was Germany given to make full repayment?

    • A.

      9 days

    • B.

      90 days

    • C.

      900 days

    • D.

      9,000 days

    Correct Answer
    B. 90 days
    Explanation
    When the Wall Street Crash hit the world’s stock markets on Black Tuesday in October 1929 the crash hugely impacted the US economy and ensured they called all the loans back in – a tragedy for the Weimar Republic. What is more the USA gave Germany just 90 days to repay them in full. No other power had the money to help and companies went bankrupt and millions were laid off or fired from their jobs. Unemployment rose to 3,000,000 in two years and disillusionment with democracy and the ‘great experiment’ resurfaced. The Nazis for example won 107 seats in the General Election of 1930.

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  • 34. 

    Name one German movie star who starred in Blonde Venus (she fled Nazi Germany and worked in Hollywood)

    • A.

      Jet Li

    • B.

      Tanya Wu

    • C.

      Marlene Dietrich

    • D.

      Dwayne Johnson

    Correct Answer
    C. Marlene Dietrich
    Explanation
    Perhaps the most obvious changes came in the field of culture. Like in America (the period there is known as the ‘Roaring Twenties’ the German people hoped for change and progress in their day to day lives. Movies became incredibly popular and stars from Germany made it big in Hollywood, such as the fantastic actress Marlene Dietrich who starred in The Blonde Venus. American star Josephine Baker was a big hit and she toured Europe with her risqué banana-skirted ‘Dance of the Savages’ (It’s on YouTube).

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  • 35. 

    Which famous Jewish director directed the movie Metropolis?

    • A.

      James Cameron

    • B.

      Steven Spielberg

    • C.

      Fritz Lang

    • D.

      Quentin Tarentino

    Correct Answer
    C. Fritz Lang
    Explanation
    The movie scene was big in Germany also and its most famous director was Fritz Lang, a creative genius of Jewish faith who created epic movies such as Metropolis (with its amazing hand painted sets) – this movie changed cinematography forever. Later in life his wife became a Nazi and left him because of his faith.

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  • 36. 

    Which of the following people was NOT an artist in Weimar Germany?

    • A.

      Otto Dix

    • B.

      Lavinia Millo

    • C.

      Hannah Hoch

    • D.

      Paul Weber

    Correct Answer
    B. Lavinia Millo
    Explanation
    Art changed hugely. Artists like Otto Dix and George Grosz became popular and they painted grotesque anti-war images, significantly influenced by the butchery of the First World War.

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  • 37. 

    Which style of furniture became popular? (It is a very cool style) 

    • A.

      Gibraltan

    • B.

      IKEA

    • C.

      Bauhaus

    • D.

      Sun loungers

    Correct Answer
    C. Bauhaus
    Explanation
    The Bauhaus movement took off and is still incredibly stylish and popular today. 15,000 people visited the first ever Bauhaus exhibition and the famous ’51 chair’ design is one which is very popular today.

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  • 38. 

    What clothing item did Stresemann make fashionable?

    • A.

      Baseball cap

    • B.

      Lounge suit

    • C.

      Top hat

    • D.

      The monocle

    Correct Answer
    B. Lounge suit
    Explanation
    Fashions changed in a liberal sense and a little known fact is that Gustav Stresemann made the lounge suit fashionable!

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  • 39. 

    What unusual thing did Adolf Koch establish in Weimar Germany which the Nazis hated and which was viewed as a symbol of Weimar liberalism going too far?

    • A.

      Naked beaches

    • B.

      Naked shopping

    • C.

      Naked schools

    • D.

      Naked art

    Correct Answer
    C. Naked schools
    Explanation
    Whilst there were undoubtedly big changes in culture it should however be considered that there were some people who opposed these changes. For example some people regarded the growth of jazz music as too decadent and particularly did not like jitterbugging, a close form of dance between men and women at an extremely fast pace. Others saw moral decline in Adolf Koch’s Naked Culture Movement. Koch set up 13 nude colleges with 3,000 students enrolled. To counter these changes in culture organisations such as the Wandervogel grew. This was a little bit like a hiking society and it attracted people who were put off by the growing liberalism of Weimar Culture. Most menacingly of all the Nazi Party, which had only been formed in 1919, began to promote what it called volkgemeinschaft – the idea of a natural organic community – and this began to hold strong appeal for some Germans.

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  • 40. 

    What agreement was signed in good spirit in 1925?

    • A.

      Versailles

    • B.

      Trianon

    • C.

      Washington Naval Agreement

    • D.

      Locarno

    Correct Answer
    D. Locarno
    Explanation
    Germany had been treated as an international pariah at the peace talks in 1919 and many, especially France, did not trust them to play a role in international affairs. Therefore in this respect the Republic has some notable successes. Germany signed the Locarno Pact in the spirit of peace in 1925 and was accepted as a member of the League of Nations in 1926. Moreover, Stresemann managed to remove foreign troops from the Rhineland in 1929. Some on the right wing argued however that the signing of Locarno and joining of the League was a tacit acceptance of Versailles. Nevertheless, Stresemann had been successful in this respect in that Germany was an international player once more.

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  • 41. 

    Who are the Mittelstand?

    • A.

      Working class

    • B.

      Upper class

    • C.

      Middle class

    • D.

      History class

    Correct Answer
    C. Middle class
    Explanation
    The Wall Street Crash in October 1929 devastated the world, not just Germany. People were desperate and starving and many simply lost all of their savings and could not find work. A little known fact is that an American called William Cuno invested all of his money into the market at the last minute trying to prevent the crash (and effectively save the world) – he lost everything. In Germany the massive loans taken out in 1924 and 1929 had to be paid in full within just 90 days and this was to prove impossible, effectively bankrupting the nation. The volcano Stresemann had spoken of had erupted with a violence that few had anticipated. In extreme times people tend to look for extreme solutions and so it is common that extreme political parties, such as Communists and Nazis, should grow in support in such a time. In 1925 55% of Hitler’s SA came from the ranks of the unemployed. Nazi Party membership had stood at 100,000 in 1928 but the crash helped this figure swell especially amongst the middle classes.

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  • 42. 

    What was the figure for German unemployment in July 1932?

    • A.

      0

    • B.

      1.5 million

    • C.

      3 million

    • D.

      6 million

    Correct Answer
    D. 6 million
    Explanation
    In 1932 an eye witness stated “vagrants fill the streets” and the average income had fallen 40% between 1929-32. Industrial production dropped 50%. German people were desperate and Hitler and the Nazis benefitted from this. The Weimar Republic on the other hand was associated with the ills of the international depression.

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  • 43. 

    How many points were there in the Nazis' pre-1933 programme?

    • A.

      20

    • B.

      25

    • C.

      30

    • D.

      50

    Correct Answer
    B. 25
    Explanation
    Hitler offered a simple 25-point programme which outlined the Nazi policy of autarky or self-sufficiency which included ideas such as the creation of public works schemes and a war economy (the German word for this is wehrwirtschaft) and this appealed to many to be the answer to Germany’s economic woes. The Wall Street Crash is often cited by historians as a massive turning point in the fortunes of the Weimar Republic and the Nazis.

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  • 44. 

    Who was the original leader of the German Workers’ Party (DAP) which became the Nazis?

    • A.

      Adolf Hitler

    • B.

      Ernst Rohm

    • C.

      Joseph Goebbels

    • D.

      Anton Drexler

    Correct Answer
    D. Anton Drexler
    Explanation
    In 1921 Hitler replaced Anton Drexler at leader of the Volkische group the DAP (Deutsche Arbeiter Partei or German Workers’ Party).

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  • 45. 

    What was Hitler’s fake membership number when he joined the Nazi Party?

    • A.

      5

    • B.

      55

    • C.

      555

    • D.

      666

    Correct Answer
    C. 555
    Explanation
    He lied about this to make it seem a larger organization than it really was. Within just one year of taking over the party which was soon to become the NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers’ Party or Nazis for short) a US intelligence report was describing him as “the most active political force in Bavaria”.

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  • 46. 

    What was his real number?

    • A.

      5

    • B.

      55

    • C.

      555

    • D.

      666

    Correct Answer
    B. 55
    Explanation
    The same report said “his ability to influence a popular assembly is uncanny” and Hitler often used the technique of seeking a scapegoat – often the Jews and left wing Weimar politicians. C. Zuckmeyer describes how he would “rise higher and higher in crescendo … ‘and whose fault is it? It’s all … the fault … of the Jews!”. Extreme opinions are more likely to be accepted in extreme times. Moreover though Hitler was a decorated soldier, having won the Iron Cross First and Second Class in the First World War in his Bavarian unit. In a post-Versailles Germany stripped of its ability to defend itself and used to authoritarian rule this went down well. He had written Mein Kampf in prison in 1924 during his short spell following the Beer Hall Putsch and outlined several ideas which held popular appeal.

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  • 47. 

    What word specifically means anti-Jewishness?

    • A.

      Xenophobia

    • B.

      Racism

    • C.

      Anti semitism

    • D.

      Persecution

    Correct Answer
    C. Anti semitism
    Explanation
    The DAP had only 50 members in 1921 but 100,000 in 1928, one year before the crash. Much of this was due to anti-semitism in German society.

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  • 48. 

    By 1939 70% of German households had ______________

    • A.

      An internet connection

    • B.

      A radio

    • C.

      An automobile

    • D.

      A subscription to the History Channel

    Correct Answer
    B. A radio
    Explanation
    The Nazis used propaganda in original and unique ways which hugely increased their support. Josef Goebbels was crucial in this in his role as Minister of Propaganda. Rallies were held, particularly in the Zeppelinfeld in Nuremburg, which made people feel part of a greater good and posters portrayed simple, easy to remember messages such as ‘Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Fuhrer’ – ‘one people, one state, one leader’. The radio became an important source of media and by 1939 70% of households had one.

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  • 49. 

    Who funded the Nazi newspaper, Volkischer Beobachter?

    • A.

      Otto van Winkle

    • B.

      Jonas Schweinsteiger

    • C.

      Franz Fingler

    • D.

      Dietrich Eckart

    Correct Answer
    D. Dietrich Eckart
    Explanation
    Volkischer Beobachter had a circulation of 116,000 in 1932.

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  • 50. 

    Which female producer made Nazi movies such as Triumph of the Will and Olympia?

    • A.

      Trude Mohr

    • B.

      Leni Riefenstahl

    • C.

      Irme Grise

    • D.

      Joanna Bormann

    Correct Answer
    B. Leni Riefenstahl
    Explanation
    She later escaped being hanged at the war crime trials and went on to make wildlife movies about gorrillas.

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Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 26, 2017
    Quiz Created by
    Daniel Guiney
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