4th Grade Sound Quiz

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4th Grade Sound Quiz - Quiz


We present you with a 4th-grade sound quiz to see how well you have studied sound. The mountains are indeed alive with the sound of music, and today we’re going to see just how well you can hear them! All you need to do is take the following quiz on music and sound at a fourth-grade level to know if you know more about sound than your average 10-year-old. What are you waiting for? Answer the questions, and we’ll find out once and for all how much you know!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Intensity is a measure of how loud or soft a sound is.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Intensity is indeed a measure of how loud or soft a sound is. It refers to the amount of energy that a sound wave carries per unit area. The higher the intensity, the louder the sound. This can be measured using a decibel scale, which quantifies the intensity level of a sound. Therefore, the given answer is true.

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  • 2. 

    The _______ sends sound wave messages to the brain.

    • A.

      Auditory Nerve

    • B.

      Eardrum

    • C.

      Outer Ear

    • D.

      Ear lobes

    Correct Answer
    A. Auditory Nerve
    Explanation
    The auditory nerve is responsible for sending sound wave messages to the brain. It is a bundle of nerve fibers that transmit electrical signals from the cochlea, a part of the inner ear, to the brain. These electrical signals are generated in response to sound vibrations and are then interpreted by the brain as sound. The auditory nerve plays a crucial role in the process of hearing, allowing us to perceive and understand sounds in our environment.

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  • 3. 

    The amount of energy in a sound wave is called.

    • A.

      Frequency

    • B.

      Amplitude

    • C.

      Intensity

    • D.

      Velocity

    Correct Answer
    B. Amplitude
    Explanation
    The amount of energy in a sound wave is called amplitude. Amplitude refers to the maximum displacement or distance from the equilibrium position of a particle in a sound wave. It represents the intensity or loudness of the sound wave. Higher amplitudes indicate louder sounds with more energy, while lower amplitudes indicate softer sounds with less energy. Frequency, on the other hand, refers to the number of complete cycles or vibrations of a sound wave per unit of time. Intensity is a measure of the power or energy per unit area of the sound wave, and velocity refers to the speed at which the sound wave travels.

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  • 4. 

    _________ is a measure of how high or low a sound is.

    Correct Answer
    Pitch
    pitch
    Explanation
    Pitch is a measure of how high or low a sound is. It refers to the perceived frequency of a sound wave, where a higher pitch corresponds to a higher frequency and a lower pitch corresponds to a lower frequency. Pitch can be determined by the rate at which sound waves vibrate, with faster vibrations resulting in higher pitches and slower vibrations resulting in lower pitches. The term "pitch" can be written in lowercase as "pitch" or in uppercase as "Pitch".

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  • 5. 

    The eardrum vibrates back and forth to make a sound.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The eardrum does not make sound itself, but rather it plays a crucial role in the process of hearing. When sound waves enter the ear, they cause the eardrum to vibrate. These vibrations are then transmitted to the tiny bones in the middle ear, which in turn transmit the vibrations to the fluid-filled cochlea. It is the cochlea that converts these vibrations into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain as sound. Therefore, the eardrum is not responsible for making the sound, but rather for transmitting and amplifying it.

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  • 6. 

    When sound is reflected off an object and bounces back, we hear it again.

    • A.

      Focusing of Sound

    • B.

      Reflection of Sound

    • C.

      Echo

    • D.

      Refraction of Sound

    Correct Answer
    C. Echo
    Explanation
    When sound waves hit a surface, they bounce back and travel back towards the source. This phenomenon is known as reflection of sound. When the reflected sound waves reach our ears, we perceive it as an echo. The echo is the repetition of the original sound, heard after a short delay due to the time taken for the sound waves to travel to the surface and back.

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  • 7. 

    Frequency measures the number of sound waves that pass in one second.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Frequency is a measure of how many sound waves pass through a point in one second. It is commonly measured in hertz (Hz), which represents the number of cycles per second. Therefore, the statement that frequency measures the number of sound waves that pass in one second is true.

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  • 8. 

    The sound waves cause the bones inside the ear to vibrate against the __________.

    Correct Answer
    eardrum
    Eardrum
    ear drum
    Ear drum
    Explanation
    The sound waves cause the bones inside the ear to vibrate against the eardrum. The eardrum, also known as the tympanic membrane, is a thin, sensitive membrane that separates the outer ear from the middle ear. When sound waves enter the ear canal, they cause the eardrum to vibrate. These vibrations are then transmitted to the bones in the middle ear, which amplify the sound and send it to the inner ear for further processing.

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  • 9. 

    Insulation between walls or carpet and fabric in a room are examples of things that

    • A.

      Absorb Sound

    • B.

      Focus Sound

    • C.

      Reflect Sound

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. Absorb Sound
    Explanation
    Insulation between walls or carpet and fabric in a room are examples of things that absorb sound. When sound waves hit these materials, they are absorbed rather than being reflected or focused. This absorption helps to reduce echoes and reverberation in the room, resulting in a quieter and more acoustically comfortable environment.

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  • 10. 

    When objects vibrate, they create sound.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    When objects vibrate, they create sound. This is because vibrations cause the molecules of the object to move back and forth, creating waves of pressure in the surrounding air. These pressure waves then travel through the air as sound waves, which can be detected by our ears. Therefore, it is true that objects create sound when they vibrate.

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  • 11. 

    Vocal cords vibrate inside the ear when sound waves enter.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement is incorrect. Vocal cords do not vibrate inside the ear when sound waves enter. Vocal cords are located in the larynx, not the ear. Sound waves enter the ear and are processed by the ear's complex structure, including the eardrum, middle ear bones, and cochlea. The vibration of the vocal cords produces sound, but it is not directly related to the ear's function in processing sound waves.

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  • 12. 

    When sound is bounced off an object, it is called

    • A.

      Reflection of Sound

    • B.

      Focusing of Sound

    • C.

      Absorption of Sound

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    A. Reflection of Sound
    Explanation
    When sound waves hit an object, they can bounce back in different directions. This phenomenon is known as the reflection of sound. It occurs when the sound waves encounter a surface that is smooth and hard enough to reflect the sound waves back into the surrounding environment. This is similar to how light waves can be reflected off a mirror. The other options, focusing of sound and absorption of sound, do not accurately describe the process of sound bouncing off an object.

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  • 13. 

    Catches the sound waves and focuses them on the eardrum

    • A.

      Hammer, anvil, and stirrup

    • B.

      Eardrum

    • C.

      Outer ear

    • D.

      Inner ear

    Correct Answer
    C. Outer ear
    Explanation
    The outer ear is responsible for catching sound waves and directing them towards the eardrum. It consists of the pinna (visible part of the ear) and the ear canal. The pinna helps in collecting sound waves from the environment and funnels them into the ear canal. The ear canal then carries these sound waves towards the eardrum, which is a thin membrane that vibrates in response to the sound waves. Therefore, the outer ear plays a crucial role in capturing and focusing sound waves onto the eardrum.

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  • 14. 

    When an object takes in sound energy.

    • A.

      Reflection of Sound

    • B.

      Absorption of Sound

    • C.

      Focusing of Sound

    • D.

      Eating of Sound

    Correct Answer
    B. Absorption of Sound
    Explanation
    When an object takes in sound energy, it means that the object is absorbing the sound waves rather than reflecting or focusing them. Absorption of sound occurs when the energy of the sound waves is converted into heat energy within the object. This can happen when the object is made of materials that are good at absorbing sound, such as soft or porous materials. Absorption of sound helps to reduce echoes and reverberations in a space, making the sound clearer and less distorted.

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  • 15. 

    Cupping your hands or yelling into a cone-shaped object are examples of absorption of sound.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Cupping your hands or yelling into a cone-shaped object can both help to absorb sound. When you cup your hands, you create a small space for the sound waves to bounce around in, which reduces the volume and makes it less audible. Similarly, when you yell into a cone-shaped object, the sound waves are directed into a smaller space, causing them to bounce around and lose energy. This absorption of sound is why these actions can help to reduce the volume or make the sound less noticeable.

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