First World War Exam Quiz! Trivia

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Daniel Guiney
D
Daniel Guiney
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 7 | Total Attempts: 2,336
Questions: 85 | Attempts: 228

SettingsSettingsSettings
First World War Exam Quiz! Trivia - Quiz


Do you know anything about the first World War? This quiz might be valuable to you. Concerning this quiz, you need to know which two countries allied with Franz and Wilhelm's rule. Russia aligned with Britain and France to form what agreement, who was the king of Belgium when Germany invaded in 1914, and how was the invasion of Belgium perceived in Britain. This quiz will put your knowledge of the first World War to the test.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    There were celebrations on the streets in parts of Europe in 1914 and it was widely believed it would be a short war, 'over by __________''

    • A.

      Easter

    • B.

      Valentine's Day

    • C.

      Christmas

    • D.

      The start of the football season

    Correct Answer
    C. Christmas
    Explanation
    Many people use the word euphoria to describe the atmosphere in 1914.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    For how many years did the First World War last?

    • A.

      1

    • B.

      2

    • C.

      3

    • D.

      4

    Correct Answer
    D. 4
    Explanation
    The First World War was, however, the bloodiest conflict known to man. It lasted four years, killing around 17 million and causing 20 million casualties.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    On what precise date did a terrorist group assassinate the heir to the Austrian throne?

    • A.

      28th June 1914

    • B.

      28th July 1914

    • C.

      28th August 1914

    • D.

      28th September 1914

    Correct Answer
    A. 28th June 1914
    Explanation
    This took place in Sarajevo in a part of the world known as The Balkans. This event triggered a combination of factors to bring about war.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Who was the Archduke of Austria?

    • A.

      Frankie Howerd

    • B.

      France Germany

    • C.

      Frank Lampard

    • D.

      Franz Ferdinand

    Correct Answer
    D. Franz Ferdinand
    Explanation
    The terrorist group were called The Black Hand.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    When the First World War ended which Article of the Treaty of Versailles laid the blame for the outbreak of the war firmly on Germany?

    • A.

      123

    • B.

      231

    • C.

      312

    • D.

      132

    Correct Answer
    B. 231
    Explanation
    When the war ended Article 231 of the Treaty of Versailles, known as the War Guilt Clause, laid the blame for the war squarely at the feet of the defeated Germany. This was the traditional view. But in the 1920s and 1930s some people revised their opinions and argued that blame should be shared. This is the revisionist view. Then in 1961 a German historian called Fritz Fischer wrote a book which blamed Germany, again, arguing they sought a war of aggression. Another historian, Gerhard Ritter, argued the opposite and said Germany wanted only to maintain the status quo in Europe by supporting Austria. 

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Who was the King of Belgium when Germany invaded on 4th August 1914?

    • A.

      Albert I

    • B.

      Arthur I

    • C.

      Henry I

    • D.

      Duane I

    Correct Answer
    A. Albert I
    Explanation
    In 1839 The Treaty of London was signed. This was an alliance between Britain and Belgium. When Germany marched 750,000 soldiers through Albert I's neutral country on 4th August 1914 they should have known this would bring Britain into the war.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    How was the invasion of Belgium perceived in Britain?

    • A.

      The murder of Belgium

    • B.

      The rape of Belgium

    • C.

      The theft of Belgium

    • D.

      The GBH of Belgium

    Correct Answer
    B. The rape of Belgium
    Explanation
    50,000 soldiers and 6,000 civilians died in what became known as The Rape of Belgium. The German Chancellor Bethmann-Hollweg simply called the treaty a "scrap of paper".

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Which plan would see Germany invade France through Belgium in order to avoid a long term two front war?

    • A.

      Moltke Plan

    • B.

      Big stick policy

    • C.

      Plan 17

    • D.

      Schlieffen Plan

    Correct Answer
    D. Schlieffen Plan
    Explanation
    As a future French leader would say "one thing is for certain, they will not say Belgium invaded Germany." This suggests the war was the fault of German aggression. Von Moltke's predecessor, Von Schlieffen, had already designed a plan for a European war back in 1905. This involved attacking France through neutral Belgium, defeating them in just six weeks, before turning the might of the German army against Russia in the east. 

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    In 1871 France was decisively beaten by Prussia in a war that led to the creation of Germany. Germany took the area of Alsace-Lorraine and forced the French to pay, known as an indemnity. It was said that 'Europe had lost a mistress and gained a ____________'

    • A.

      Baker

    • B.

      Professor

    • C.

      Master

    • D.

      Pussycat

    Correct Answer
    C. Master
    Explanation
    Many in France, including Rene Viviani and especially Raymond Poincare, sought revanchist action - i.e. revenge. Some people spoke of 'war in perpetuity' and even today Germany Vs France football matches have an 'edge' to them! To prevent France from attacking the German Chancellor, Otto Von Bismarck, made an alliance with Austria-Hungary in 1879.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    The Dual Alliance was between Franz Josef and Wilhelm. Which two countries did they rule?

    • A.

      Germany and Russia

    • B.

      Britain and France

    • C.

      Austria Hungary and Germany

    • D.

      Italy and Japan

    Correct Answer
    C. Austria Hungary and Germany
    Explanation
    In 1879 Germany and Austria-Hungary made an agreement to support one another in the event either were attacked. This was known as the Dual Alliance. This act between Franz Josef and Wilhelm was the first important step in the growth of the system of alliances. 

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    Britain created a new type of battleship in the naval race that made all others obsolete. What was it called?

    • A.

      Dreadnought

    • B.

      Fearnone

    • C.

      Notscared

    • D.

      Noterror

    Correct Answer
    A. Dreadnought
    Explanation
    It was invented in 1906 under Admiral George Callaghan.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    Russia allied with Britain and France, forming the Triple ____________

    • A.

      Agreement

    • B.

      Alliance

    • C.

      Friendship

    • D.

      Entente

    Correct Answer
    D. Entente
    Explanation
    This was formed in 1907.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    In a 1908 interview with a British newspaper Kaiser Wilhelm II described himself as a "friend of England." Which newspaper?

    • A.

      The Times

    • B.

      The Daily Telegraph

    • C.

      The Guardian

    • D.

      The Sun

    Correct Answer
    B. The Daily Telegraph
    Explanation
    He pointed out in the interview that if he were not a friend he would have helped British enemies in the Boer War.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    In his free time the Kaiser would draw blueprints of battleships and dreamed of a large navy. Under their Admiral Alfred Von Tirpitz Germany's parliament passed how many separate Naval Bills between 1898 to 1912?

    • A.

      5

    • B.

      10

    • C.

      15

    • D.

      50

    Correct Answer
    A. 5
    Explanation
    These increased the size of their fleet to include 17 modern Dreadnought Battleships, 5 Battlecruisers, 25 Cruisers, 40 Submarines, and 20 older Battleships with a navy personnel of 79,000. The Kiel canal was widened so that Dreadnoughts could have easier access to British North Sea shores. This was a direct challenge to Britain which had always had naval supremacy.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    The British navy had followed the _______ Power Standard, meaning the navy had to be twice the size of its nearest competitors.

    • A.

      One

    • B.

      Two

    • C.

      Three

    • D.

      Four

    Correct Answer
    B. Two
    Explanation
    By 1914 Britain had 29 Dreadnoughts with a total navy personnel of 209,000 under the charge of Callaghan (who was soon sacked and replaced by Jellicoe). Dreadnoughts could travel at 21 knots and were equipped with five 12 inch guns, twenty five 12 pde guns, and five 18 inch torpedo tubes. Moreover, the British navy had followed the Two Power Standard, meaning the navy had to be twice the size of its nearest competitors. This is an example of militarism.

    Rate this question:

  • 16. 

    German overseas territories did not include which of the following?

    • A.

      Cairo

    • B.

      Tanganyika

    • C.

      Namibia

    • D.

      The Carolines

    Correct Answer
    A. Cairo
    Explanation
    Germany and Wilhelm II became jealous of other European powers' Empires and wanted a 'place in the sun.' German possessions in places like Tanganyika and Namibia (since 1884) were not seen as nearly enough. Namibia for example was largely desert, whereas British interests included neighbouring South Africa, whose diamonds made it more profitable.

    Rate this question:

  • 17. 

    Britain's King George V had a dragon in national colours tattooed onto his body

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Britain was a very nationalistic country - the King did this in 1882.

    Rate this question:

  • 18. 

    Kaiser Wilhelm II and Bethmann-Hollweg offered Austria a 'blank ________' of support when they decided to declare war on Serbia.

    • A.

      Loan

    • B.

      Payment

    • C.

      Credit card

    • D.

      Cheque

    Correct Answer
    D. Cheque
    Explanation
    It can be argued they did this to start a war which would involve Russia and France. Germany had offered Austria its "full support" in a meeting at Potsdam as early as 5th July 1914. Why would they do this, knowing Serbia was allied to Russia, and in turn Russia to France and Britain?

    Rate this question:

  • 19. 

    Germany was seen as a 'land rat' and Britain a '_________ rat'.

    • A.

      Cloud

    • B.

      Air

    • C.

      Water

    • D.

      Space

    Correct Answer
    C. Water
    Explanation
    At the start of 1914 Germany had an army of 4,500,000 soldiers. So too did Russia but with many more in reserve. By comparison the British under French had only 100,000 soldiers in the British Expeditionary Force which the German Kaiser describes as contemptible. The French under Joffre had 800,000 soldiers. Germany was seen as a 'land rat' and Britain a 'water rat'. 

    Rate this question:

  • 20. 

    What was the French Plan in the event of a German invasion?

    • A.

      Plan 15

    • B.

      Plan 16

    • C.

      Plan 17

    • D.

      Plan 18

    Correct Answer
    C. Plan 17
    Explanation
    In 1913 France had drawn up a strategy to invade Germany, known as Plan 17. This suggests people in France's army, such as Joffre, were expecting war. 

    Rate this question:

  • 21. 

    Just one month into the war in 1914 German Chancellor Bethmann-Hollweg wrote up the ____________ Programme.

    • A.

      September

    • B.

      October

    • C.

      November

    • D.

      December

    Correct Answer
    A. September
    Explanation
    This was a list of territories Germany hoped to conquer in the war. The speed of this suggests Germany had planned the war as a war of expansion. 

    Rate this question:

  • 22. 

    Aggressive and bitter. He had an English doctor who he thought caused his lifelong withered left arm which was about six inches shorter than the right one. (He tried to hide this by holding gloves or a sword in photographs). His mother was born in Buckingham Palace and he was a grandson of Queen Victoria. He only wore English underwear, drew blueprints for battleships, and was fond of chopping down trees. Who is he?

    • A.

      Prince Charles

    • B.

      Franz Josef

    • C.

      George V

    • D.

      Wilhelm I

    Correct Answer
    D. Wilhelm I
    Explanation
    In an interview with a British newspaper in 1908 the Kaiser insulted them by calling them "mad, mad, mad as March hares."

    Rate this question:

  • 23. 

    On 8th December 1912 a German Imperial War Council took place. Which historian believes this was when the Kaiser Wilhelm II decided to deliberately engineer a European war.

    • A.

      Fritz Fischer

    • B.

      Gary Sheffield

    • C.

      Richard Holmes

    • D.

      James Joll

    Correct Answer
    A. Fritz Fischer
    Explanation
    In attendance at the meeting were Admiral Von Tirpitz and General Von Moltke.

    Rate this question:

  • 24. 

    Which country had the largest Empire in the world before the outbreak of war?

    • A.

      Spain

    • B.

      France

    • C.

      Germany

    • D.

      Britain

    Correct Answer
    D. Britain
    Explanation
    By 1900 Britain and France had huge empires in many continents in order to provide raw materials to feed industrial growth. Just some of Britain's colonies in 1914 included India, Canada, Australia, Guyana, Malaysia, South and East Africa, Sierra Leone, New Guinea, and Nigeria. Britain was the elite Imperial power. 

    Rate this question:

  • 25. 

    On 31st July 1914 Russia mobilised its army following a series of written _____________ between Nicholas and Wilhelm.

    Correct Answer
    Letters, letters, telegrams, correspondence, messages, notes, communications
    Explanation
    This can be seen as provocative by Nicholas II and Sergey Sazanov. "The whole weight of responsibility lies solely on your shoulders", wrote Wilhelm to Nicholas in regard to this.

    Rate this question:

  • 26. 

    What was Franz Ferdinand's driver's name?

    • A.

      Hamilton

    • B.

      Lojka

    • C.

      Rosberg

    • D.

      Vettel

    Correct Answer
    A. Hamilton
    Explanation
    Franz Ferdinand and his Austrians were visiting Bosnia on 28th June 1914, a hotbed of nationalism and Slavic terrorism. It can be argued this was a bad idea and that the assassination attempt was obvious. Moreover if the driver Lojka had known the way history might have turned out very differently!

    Rate this question:

  • 27. 

    What was the nickname of the head of the Black Hand?

    • A.

      The Wasp

    • B.

      The Fly

    • C.

      The Bee

    • D.

      The Midge

    Correct Answer
    C. The Bee
    Explanation
    The July Crisis began when a Bosnian Serb called Gavrilo Princip shot dead the future Emperor of Austria-Hungary, the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (as well as his wife Sophie), on 28th June 1914. It could be argued Austria had no choice but to respond militarily by going to war with Serbia at 11.00am on 28th July 1914 because of this nationalism in the Balkans. Surely that actions of people like Apis, Cabrinovich and Ilic couldn't go unpunished? 

    Rate this question:

  • 28. 

    Which one of Austria's 10 point ultimatum did Serbia not agree to?

    • A.

      1st

    • B.

      3rd

    • C.

      6th

    • D.

      11th

    Correct Answer
    A. 1st
    Explanation
    Austria had long been looking for an excuse to start a war against Serbia. This is known as a casus belli. The murder of Franz Ferdinand gave them this opportunity. As one Austrian said "If you have a poisonous adder at you heel, you stamp on its head, you don't wait for it to bite". Austria's Count Berchtold issued Serbia with only 48 hours to reply to its 10 point ultimatum on 23rd July 1914 and even Emperor Franz Josef felt it was very harsh. In the end Serbia agreed to all of the points except No. 6 - which would have meant Austrian officials meddling in internal affairs. No country could accept these terms. 

    Rate this question:

  • 29. 

    Austrian Emperor Franz Josef once featured in a Tom & Jerry episode.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    At 84 he was the oldest reigning Monarch in Europe and ruled 45,000,000 subjects. He had suffered some personal tragedies: his brother was executed, his son killed himself, and his wife was assassinated. Although he considered Sophie 'beneath' Franz Ferdinand he eventually alloweded them to marry but insisted on her being treated differently at court because of her lower standing.

    Rate this question:

  • 30. 

    In which car was Franz Ferdinand travelling?

    • A.

      Phaeton

    • B.

      Mitsubishi

    • C.

      Fiat

    • D.

      Vauxhall

    Correct Answer
    A. Phaeton
    Explanation
    He was in the third of four cars (a phaeton) in an overtop motorcade when the first bomb was launched. His driver then sped off and took a wrong turn, leaving Appel Quay, which is where 19 year old Gavrilo Princip shot him in the neck.  Ironically, he had been a leading voice for peace.

    Rate this question:

  • 31. 

    What word describes a marriage where a Royal marries a commoner?

    • A.

      Wilkinsiatic

    • B.

      Jonesiatic

    • C.

      Morganatic

    • D.

      Smithiatic

    Correct Answer
    C. Morganatic
    Explanation
    Sophie Chotek was the 46 year old wife of the Emperor of Austria-Hungary, Franz Ferdinand. She was from a lower social status than her husband (this is called a morganatic marriage) and had to marry holding left hands, not right and her husband's father (the Emperor) and brothers did not attend the wedding. At family get togethers she had to enter the room last and was not normally allowed to sit next to her husband in public. Because she was not regarded as her husband's equal she was buried 18 inches below him and her tomb has a pair of gloves on it to show she was a lady in waiting and not a princess.

    Rate this question:

  • 32. 

    Gavrilo Princip was the first member of the Black Hand.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    He was a 19 year old suffering from tuberculosis (which will eventually kill in 1918) who believed in the concept of pan-Slavism. From a poor farming background, he lost six siblings in childhood, and had been expelled from school before joining the terrorist branch of a group called Young Bosnia. This branch is known as The Black Hand and its motto is "union or death." It was he who fired the shots that killed the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie Chotek on Franz Josef Street in Sarajevo. (Contrary to what many people might tell you - he was not eating a sandwich at the time). He had been angry at Austrian rule and hoped the assassination would cause Austria to leave Bosnia. After the assassination he swallowed cyanide which had expired because it was old and tried to shoot himself but the pistol was wrestled from his hand. Instead he was given a 20 year sentence in Theresienstadt prison. He weighed a little over 6 stone when he died, in 1918. He stated however "I regret nothing."

    Rate this question:

  • 33. 

    Who painted 'Bravo Belgium?'

    • A.

      Pablo Picasso

    • B.

      F H Townsend

    • C.

      David Low

    • D.

      Otto Dix

    Correct Answer
    B. F H Townsend
    Explanation
    King Albert of Belgium had a determined army of just 43,000. He was 39 with three children and married to Elisabeth, who was German! During the war 90% of his nation was overran with fighting. He did, however, actually fight himself and even let his 14 year old son fight too! A famous British cartoon called 'Bravo, Belgium!' by F. H. Townsend portrayed him as a small but determined child carrying a stick defending his land against a big German bully with sausages hanging from him. 

    Rate this question:

  • 34. 

    Which nation's army was nicknamed the 'steamroller'?

    • A.

      Russia

    • B.

      Serbia

    • C.

      Germany

    • D.

      Britain

    Correct Answer
    A. Russia
    Explanation
    General Sukholinov had an army of 4,500,000 with millions more in reserve which is why they were nicknamed 'the steamroller' but it will take Russian troops an average of 800 miles to get to the border (four times longer than Germany.)

    Rate this question:

  • 35. 

    After the Battle of the Marne a war of ____________ set in.

    • A.

      Abrasian

    • B.

      Attrition

    • C.

      Erosion

    • D.

      Longshore drift

    Correct Answer
    B. Attrition
    Explanation
    The First World War was a war like no other. Previous wars were fought by cavalry on horseback and there was a lot of movement. The early stages of the 1914-18 conflict followed this pattern, with Germany making a lot of progress.  However, during the Battle of the Marne both sides dug trenches into the ground and this meant the war became one which favoured the defender. As such a war of attrition came about where neither side could make significant gains without suffering terrible losses. In particular machine guns meant the advantage was with the defender rather than the attacker.

    Rate this question:

  • 36. 

    By November 1914 there was a continuous line of trenches covering __________ miles from Switzerland to the North Sea.

    • A.

      4

    • B.

      40

    • C.

      400

    • D.

      4,000

    Correct Answer
    C. 400
    Explanation
    For this reason the First World War is commonly associated with trench warfare - there was stalemate between the two opposing sides.

    Rate this question:

  • 37. 

    What phrase meant attacking enemy trenches by going through no-man's land?

    • A.

      Around the side

    • B.

      Under the bottom

    • C.

      Through the middle

    • D.

      Over the top

    Correct Answer
    D. Over the top
    Explanation
    There were many lines of German trenches on one side and many lines of Allied trenches on the other. The distance between trenches could vary from several hundreds of yards to just 30 yards (at Vimy Ridge). In the middle was no-man's land, so-called because it didn't belong to either army. Soldiers crossed no-man's land when they wanted to attack the other side. This was known as going 'over the top'.

    Rate this question:

  • 38. 

    More soldiers died in trenches than from going over the top.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Whilst going 'over the top' accounted for many, many deaths it should also be remembered that one third of Allied casualties were sustained in the trenches themselves.

    Rate this question:

  • 39. 

    What did soldiers put on their feet to prevent getting trenchfoot?

    • A.

      Seal oil

    • B.

      Penguin oil

    • C.

      Whale oil

    • D.

      Otter oil

    Correct Answer
    C. Whale oil
    Explanation
    Trench foot was a fungal foot infection caused by cold and wet conditions. Feet would become numb, turn red (erythema) or blue (cyanosis), swell, blister, and decay. They could turn gangrenous and result in amputation. To prevent this soldiers would be paired and each made responsible for the feet of the other. Whale oil was often used to keep feet dry and soldiers would wrap their legs up in bandages known as puttees to help prevent trench foot. 

    Rate this question:

  • 40. 

    Special Rum Distribution (SRD) jars were jokingly referred to in what way?

    • A.

      Soldier's Rue Deutschland

    • B.

      Slowly Reducing Drink

    • C.

      So Rather Drunk

    • D.

      Seldom Reaches Destination

    Correct Answer
    D. Seldom Reaches Destination
    Explanation
    Breakfast was usually served at 7.00am (bacon and tea on many occasions). This depended on communication being good though and hot food was rare in the front line. On the occasions it was provided it would be cooked on mobile field cookers. It was important that smoke from fires was masked so as to not give away a position. Sometimes there was an unofficial truce during breakfast hours. Soldiers received more calories than people back home. Moreover, The Red Cross sent food parcels and men were issued with a daily tot of rum. Containers of this carried the label SRD which was short for 'Special Rum Distribution' but many soldiers joked it stood for 'Seldom Reaches Destination' on account of how many were destroyed by shelling. 

    Rate this question:

  • 41. 

    What did many soldiers join up in?

    • A.

      Pal's Batallions

    • B.

      Mate's Batallions

    • C.

      Mucker's Batallions

    • D.

      Friends' Batallions

    Correct Answer
    A. Pal's Batallions
    Explanation
    Death was a constant companion. 10% of all the soldiers who fought were killed. That's more than double the percentage for the Second World War (4.5%). Moreover, 56% of soldiers were wounded in the First World War. It would have been difficult for soldiers to watch their countrymen die, especially as many of them had joined up in Pals' Battalions - groups of friends and colleagues who knew each other very well. 

    Rate this question:

  • 42. 

    Shellshock was a widely accepted medical condition.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The noise and fear of shellfire was ever-present. Likewise the screams of dying horses and soldiers lying helplessly in no-man's land was psychological torture. As a result a nervous disease known as shellshock effected many of the men, although only one British Regiment (the Norfolk Regiment) officially recognised it. Shellshock took a number of forms. The Army however assumed this was cowardice and did not recognise it as a form of battle trauma. 80,000 British soldiers suffered from this. That's about 2% of those who did active service. 

    Rate this question:

  • 43. 

    A word given to a self-inflicted wound.

    • A.

      Jerry Wound

    • B.

      Tommy Wound

    • C.

      Poilu Wound

    • D.

      Boche Wound

    Correct Answer
    B. Tommy Wound
    Explanation
    Some soldiers deliberately inflicted wounds on themselves so they could leave the front line. These were referred to as 'Tommy wounds' and if somebody lost a thumb or was shot in the foot it was said they had 'copped a Tommy'. Can you imagine how terrible conditions must have been to make people do this? 

    Rate this question:

  • 44. 

    Soldiers were ordered to climb up on the fire step to guard against a dawn raid by the enemy with their bayonets fixed. What was this known as?

    • A.

      Sit down

    • B.

      Stand to

    • C.

      Roll over

    • D.

      Hop along

    Correct Answer
    B. Stand to
    Explanation
    This took place an hour before dawn each day.

    Rate this question:

  • 45. 

    What colour enveloped meant a soldier's letter would not be censored?

    • A.

      Green

    • B.

      Red

    • C.

      Yellow

    • D.

      Orange

    Correct Answer
    A. Green
    Explanation
    Soldiers would write letters home. The war meant it was actually faster to send a letter from France to London than it is today (!) and soldiers would sometimes be given green envelopes which meant they would not be censored (although the vast majority of letters home were censored for security reasons as well as national morale). 

    Rate this question:

  • 46. 

    Both sides would relieve tension with machine gun fire, shelling, and small arms fire. What was this known as?

    • A.

      Evening wistfulness

    • B.

      Afternoon joy

    • C.

      Morning hate

    • D.

      Mid-day blues

    Correct Answer
    C. Morning hate
    Explanation
    18 pound shells could cause terrifying damage. Many British shells were however duds due to problems in munitions factories and even in the events where they were not they did little damage to enemy barbed wire which simply went up and came down again.

    Rate this question:

  • 47. 

    Pilots, known as 'aces', would engage in catfights.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    Aircraft such as German Fokkes flew over no-man's land on spying missions known as reconnaissance. They would sometimes engage in battle - known as dogfights - but more commonly took photographs of enemy trench layout. 

    Rate this question:

  • 48. 

    A machine gun could outfire a standard Lee Enfield bolt action rifle by how many round per minute?

    • A.

      600 to 1

    • B.

      600 to 15

    • C.

      600 to 500

    • D.

      600 to 300

    Correct Answer
    B. 600 to 15
    Explanation
    They also had a longer range (4,100m compared to 2,743m). This meant the advantage was always with the defender as soldiers could not carry machine guns (a Vickers typically required a six to eight man team to operate it). The mathematicians amongst you might wish to calculate how many bullets per second a machine gun could fire - the answer is terrifying and helps explain why it was so difficult to launch a successful infantry assault.

    Rate this question:

  • 49. 

    Water rations were sometimes stored in petrol canisters.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Giving them the unmistakeable after taste of petroleum.

    Rate this question:

  • 50. 

    What disease did lice cause?

    • A.

      Trench fever

    • B.

      Trench foot

    • C.

      Shellshock

    • D.

      Dysentery

    Correct Answer
    A. Trench fever
    Explanation
    Lice was a never-ending problem. Clothes would be deloused but eggs could be hidden in seams and within hours body heat would cause the eggs to hatch. The lice then caused trench fever, a very painful disease. 

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • May 13, 2017
    Quiz Created by
    Daniel Guiney
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.