Final Exam Study Guide For English I

68 Questions | Total Attempts: 148

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English Final Quizzes & Trivia

Final Exam Study Guide for English I


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    It describes the qualitycan come before nouns: a new car state or action that a noun refers to.can come after verbs such as be, become, seem, look, etc.: that car looks fastcan come after verbs such as be, become, seem, look, etc.: that car looks fast can be modified by adverbs: a very expensive car They can be used as complements to a noun: the extras make the car expensive
    • A. 

      Verbs

    • B. 

      Adverbs

    • C. 

      Adjective

  • 2. 
    The act of alluding; indirect reference: Without naming names, the candidate criticized the national leaders by allusion.
    • A. 

      Abbreviation

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Appositive

  • 3. 
    A person, or a group of people who oppose the main character, or the main characters.'[2] In the classic style of story wherein the action consists of a hero fighting a villain,
    • A. 

      Protagonist

    • B. 

      Antagonist

    • C. 

      Appositive

  • 4. 
    A noun or noun phrase that renames another noun right beside it It can be a short or long combination of words. Look at these examples: The insect, a cockroach, is crawling across the kitchen table.
    • A. 

      Appositive

    • B. 

      Character

    • C. 

      Conflict

  • 5. 
    Is a word that means the opposite of another. eg: 'fat' is 'thin'
    • A. 

      Antonym

    • B. 

      Synonym

    • C. 

      Homonym

  • 6. 
    A professional poet, paid by a monarch to praise the sovereign's activities. one who who performed songs whose lyrics told stories about distant places or about real or imaginary historical events. created their own tales, often they would memorize and embellish the works of others. Frequently they were retained by royalty and high society. As the courts became more sophisticated, minstrels were eventually replaced at court by the troubadours, and many became wandering minstrels, performing in the streets and became well liked until the middle of the Renaissance, despite a decline beginning in the late 15th century.
    • A. 

      "musician" or musical proformer

    • B. 

      "bard” or minstrel

    • C. 

      Homeric simile

  • 7. 
    Short stories use few characters.  One character is clearly central to the story with all major events having some importance to this character.The opposer of the main character i
    • A. 

      Persons in a work of fiction - Static Character and Dynamic Character

    • B. 

      Persons in a work of fiction - Round Character and Flat Character

    • C. 

      Persons in a work of fiction - Antagonist and Protagonist

  • 8. 
    1.  Individual - round, many sided and complex personalities. 2.  Developing - dynamic,  many sided personalities that change, for better or worse, by the end of the story. 3.  Static - Stereotype, have one or two characteristics that never change and are emphasized e.g. brilliant detective, drunk, scrooge, cruel stepmother, etc. A  person in a story. The person in a work of fiction.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      External

    • C. 

      Characters

  • 9. 
    A major character in a work of fiction who encounters conflict and is changed by it. They tend to be more fully developed and described than flat, or static, characters. If you think of the characters you most love in fiction, they probably seem as real to you as people you know in real life. This is a good sign that they are round characters. A writer employs a number of tools or elements to develop a character, making him or her round, including descriptions and dialogue. A character's responses to conflict and his or her thoughts are also revelatory
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

  • 10. 
    Are minor characters who do not ...   as it applies to short story writers and novelists.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Static Character

    • C. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 11. 
    Are minor characters in a work of fiction who do not undergo substantial change or growth in the course of a story. Also referred to as "two-dimensional characters" or "flat characters," they play a supporting role to the main character, who as a rule should be round, or complex. Though we don't generally strive to write static characters, they are often necessary in a story, along with round characters. Take, for example, Mr. Collins in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. He serves a vital role in the story of how Elizabeth and Darcy get together, and he provides comedy, but his character stays essentially unchanged. (In fact, that’s part of what makes him funny.)
    • A. 

      Static Character

    • B. 

      Dynamic Character

    • C. 

      Stereotype Character

  • 12. 
    Character is a major character in a work of fiction who encounters conflict and is changed by it tend to be more fully developed and described than flat, or static, characters. If you think of the characters you most love in fiction, they probably seem as real to you as people you know in real life. A number of elements in fiction reveal character including descriptions of a character, the character's dialogue, a character's responses to the conflicts that arise in the plot, and a character's thoughts.
    • A. 

      Conflict

    • B. 

      Static Character

    • C. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 13. 
    Is a character, with generalized traits (characteristics that make the character a group representative rather than an individual).
    • A. 

      Stereotype Character

    • B. 

      Epithet

    • C. 

      Figurative language

  • 14. 
    This is a word that causes most of us a great degree of discomfort, anger, frustration, sadness, and pain. 
    • A. 

      Medias res

    • B. 

      Dominant

    • C. 

      Conflict

  • 15. 
    It is essential to plot.  It is the opposition of forces which ties one incident to another and makes the plot move.  Conflict is not merely limited to open arguments; rather it is any form of opposition that faces the main character. Within a short story there may be only one central struggle, or there may be one dominant struggle with many minor ones.
    • A. 

      Calm

    • B. 

      Resolution

    • C. 

      CONFLICT

  • 16. 
    A struggle with a force outside one's self.
    • A. 

      Internal conflict

    • B. 

      External conflict

  • 17. 
    A struggle within one's self; a person must make some decision, overcome pain, quiet their temper, resist an urge, etc.
    • A. 

      Internal conflict

    • B. 

      External conflict

  • 18. 
    The leading character struggles with his physical strength against other men, forces of nature, or animals.
    • A. 

      Man vs. Himself/Herself

    • B. 

      Man vs. Society

    • C. 

      Man vs. Circumstances

    • D. 

      Man vs. Man

  • 19. 
    The leading character struggles against fate, or the circumstances of life facing him/her.
    • A. 

      Man vs. Circumstances

    • B. 

      Man vs. Society

    • C. 

      Man vs. Himself/Herself

    • D. 

      Man vs. Man

  • 20. 
    The leading character struggles against ideas, practices, or customs of other people.
    • A. 

      Man vs. Circumstances

    • B. 

      Man vs. Man

    • C. 

      Man vs. Himself/Herself

    • D. 

      Man vs. Society

  • 21. 
    The leading character struggles with himself/herself; with his/her own soul, ideas of right or wrong, physical limitations, choices, etc.
    • A. 

      Epithet

    • B. 

      Man vs. Himself/Herself

    • C. 

      Epic

  • 22. 
    Its most specific sense is a genre of classical poetry originating in Greece. The conventions of this genre are several: (a) It is a long narrative about a serious or worthy traditional subject. (b) Its diction in elevated in style. It employs a formal, dignified, objective tone and many figures of speech. (c) The narrative focused on the exploits of a hero or demigod who represents the cultural values of a race, nation, or religious group. (d) The hero's success or failure will determine the fate of that people or nation. (e) The action takes place in a vast setting, and covers a wide geographic area. The setting is frequently some time in the remote past. (f) The action contains superhuman feats of strength or military prowess. (g) Gods or supernatural beings frequently take part in the action to affect the outcome. (h) The poem begins with the invocation of a muse to inspire the poet, a prayer to an appropriate supernatural being. The speaker asks that this being provide him the suitable emotion, creativity, or words to finish the poem. (i) The narrative starts in medias res, in the middle of the action. Subsequently, the earlier events leading up to the start of the poem will be recounted in the characters' narratives or in flashbacks. employs extended similes (called epic similes) at appropriate spots of the story, and a traditional scene of extended description in which the hero arms himself. The term applies most directly to classical Greek texts like the Iliad and the Odyssey but it is clear that Roman authors like Virgil intentionally imitate the genre in works like the Aeneid. However, some critics have applied the term more loosely. The Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf has also been called an epic of Anglo-Saxon culture, Milton's Paradise Lost is called an epic of Christian culture, El Cid is an epic of Spanish culture, Longfellow's Hiawatha is an epic of American culture, and Shakespeare's various History Plays have been collectively called an epic of Renaissance Britain. Contrast with the mock epics of Alexander Pope and later Enlightenment writers to see its influence in humorous form.
    • A. 

      Figurative language

    • B. 

      Epithet

    • C. 

      Epic

  • 23. 
    Comes from the Greek for putting (something) on (something). It is a tag or nickname that can be used on its own or together with the real name, depending on other features of the Greek language. It is one of the most noticeable features of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. It adds add a bit of color and also fill out the meter when the name on its own doesn't quite fit. It serves as a mnemonic device reminding listeners that they have, indeed, already heard mention of the character.
    • A. 

      Figurative language

    • B. 

      Achaeans

    • C. 

      Epithet

  • 24. 
    Such as metaphors and idioms has been considered derivative from and more complex than ostensibly straightforward language. A contemporary view ,language involves the same kinds of linguistic and pragmatic operations that are used for ordinary, literal language."
    • A. 

      Fiction

    • B. 

      Homeric simile

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Figurative language

  • 25. 
    Is a branch of literature which deals, in part or in whole, with temporally contra factual events (events that are not true at the time of writing).
    • A. 

      Epic simile

    • B. 

      Fiction

    • C. 

      Homeric simile